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After a discussion with a fellow classic car enthusiast i find myself wondering about the future of classic cars, their owners and values.Here i am talking about classic collectable cars in general, not just Alfas.
I dont have any firm facts or statistics but i would guess from own experience dealing with other enthusiasts that the most common age of owners would be in their 50s. In my own experience at least, i have not noticed as much interest or aspiration to own our current classic cars among people who are aged under 30.
This leads me to wonder what will happen to our cars when we older owners are ready to part with them or fall off the perch.
Will they become much less desirable and fall in value? Also with the world changing, and non petrol powered cars forseeably becoming the way of the future, will owning our current cars become more difficult and something of a burden?
Will the younger folk also be less able /willing to invest in classic cars due to changing economic conditions. In Australia for example the increasing cost of housing has stretched the resources of younger people to the extent that many risk going into retirement with unpaid morgages. This leaves little room for luxuries like expensive classic cars .
Just some random thoughts, and of course i still love my classic car...
Just wondering what others might think?
 

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I think you have answered most of your questions.. or musings.

I'll add.... my two sense

Car interest will always be a part of the culture.

Brass era cars are a give away compared to the halcyon days.

High performance cars with more "juice " -- Ferrari's especially... are reachable for similar numbers for a newbie.. Would you rather have a 308 that smells like a leather coutiere that goes and sounds like a missile or do you wish to spend your time on the internet solving mundane questions about an Alfa Romeo built between 1950 and 1990 that barely beat a VW Beetle off the line..

I love old sccchit.. but I am 75 and still appreciate steam engines.. Who was James Watt? I think the source of the answer is obvious. The same people who balked on the question couldn't tell you what Henry Ford did.

All is not lost .. just be careful what you think a jewel of a car is worth tomorrow IN YOUR LIFETIME ... after that who cares who is right., We are seeing an adjustment to values.. Old furniture has not ..yet.
 

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If you look at vintage cars that have taken off in price, the common thread is that they were of interest to serial collectors who want multiple copies of similar models. Look at the recent auction of Paul Walker's collection. He had seven M3's, five of which were E36 Lightweights. What drove the value explosion in the 911 world a few years ago were collectors who wanted multiple copies of vintage 911's. Porsche made variety of 911's over the years, and some collections wanted one of each with the rarer models commanding huge premiums. Cars that fit into larger modern collections will hold their values. Those that do not will languish.


High performance cars with more "juice " -- Ferrari's especially... are reachable for similar numbers for a newbie.. Would you rather have a 308 that smells like a leather coutiere that goes and sounds like a missile or do you wish to spend your time on the internet solving mundane questions about an Alfa Romeo built between 1950 and 1990 that barely beat a VW Beetle off the line.
Compared to modern cars, any 70's or 80's Ferrari will be dog slow. The 308 had a 1/4 mile time of more than 15 seconds, and most modern daily drivers are considerably faster. A 2 second difference in the quarter mile was important when GTV's and 308's were new. Now it is the difference between slow and slower.
 

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I don't think it'll be about power or speed. In the future (I mean pretty well from now) any electric car will accelerate faster than almost any combustion engine. I owned a 1980's Porsche 928 which was the fastest car porsche had ever made at that time. Now a mid range Giulia saloon will accelerate faster. It'll be the same in just a few years time comparing electric with all but hypercars.

It'll be about history, style and that hard to define thing, 'feel'. Both how the car handles and how it makes you personally feel. I sort of agree that I don't know where the next generation will come from but in an increasingly affluent society what will people spend money on as a hobby? The car is still the single greatest provider of personal freedom and demonstration of personality.

And our pastime is very restricted to developed western economies. What will happen when both China and the USSR develop actual good taste (I mean we're still waiting for signs of that...) to go along with their new found riches? Surely that will kick in a big new wave of owners.
 

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" but in an increasingly affluent society what will people spend money on as a hobby"

Unfortunately that doesn't appear to be true in this country now, as the income/wealth gap between the uber rich and the middle class and below is increasingly widening due to recent tax cuts, as reported by the WSJ; and more people are increasing their personal/family debt by unwise high priced purchases (ever wonder why the car companies are increasingly selling the popular high profit margin SUVs and pickups) to the extent they cannot pay for emergencies, or decent retirement, so it is reported.

