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1978 Spider 1984 Spider
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Discussion Starter #1
well buttoned up the oil pan, refilled and started it . no "apparent" leaks and oil pressure came up a few points...I had no clue what weight oil was in before.

anyway, this morning I find an oil slick under the car and a fairly constant drip...I guess the new gasket is crap???

I bought a gasket on line from a "Mr Fiat"..it was paper thin...from reading other posts, I had sprayed it with some water to help swell it up and help it "stick" in place as I installed the bolts. I was very careful to make sure the gasket was in place all around and that none of the gasket holes fell inside the pan.

Of note is that when I removed the pan there was no gasket. Just black Permatex silicone. I guess now I know why??? I supposed these pans warp a little over the years and silicone fills those warped spots?

Or was I supposed to use silicone on the gasket?
 

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Centerline sells a "premium" pan gasket that has a bead on it. I have had better success with that gasket but also use a small amount of RTV.
 

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1978 Spider 1984 Spider
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Discussion Starter #4
i suspected as much :/ been a long time since I did an oil pan gasket.

Any chance I can drain, drop, wipe and apply silicone the gasket I just installed? Or will the oil penetration into the gasket prevent any possible bond?
 

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First determine were the leak is coming from. The lower pan is prone to get damaged and crack. The gasket there is better left off and use a good rtv. Also check the drain plug area for cracks from over torque and ir a bad copper gasket. You can do just the lower pan just clean with brake cleaner and if you let the upper pan sit over night then clean before installing the lower pan with rtv. I would let that sit over night again to allow for the rtv to cure. Good luck
 

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But Mad North-Northwest
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Paper gaskets seal by swelling, yes. But using water on an oil-sealing gasket was probably not a good thing.

Permatex does not recommend using RTV as a skim coat on paper gaskets. Paper gaskets and RTV seal in different ways and they shouldn't be combined. So use one or the other, not both.

Some good advice in the link below if you want to go the black RTV route. Read and follow the directions carefully with RTV or you can really screw things up. It's not difficult but you have to do it right, especially on an oil pan where there's the risk of squeeze-out into the pan.

 

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Is this the bottom gasket, for the finned base? Or the upper gasket to the block?
Bottom gasket is paper thin by design, related to pickup height of oil pump.
Andrew
 

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1978 Spider 1984 Spider
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Discussion Starter #8
bottom pan gasket. When I removed the pan all there was was black RTV, no gasket
Some good advice in the link below if you want to go the black RTV route. Read and follow the directions carefully with RTV or you can really screw things up. It's not difficult but you have to do it right, especially on an oil pan where there's the risk of squeeze-out into the pan.

some good info...

It's the bottom gasket. When removed there was no gasket and black RTV. I assumed the PO was cheap in not buying a pam gasket.
 

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It's not uncommon. I had a big leaker on a Super engine I rebuilt for a guy last year. No gasket and major scrapes/dings in the bottom pan sealing surface, not sure how that happened, so the oil flowed right out. Got another bottom, new gasket, a bit of sealer, and all good. Make sure both surfaces are flat and clean?
Andrew
 

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Discussion Starter #10
well, it wasn't leaking before I dropped the pan...so the issue apparently is my gasket & pan assembly procedure...
 

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In a word, bummer. These are precise but simple surfaces, but it's a long surface with a lot of fit that has to be just right. These cars are old ...
Andrew
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Probably explains why RTV was used before. I just assumed a cheap PO didn't wanna buy the correct gasket...I guess he knew more than me...lol
 

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with no gasket and no sealant it wasn't leaking?

edit: ah just reread...there was RTV used.
 

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But Mad North-Northwest
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Probably explains why RTV was used before. I just assumed a cheap PO didn't wanna buy the correct gasket...I guess he knew more than me...lol
Like folks said, probably some warp/wear in the pans, and you were using a pretty thin gasket. Soaking it with water probably hurt you, too.

If it were me doing the job I'd probably buy the Centerline premium gasket. You want to install that dry or you'll kind of defeat the point of having the silicone sealing bead.

If you're in a rush black RTV in place of a gasket will work, it's just that I hate cleaning that crap off if I ever have to disassemble things again. So I tend to prefer a high-quality gasket instead, but that's me. Like I said, just be sure to religiously follow the directions on the Permatex site and you'll be fine.
 

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i suspected as much :/ been a long time since I did an oil pan gasket.

Any chance I can drain, drop, wipe and apply silicone the gasket I just installed? Or will the oil penetration into the gasket prevent any possible bond?
use hondabond, you brush it on, so you get a better coatings,and less mess. i use hondabond on some gaskets, like waterpump, timing cover, oil pans, it seals those hairline scrathes, my ecotec conversion gomes with just a few gaskets. the pan and the bedplate have no gaskets, just silicone togeather, when i pulled them aprts, there was some silicon on the inside of the casting, so honabond for me, when i build the engine next week
 

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