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After sitting with its engine apart for some years, this B20 is going back together. This car, owned by my friend Steve is a series 6 car from 1958.
Steve received this car in 1965 as a gift! We have signed up for the Snowball
Rally with this car, so the race is on. Here's a few car pictures to start.
 

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Looks great! (I love the custom engine stand.) And a full Nardi kit--floor shift and twin-carb set-up; fantastic! Just make sure you have time to properly shake it down before taking it on an event like the Snowball.

BTW, why am I never around when people are giving away free Aurelias?
 

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BTW, why am I never around when people are giving away free Aurelias?
I know for my part - I wasn't even in the planning stage in my parents mind then ...

Looks lovely. I want that garage with all the Lancia spares. And I also want Steve's series 2 Appia Berlina ...
 

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The Nardi kits make for a very nice conversion on a truly splendid car. In addition to the twin carb kit there was another version which used a stack of (Delorto?) single barrel bike carbs. I saw one a number of years ago at Laguna Seca. It was a pretty complex set-up and didn't seem to work as well as it should.

Nice car! I wish I'd bought one when I had the chance.
 

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Thanx for the thread. One amazing car!
B 20´s are just the most fabolous cars around. Unfortunately i don´t have one myself, but I have had the fortune to drive the B 20 of my good friend Gunnar Høgenhaug - the Norwegian mr.Lancia - and it made me finally realize what is meant by the frequent car journalist expression "fantastic cornering"!! Never ever had a better ride through twisted roads :))
But, I don´t stop dreaming about a B20. In the mean time I am looking forward to go back to Norway for summer vacation and drive my two 58´berlinas: the Appia and the Flaminia. Just a sad story that it is literally impossible to come across a reasonable vintage Lancia here in Bay Area :-(
T
 

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1800UT

I think you mean this Nardi setup :

View attachment 203664

This is a superb advertisement from 1952.

Philip

Yes, that's the one I saw. As I recall the car was from Seattle, Washington, USA and had possibly belonged at one time to Richie Ginther. One thing I've always loved about Italian design is that there's often a strong element of whimsy attached to the things they make. It's never enough to make it impossible but just ever so slightly on the other side of practical. Keeps things interesting that way. As I recall, the owner was having a difficult time getting his car to run right.
 

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Yes, that's the one I saw. As I recall the car was from Seattle, Washington, USA and had possibly belonged at one time to Richie Ginther. One thing I've always loved about Italian design is that there's often a strong element of whimsy attached to the things they make. It's never enough to make it impossible but just ever so slightly on the other side of practical. Keeps things interesting that way. As I recall, the owner was having a difficult time getting his car to run right.
I know at least one B20 owner who swapped his two-carb set-up for a stock single-carb set-up, and reports that the drivability is much better with the single carb. Based on that I'm not at all surprised that 6 single-choke motorcycle carbs would present tuning problems for a street car.
 

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Subscribed.

Pete
 

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The B20 in question was owned for many years by the late Fred Armbruster, who wrote eloquently of the difficulties of running the car on the track. The problem with the six Amal carbs in a row was that they were sideways, and would starve out on the "wrong" turn. The absolutely transcendent solution, designed by a Lancia Club member who worked at Boeing, was a "weir" system, that kept a constant flow and a consistent fuel level.
 

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Dropped my B20 at Peter Harding's workshop for a service, MoT and some other small jobs this week. There were 4 outside, and another 3 in the barn. What a treat. I think every series was represented...

 

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It is similar in so many ways to the Alfetta/GTV6 that I believe Giuseppe Busso, et al. must have had the Aurelia in mind when they were designing the transaxle Alfas.

Keep the details and pictures coming.
 

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It is similar in so many ways to the Alfetta/GTV6 that I believe Giuseppe Busso, et al. must have had the Aurelia in mind when they were designing the transaxle Alfas.

Keep the details and pictures coming.
When the Alfettas first appeared the linkage to Lancia's designs was pretty obvious. However, where Lancia's remote change worked with a tactile smoothness that belied it's lengthy shift mechanism, the Alfetta gear change was pure crap---loose, imprecise, and embarassingly underdeveloped. By the time of the Alfetta, Alfa had lost most of it's post-war Alfa guys and what came later couldn't measure up to their engineering excellence. Add in underfunding and you have a car that really wasn't ready for prime-time. With the Alfetta, Alfa missed a wonderful come-on opportunity. After driving a 105 series car, Alfas floppy Alfetta change was almost insulting to drive.

Williamcorke: A whole shop full of Aurelias! What a thought! Peter Harding's
Workship sounds like it inherited the mantel of Harry Manning's old shop. Halcyon days . . .
 

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Dropped my B20 at Peter Harding's workshop for a service, MoT and some other small jobs this week. There were 4 outside, and another 3 in the barn. What a treat. I think every series was represented...[/IMG]
There was a 1st Series?? It's remarkable enough to see seven B20s in one place.
 

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When the Alfettas first appeared the linkage to Lancia's designs was pretty obvious. However, where Lancia's remote change worked with a tactile smoothness that belied it's lengthy shift mechanism, the Alfetta gear change was pure crap---loose, imprecise, and embarassingly underdeveloped. By the time of the Alfetta, Alfa had lost most of it's post-war Alfa guys and what came later couldn't measure up to their engineering excellence. Add in underfunding and you have a car that really wasn't ready for prime-time. With the Alfetta, Alfa missed a wonderful come-on opportunity. After driving a 105 series car, Alfas floppy Alfetta change was almost insulting to drive.
Note to self: Lancia guys are a touchy lot. :p
 

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It is similar in so many ways to the Alfetta/GTV6 that I believe Giuseppe Busso, et al. must have had the Aurelia in mind when they were designing the transaxle Alfas.

Keep the details and pictures coming.
180OUT said:
When the Alfettas first appeared the linkage to Lancia's designs was pretty obvious.
Er, Alfa Romeo was using transaxles way before the Aurelia. Note the name Alfetta refers to the 158/159 racing car, plus the 8c2900's were transaxle cars.

So yes maybe, but lets not incorrectly give all the credit to Lancia (actually Jano who designed the Aurelia and the Lancia F1 cars, etc., who remember was involved with the 8c2900's and designed all the wonderful pre war Alfa Romeos)... :confused:
Pete
 

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Note to self: Lancia guys are a touchy lot. :p
... yes - Whiny little snots, them Lancia owners ...

That pic with the B20s looks again like another entrance to heaven!
 
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