I think that for most people the aura of the old "classic" cars will fade with time, except for those who have more time and money than they know what to do with, so amass collections of certain models just because they can, and because "the more you have when you die makes you more successful"?
 

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If you look at vintage cars that have taken off in price, the common thread is that they were of interest to serial collectors who want multiple copies of similar models. Look at the recent auction of Paul Walker's collection. He had seven M3's, five of which were E36 Lightweights. What drove the value explosion in the 911 world a few years ago were collectors who wanted multiple copies of vintage 911's. Porsche made variety of 911's over the years, and some collections wanted one of each with the rarer models commanding huge premiums. Cars that fit into larger modern collections will hold their values. Those that do not will languish.




Compared to modern cars, any 70's or 80's Ferrari will be dog slow. The 308 had a 1/4 mile time of more than 15 seconds, and most modern daily drivers are considerably faster. A 2 second difference in the quarter mile was important when GTV's and 308's were new. Now it is the difference between slow and slower.
It's not about speed...the generations before us boomers don't even know what carburettors are nor have they the interest to learn how to work on them. They can own an exotic car like a 308 or 328 that fits into today's traffic schemes littered with SUV's when sports cars like British cars and ALfAs get lost. These cars are still affordable by their income standards and they turn heads and boast performance and comforts a modern car delivers. It's all about practical style not a hobby like most of us enjoy. Ask the oldtimers why their cherished 40's and 50's Fords and Chevy's have cratered or go to an old car show and check out the color of the owner's hair.. if he has any.
 

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Gee you chaps are negative. There are still young people, male and female who are interested in "old" things, including cars and who have the disposable income to purchase whatever they choose. There are millions doing very nicely thank you. In fact one thing I have noticed is technology is changing so fast that even the young generation feel the need for some stability which older simpler things such as vehicles give. There is also that group of the young who are interested in design, and earlier technology ideas - pre late `90`s cars WERE INDIVIDUAL both in body design and powertrain/chassis design which in itself makes pre late `90`s vehicles and other things likely to survive as an item of interest. Certainly 70`s cars and backwards will survive and are easier and simpler to maintain thus being more attractive to own and that era was seen as a "golden age" culturally within the affluent countries. They will be either maintained by enthusiast keen owners who enjoy working on them as much as driving them or highly paid, seen as little gods, specialised old car technicians.
Fortunately for us our old Alfas have in their favour limited production numbers, quality old tech but high tech engineering (for their day)attractive design, and better than average performance (engine performance, handling, braking), plus the prestige of a very famous Italian manufacturer.
This will help.
By the way I am speaking from a world perspective not just the USA.
 

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Nothing negative... just saying.... enjoy the experience but don't expect a pot of gold at the end of it... think twice before expecting that. There is plenty of interest in HO trains and model airplanes that fly with .049's...just not what there was. Times and tastes do change. I think the original poster was going in that direction.
 

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Gee you chaps are negative. There are still young people, male and female who are interested in "old" things, including cars and who have the disposable income to purchase whatever they choose.
I agree. And there are ample examples that serve as analogues for coming generations who will enjoy old Alfas. A visit to any uni drama dapartment and you'll find plenty of 20 somethings avidly performing Shakespear. An even better example, perhaps, are the numerous young or youngish musician who enjoy playing early music . . . on early instruments. I think it's all about esthetics.


 

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....and then there's the question of the ability to maintain vintage cars.....a 105 body will probably be easier to keep going well into the future than a new Giulia with all the electronic components and intricacies of its design
 

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James I think most cars post late `90`s will be junked/recycled with little passion for later newer stuff - too similar and too complicated with too much reliance on electronics which are ultimately less durable, more complicated and difficult to diagnose and surprisingly the electronics and software being superceded continually with little remaining interest and knowledge in the superceded system. The new Giulias are likely to be a nightmare later on as are most cars including Ferraris, plus dare I say it they are less mechanical which is the appeal of the pre 90`s vehicles.
I think we are lucky in that future generations will still be interested in our Alfa Romeos and maybe they may wind back a little in value but like good art I suspect nice original ones will maintain reasonable future value.
 

