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Discussion Starter #1
My niece will be spending the summer in Italy for her study-abroad program and I told her to try and find me a used late 60's/early 70's front license plate for GTV. I've seen them for sale on ebay before and if they are in any decent condition they are expensive(at least in my eyes). Does anyone have any ideas where she could pick one up? Flea markets, junkyards, stores, etc? Thanks
 

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Plates are not usually sold within Italy as by law they are to remain with the car (not with the owner) and be turned in when the car is scrapped.
 

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Maybe you mean for a plate holder?

joecab has right, in Europe plates are not free for selling or to have letters or numbers by the owner.

If finally, you need only the plate with the numbers, I can give you one option: You can find easily in Italy NOT ORIGINAL/official but copies like the originals in many shops. You must ask any garage shop there for details.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the replies. I did not know about the laws concerning expired plates in Italy. I figured they'd be for sale in numerous places.
 

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The 60's plates were often riveted on to the car, making removing/stealing them a bit of effort. The one I brought back from Rome in 92 was/is made of a plastic, not metal, came off a mid-60's Fiat and was a front plate..(wrecked car/don't ask). Repo's are great, I've made a few with steel/black paint...a trip to a sign shop to match letters and numbers font.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I was thinking of having one made by a friend of mine who is in the engraving business. He said it will be the reverse, though. Black plastic stock with the numbers routed out, so they will be set into the plate, not raised like the real one. I'm just looking for something to fill in the empty bracket rivetted to the front bumper. If someone wants to get that close to my car to complain that the plate is wrong, more power to them. They'll see a lot more things wrong with my car than just the plate!
 

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It's not so tough.....
Do a search on ebay.it
Several people sellong plates there. I've bought a couple sets and the shipping is cheap..
7 euro by postaraccmandata.
These are original late '60s composite plates.
Randy
 

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I lived in Italy for many years. I can offer a bit of information that might be helpful. First, the older plates were all black with white letters. At a certain point, they were partially orange, the rest white on a black background. The thing that's important to note is the first two letters refer to the region where the car was registered For example, Milano was "MI", Torino was "TO", Roma was "Roma" (the only one spelled out), Taranto was "TA", Napoli was "NA", Palermo was "PA", etc. For Italians who drove out of Italy, they had those white oval "I" stickers on the rear valance to make it clear where the car was from. Same thing went for other European countries.

So, if you are interested in a plate for your Alfa, you might either consider "MI" for Milano or another city where you might have your heritage.

Here's the part that might give you hope. In (I can't remember exactly when) the year 2000 or so, all European countries had to have white European plates, all the same, with the blue section with the 14 stars and the letter designation of the country (I, D, F, NL, etc.). As such, the old Italian plates were eventually removed from their cars, to be replaced by the European plates. So there may be some out there...

Of course, they did the European version of cash for clunkers, so lots of older cars were just junked with their old style plates. One last thing: Cars that were exported to the States kept their plates. That means there must be some plates somewhere in the States.

I hope that helps a bit. Cheers.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks for all the suggestions. I was hoping for the romance and ambience of my niece finding a used plate somewhere in Italy. I was especially hoping for her to find one with the "Roma" designation since that is the name of my late mother. Sure I can find them on eBay but any of the decent ones are quite pricey(at least what I think is pricey for a plate). With my car in a constant state of restoration, at this point the $80 to $100 can be better put into the car.
Randy, I found it amusing that when I went to eBay.it and did a search for license plates, there were lots and lots of US plates for sale!
 

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No worries. I lived in Rome for years (years ago) and I recall noting that it seemed like almost nothing was impossible there. I'm sure it hasn't changed. As they say there, "Basta volerlo.", which translates to "you just have to want it". Italians are a really great people with a great mentality.

Anyway, I would ask your niece to go to a junk yard with a friend to see if she can find an old black and white Roma plate on a junked car. They can't be used on the street anymore, so it should not be "too impossible". There are at least a few of these places just outside of Rome. If I were you, I would not just get the front plate. I'd get the whole set. Why not? I bet the cost would be the same.

Keep in mind that later plastic rear plates were in two pieces; they could be put together either to be a long rectangular plate or a square plate. I may actually have the orange Roma section of a two piece plate somewhere in "the black hole". Finding it in wouldn't be easy. Anyway, without the other half (the numbers), it would not scratch your itch at all. The one piece black and white plates are better, IMHO. All the best.
 

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The thing that's important to note is the first two letters refer to the region where the car was registered.
Could you clarify this a little? For instance, my grandfather was from a small town near Amalfi. The province is Salerno, the region is Campania. Which would supply the two-letter designation? I'm guessing the province.
 

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Yup. In trying to be less confusing, I confused more. Mea culpa. It sounds like your grandfather came from a town in the Provincia di Salerno in the regione di Campania, so his license plate would have been "SA". Of course, the regions are much larger than the provinces, and include names like Lazio, Marche, Toscana, Lombardia,Veneto, Emilia-Romagna, Molise, Puglia, Campania, etc. Each has many different provinces, and therefore, had various license plates within them. For example, Campania had both NA (Naples) and SA (Salerno), among others. Now they are all "I", unfortunately.
 

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If you use the website mentioned in post #2 (thanks Nicola) you can designate any numbers and region you want (MI = Milan, SA = Salerno, etc). The plates are good quality with raised letters. PM me with your email address if you want to see a photo of mine (file is too large to post here).
 

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Out of curiosity, what is the rule about actually having these on your car instead of an American plate?
 
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