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Discussion Starter #1
I have to replace all of my hoses. They're old, showing small cracks when I inspected them this past weekend, and brakes are spongy. Fluid has been replaced a couple of times in last year, due to some brake and clutch work. I know I can easily use rubber ones, but I really want to improve the spongy feel.
 

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I installed the hoses from Goodridge a few years ago on my 91S. They seem to work well, the brakes response being tight, not spongy. I need to put sets on the Milano and 94LS one of these days.
 

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We're talking hoses not lines correct?
 

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Discussion Starter #9
You do get the metal ones as well, yeah?!
Not required, but I'm getting stainless sheathed since they help firm up the pedal on the mushy system. Mine are probably the original hoses, and they're near their life expectancy
 

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That's the same as braided hoses?
Mine are the originals too and have already worn off.
They are what resulted in my rear-ending a van last December and the crash left my 164 badly damaged at the front.
I'm not taking any chances with the brakes any longer, which is why I'm trying to figure out the best hose ; rubber or braided?
Thanks
Zaid
 

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I have to replace all of my hoses. They're old, showing small cracks when I inspected them this past weekend, and brakes are spongy. Fluid has been replaced a couple of times in last year, due to some brake and clutch work. I know I can easily use rubber ones, but I really want to improve the spongy feel.
I found no real advantage of using them. Personally I think they are a waste of money. I never noticed any difference in the feel and I had goodrich on mine for about a year or so. I have now been using the OEM pirelli lines since removing them. The OEM or Aftermarket all have steel braids or braided with some synthetic cloth through them anyway. Instead of a teflon inner line, it has a rubber and a think rubber skin over the steal braid. I think money can be spend on other more important things. New factory lines if they have never been replaced should do the trick at a lower cost. I am very happy with mine. Stops on a dime.

Any issues with braking IMO has never come down to the lines if they are in good shape. Softer brake pads will compress, old rubber seals in MC will be less effective. Brake booster having old rubber or old brake fluid that is no longer doing it's job. They will not bulge like Braided Stainless steel brake line companies will tell you. On a high performance vehicle such as the 164, the lines are well made for high performance cruising. They will be just as good or better than SS lines with no outer rubber. I guess a firmer pedal can be the result of SS lines but are the result of new rubber lines as well.

So my point is if you are replacing worn or semi worn rubber lines for SS, they will be an improvement but so will the OEM Especially due to the fact that you are bleeding the system with new fluid. Is one better than the other. I cannot say as teflon can crack over time while rubber can become soft or hard. I think the rubber will out last SS lines. SS lines are minimal if any improvement. I did not notice a difference at all in brake performance or pedal firmness from SS to Rubber. I also want to say, does pedal firmness really make for better braking? Our cars with ABS I feel it is just not needed. They will not stop you any quicker than OEM rubber. Even if there was a 'bulge' in the rubber hose that hose will still be holding in the fluid and moving the fluid to stop the vehicle. Sorry, I think they are all hype! Like I said anything feels better when replacing old parts for new. Luckily I have at my disposal the opportunity to actually test both and did. New lines both SS and Rubber feel the same when replacing old. Let's not forget we tend to also replace other parts such as pads and fluid while in there. OEM rubber hoses are much thicker, have a braided inner core and hard outer rubber, what are the odds something will hit the line and cut it? I had to take large tin snips to cut through the OEM line and it was pretty difficult.

Spend the money on new pads, new rotors, caliper rebuild, good fluid, brake master and new lines if needed.

SS will do the job but if you are looking for something better than OEM. I will say that OEM is a fantastic product for a standard street car even if hitting 135mph and needing to stop. SS vs. rubber…you won't notice a difference in stopping distance.
 

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Discussion Starter #14 (Edited)
Thanks for the info! I have put new rotors and pads all around. I think there is air in the system, but also the hoses are old. I've invested some money in the brakes, but they feel soft and I'm sure there is air in there. I prefer rubber ones since I can visually inspect them. I hope this does the trick. Fluid has been changed twice in the last 10 months. What brake hoses do you suggest for a 1991 164L?
 

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Thanks for the info! I have put new rotors and pads all around. I think there is air in the system, but also the hoses are old. I've invested some money in the brakes, but they feel soft and I'm sure there is air in there. I prefer rubber ones since I can visually inspect them. I hope this does the trick. Fluid has been changed twice in the last 10 months. What brake hoses do you suggest for a 1991 164L?
I have some OE left and Aftermarket. All made the same and same quality.
I think a proper bleeding, new hoses and proper bedding of pads will improve braking.
 

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I have put new Goodridge SS on other cars when their owners wanted these (on other than 164s) but I wasn't impressed. I have always been satisfied with oem style rubber brake lines like Jason and see no reason to "upgrade" either.
Charles
 

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I particularly like the quality of the ones I had made at the hydraulic shop. They weren't cheap either. I took in the old ones to get the sizes right. They were much better than other SS hoses I've seen, but like I said, I don't think they added much to the braking.
 

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I think the key is to change them regardless of brand/source every 10 years or so, or more often if you wish, just because of old age detriment.

I do tend to like the metal wire sheathing on the hose, just for added impact/cutting protection. Otherwise, I'm sure the OEM are ok.
 
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