Alfa Romeo Forums banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
47 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
In most cases, Alfas will become classics in their due time, but some have speculated that the 156 will not become a classic due to its high sales and number in the market.
If that is the case, I would say that the Mustang then in America shouldn't have become a classic because it sold in its thousands of not hundreds of thousands.

The main reason I'm asking is that my car current value is quite low and I would have to spend quite a bit of money to get it back to proper showroom condition.
If I was to make that choice with my heart, I would instantly go for it 'coz I love the car and don't plan on selling it at any point.
However in terms of monetary value, as of yet I don't see it making much sense unless there was a good chance that it was to become a classic car in a period of 5 - 8 years.

Any ideas???
And also any ideas what should I not do to keep the value up???
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,087 Posts
It is not typical for a classic to be "discovered" as such with the passage of time. It is much more typical for a car to become a classic (and maybe move to collectible status) if when the car was new, it was a car that was generally well received by the buying public. If a large group of people lusted after a new car, even if they couldn't afford the car when new, they are typically the ones who will years later buy one, since it is a car they always wanted to own.

If a lot of people really liked the 156 when new, then I would say that it has a good chance of being a car that people will look to own years down the road. Hence, it would be classic material. Regardless, 5 to 8 years is simply not enough time for a regular car to go from being cool transportation to a true classic. Decades, not years, is the time frame.

The Mustang example is a good one. It was a big hit in 1965, fulfilling the "requirement" of being well-received by the buying public. Even more so, it sparked a new and exciting generation of automobiles. Everyone wanted a Mustang, or a rival Camaro, Firebird, etc. All of these cars were sold in large numbers, but there were always many more people who wanted one but didn't buy one at the time. (Large numbers do not affect classic status, but they do influence the collectible and market value.) As is typically the case nonetheless, these cars went from being very cool to just being used cars. By the mid-1970s they were already being displaced by the generation of personal luxury two-door cars and by the 1980s used Mustangs were very cheap. Nonetheless, as people grow older, they become more affluent and when the time comes when they can spend on themselves, they will seek the cars that made an impact during their day. And that is what happened with the Mustangs and muscle cars. The many who had owned one back in the day and the many who did not, but always wanted one, created a serious market for these cars.

The only way to really keep up the value of a car is to keep it in excellent shape. This usually means that you seldom drive the car, or you drive it and pay heavily to keep it in tip-top condition. Regardless, don't fool yourself into thinking that a classic car is a good investment. A classic is great fun and will bring you years of smiles, but it is not a money maker. Even when a classic that is excellent shape sells for top money, it is more than likely that the owner/seller is actually just recovering a percentage of his/her cost.

Best regards,
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
47 Posts
Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
I agree with you there.
Keeping a car in good condition is proving to be a task these days. Over here it has been a monumental task. Local kids running around scratching every car that looks better than their dad's Land cruisers, the two people in 4x4s who rammed me in the rear causing serious damage (fortunately no damage to the chassis) as well as the usual Alfa issues of reliability are only a few things I had to pay for.

I was watching a video of Wheeler Dealers online where they did this Bentley. Apparently they managed to up the value of the car by changing the color from blue to the 'Storm Grey' that is used in the current Continental GT.

Since my 156 needs a full body re-spray, due to kids putting 'X's on almost every panel, I wonder if I could get the same result if I updated it to a newer Alfa color......?
The thing is, I like the silver my car is in. Its original and it has a sort of blueish tint when the sun hits from certain angles, that I haven't seen on any current Alfa. Pictures below....

Cardomain page

A guy at the local dealer here suggested that I do a full body re-spray using an updated 2009 paint.
I don't really know what he is talking about.... Is he talking of putting an new Alfa color or the same current color???
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
67 Posts
Even if it doesn't become an outright classic, people will always pay a premium for the right car. I sold my immaculate 33 16valve for a decent price and at a higher price than the p4 that was for sale and still is for sale at the same time.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top