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I'm attempting to resuscitate a 1979 Sport Sedan with an automatic transmission (ZF 3HP22). There doesn't seem to be a way to check fluid level and I have no ides what the atf capacity is. Any help would be greatly appreciated.
 

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I could find nothing in my owner's manual about the auto trans.
 

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There has to be a dipstick somewhere. It could be something very small on the trans itself or a long tube leading to somewhere to check the levels. My Acura has a short one in the front, and the spider has a long one like a trucks dip stick. Check with Jason at Alfissimo to see if he has a kit and gasket to service the trans. I have Dexron IV in the auto. It is a synthetic. .
Parts are available, mostly in Europe. It is a BMW gearbox so that is a plus for searching for parts. The steel clutch packs that hold the clutches are the hard parts to find so I have been told.
You have a very rare sedan. Those that were not sold here were shipped back to Italy and sold under a different model name.
 

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The web site I mentioned says there is a dipstick for the 3hp22.

PDF of the repair manual: 3HP22.pdf
:
 

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I have zero experience with automatic transaxle Alfas, but I do work on Porsches for a living, and front-engine, rear transaxle models (924, 944, 968, 928) don't have room for a dipstick, nor do transaxle Alfas. The Porsches in question with automatic transmissions (ZF trans in the 4-cylinder cars, Mercedes unit in the 928) use a translucent plastic "sight glass" attached to the side of the transaxle to provide a visual of the fluid level.

A quick search found this picture of a ZF auto trans from a Milano, which appears to have a similar device, visible in the second photo with the top view, on the passenger side of the trans, with the breather hose attached:


The usual method of checking fluid level of any ZF auto trans of the era is with the engine idling, shift through all of the gear positions, pausing in each one for a couple of seconds, then back to park, and then pull the dipstick----or in the case of a rear transaxle check the sight glass.
 

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The repair manual does show a diagram indicating the fill marks on the dip stick.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks so much for all the posts! I should be able to figure out the level now. This has been a long process of resuscitation and I'm nearing the point of getting this car on the road.
 

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Wasn't there some switch on the dash that you had to push, or slide, and then if the indicator light came on you had either enough, or not enough fluid?
Not to hijack your thread, but I have a stash of mostly early Alfetta Sedan parts for sale CHEAP. Exterior lights, new rubber parts, fuse boxes, 3 new rear brake rotors, some trim. PM me if interested.
 

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Wasn't there some switch on the dash that you had to push, or slide, and then if the indicator light came on you had either enough, or not enough fluid?
Not to hijack your thread, but I have a stash of mostly early Alfetta Sedan parts for sale CHEAP. Exterior lights, new rubber parts, fuse boxes, 3 new rear brake rotors, some trim. PM me if interested.
Thanks Larry. I will definitely keep you in mind as this project progresses. Yes, I see now that the dipstick port has a wire attached which must lead to the dash light switch. I still need to work out how to fill the transmission with new or more fluid.
 

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I think the repair manual has a photo of the mechanic pouring fluid into a funnel. Maybe that can give you a clue as to where the fill port is.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Thanks for all your help!! I've figured it out. On the right side of the transmission, there is a large L-shaped banjo fitting that has a breather tube attached. The top of the fitting is fitted with a screw-in level sensor that goes to a light on the dashboard. When fluid is low the circuit is open.. At proper level, the circuit is grounded. Seems backwards to me, but that's the way the meter reads. On the side of the level sensor barrel are marks for maximum and minimum fluid level. As I fill with transmission fluid, I will keep checking with a hand-made dip stick to get the right level. Thanks again for all the great responses.
 
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