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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello guys,
Does anyone know where I can get a clutch replaced in a 1979 Spider?
I'm in New Jersey but willing to travel to nearby states.

Thanks,
Carl
 

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I had work done on my 78 and 86 spider at International Motors in West Haven CT .
Tony the father did the most of the work, pretty reliable and will tell you what is needed.
I had a valve job, engine mounts on the 78, some a/c work on the 86, and they will probably inspect and work on the 86 transmission this winter when I pull the motor on the 86.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I had work done on my 78 and 86 spider at International Motors in West Haven CT .
Tony the father did the most of the work, pretty reliable and will tell you what is needed.
I had a valve job, engine mounts on the 78, some a/c work on the 86, and they will probably inspect and work on the 86 transmission this winter when I pull the motor on the 86.
Thanks, I will check it out if no one is closer!
 

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Any competent shop that works on imported cars should be able to replace the clutch on an Alfa spider. There is nothing tricky or unique to Alfa involved. It would be nice to find someone who has done 100 Alfa clutch jobs already, since they might be more time efficient. But if that requires you to transport your car there and back, going with "Bill's Import Service" might be the better solution.
 

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There is Eurotec in Livingston NJ. A bit closer. For Moorestown, there is/was the Alfa Performance Center in Newportville PA, but I am not sure if they are in business anymore (215 826 9250). I have never used Woody, but have only heard good things about him.

Mo in NJ
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Any competent shop that works on imported cars should be able to replace the clutch on an Alfa spider. There is nothing tricky or unique to Alfa involved. It would be nice to find someone who has done 100 Alfa clutch jobs already, since they might be more time efficient. But if that requires you to transport your car there and back, going with "Bill's Import Service" might be the better solution.
Good to know. Do they have to pull the engine to replace the clutch?
Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
There is Eurotec in Livingston NJ. A bit closer. For Moorestown, there is/was the Alfa Performance Center in Newportville PA, but I am not sure if they are in business anymore (215 826 9250). I have never used Woody, but have only heard good things about him.

Mo in NJ
Yes, I think Woody is done.
I'll check with Eurotec.
Thanks
 

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Good to know. Do they have to pull the engine to replace the clutch?
A shop that has a lift and a couple of strong guys on hand will just remove the transmission. You might have them look at the giubo, U-joints, pilot bearing, and rear main seal while they have things apart. Plus, of course, replace the pressure plate, disk and throw-out bearing.
 

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If you're handy, you can save the shop time and aggravation by removing the console prior to bringing the car. They will need to remove a single bolt to remove the shifter.
 

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If you're handy, you can save the shop time and aggravation by removing the console prior to bringing the car. .....
.... and when you put it back in, you can make sure all the wires are properly re-connected and all the screws re-installed.

Removing and replacing a console is a bit too detail-oriented for a general repair shop to get right. I'm not excusing poor work; just saying that the sort of person who can muscle out a transmission can't necessarily re-connect the blue wire to terminal 54b. Sort of like asking your dermatologist to perform heart surgery - not their skill.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
A shop that has a lift and a couple of strong guys on hand will just remove the transmission. You might have them look at the giubo, U-joints, pilot bearing, and rear main seal while they have things apart. Plus, of course, replace the pressure plate, disk and throw-out bearing.
What is the giubo?
And thanks to all who responded!!
 

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Read the discussions about the quality of aftermarket pressure plates before you spend money and maybe make the car less reliable. Also note that there are differences in materials of construction of some aftermarket throw-out bearings.
 
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What is the giubo?
And thanks to all who responded!!
It's the rubber donut between the driveshaft and transmission output flange. It acts to dampen driveline shock and allows for a certain amount of movement. Being made of rubber, it will wear out over time. While it generally won't let go without plenty of warning (vibrations) except in race conditions, a worn out guibo can theoretically result in the driveshaft letting go (with potentially disastrous results including the driveshaft end making its way into the passenger compartment).

Since you need to pull the driveshaft to remove the transmission anyways, you might as well do the guibo too as it's not an expensive part and there's no additional work to replacing it.

Transmission removal can be done alone or in tandem with an engine pull. Most shops would pull the transmission alone unless they are addressing other engine out issues (such as a rear main seal leak), but many DIY types will pull them together as it's a lot easier to get everything to mate up properly on the ground (especially when you don't have a lift).
 

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Spiders: 1971 red, 1971 white, 1973 yellow, 1974 Silver, 1980 Brown, 1983 Blue, 1992 and 93 Green
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If you have grinding in the gears (3-2 downshift is the most common) or the shifter pops our of gear or reverse, you should have those items addressed. You paid labor to R&R the transmission, so why not fix it when it's out? Also, check the motor mounts and transmission mount. It's a good time to get those changed if it's needed.

You'll love the feel of a new clutch. Also, to save the life of the clutch, double clutch when downshifting and do your best to rev match on both upshifts and downshifts. And don't run too much RPM when engaging the clutch.
 
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