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I've been a car guy all my life and at least two of my four sons, are as well. Even my 3 & 1/2-year-old grandson, Tanner, loves "car parts"!, But will the previous two generations be willing to put down their electronic pacifiers, come outside and be tempted by something other than an "appliance that does everything for them"; even one that can reach 198 MPH?

I had never heard of an Alfa Romeo until I saw one on Chuck Byrnside's driveway in October, 1965. He wanted $500 for a horribly-faded, white w/red 1959 AR Super Spider; no match for the two-year-old GTO I was lusting after. But, little did I know that I had been infected with the Alfa virus; alas, no cure.

With who's going to want our Alfas next, maybe, it's the sand dollar-on-the-beach scenario and we just need to expose some of the youngin's to the joy of Alfaing. We can't "save" them all, but maybe we can infect a few.

Personally, I love to talk to the old and the young guys on my street about my 64 Giulia Spider. I have been asked if it's a Cobra, TR4, MG, Fiat; even a Ferrari. When I tell them it's an Alfa Romeo, some get a nice smile on their face and I invite them in to take a look. The old guys reminisce; the young ones ask what it is. All are impressed when I tell them "It has a HEMI, in it!"

As far as who will own it when I no longer need it, Pete at 39 and Dave at 38 are already working on a time-share plan. Hopefully, by then, Tanner will be able to get his own fair share of Alfa time.
 

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I've been a car guy all my life and at least two of my four sons, are as well. Even my 3 & 1/2-year-old grandson, Tanner, loves "car parts"!, But will the previous two generations be willing to put down their electronic pacifiers, come outside and be tempted by something other than an "appliance that does everything for them"; even one that can reach 198 MPH?
While, like most of us, I give this passing thought from time to time, I have to also admit that just as often when I contemplate an anti-car future run by the Blue Meanies I am equally prone to simply say screw it and take my Super for a run in the Hill Country. That's one of the side benefits of being an old geezer . . .
 

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It will come down to just a few things that will decide what to keep and what to junk. Parts & Petrol. Can I get parts for the said car and what will the price of fuel be if I want to drive it.

I have three sons that are into cars. One is a HONDA guy who loves his CRX's ( what I call a Japanese Jr. Z) and one that is into JEEPs. Neither of them is an Alfa fanatic. The one that is the Alfa fan can't afford them.

Each to his own, I just happen to catch the Alfa fever looking for a rally car. Buying the Giulia Veloce changed my life in more ways than I would have ever expected.

I will be having some serious talks with my kids over the holidays as to what they have to say about my cars, parts and their disposition.

Cars with computers and sensors will be at the low end of the spectrum after we are gone, as there will not be anyone around to rebuild/repair/or replace parts needed to keep them on the road. Cars with carburetors will rule the day. Race cars will always be collectibles and the rare examples of a marque.
 

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I agree with you that most cars will probably go away and only famous vehicles will probably remain. I really do not care what happens to my cars after I am gone because you cannot control anything after your life ends. I will probably sell my cars to someone who wants to own them and maintain them.
 

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That is my 9 year old daughter. She told me, “dad, I’m having all your cars!”
I replied, “well, you had better learn to drive then!”.
I bought her a “vintage” kart and she loves it.
You need to encourage the youngsters. Far better than playing on a computer screen.
Regards Daniel
 

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I have a partial solution for at least my own next generation.

I have promised to will each of my two old cars to my two daughters with the proviso that they have to drive them 5000 miles before they are allowed to sell them. If that doesn't get them or anybody else in the family interested then they can move them on.

They have been quite scathing about my 'silly old cars' on the basis that anything their father does is by definition uncool, although the attitude has softened slightly as they exit teenage years.
 

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I agree with you that most cars will probably go away and only famous vehicles will probably remain. I really do not care what happens to my cars after I am gone because you cannot control anything after your life ends. I will probably sell my cars to someone who wants to own them and maintain them.
This is pretty much where I sit with it. All the interest in appreciation, and those that see alfas, or any cars as investments, are just silly to me.

I don't expect a penny for my cars, and would just leave them here after I'm gone, except I don't want to be a burden. So, they will go to someone who wants them if possible.

As to what will be "desirable" in the future, I don't have a positive outlook as things are going now. I expect only rich and poor people will remain much after I'm gone. I see my cars as middle class. So, there you go.
 
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