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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hi,
I own a 72 Berlina and have both the original (to the car) steel wheels as well as a set of Turbina wheels which are currently mounted.
I would like to fit performance tires on the Turbinas for rallies (SoCal TT, Carrera CA, etc) and the regular street tires (Dunlop SP20) on the steelies for every day driving around town.

Now here is my question - I think I read somewhere that the wheel lug nuts are different for those wheels. Is that true and why?
Can I use the nuts that are on the currently mounted Turbinas for the steel wheels or would this be a safety issue?

So far I have not been successful at even finding a full set of (steel wheel) lug nuts, so if it turns out that I need them and you have one, PM me :)
 

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My experience is all the Alfa wheels can use the same lug nuts, assuming you've got RH and LH thread correct. A 2000 would be all RH. Some nuts differ in design (the ridge for the sombrero caps; closed top; open top) but the thread and angle that bears on the wheel are the same.

Aftermarket wheels, you need to know about the angle of the hole for the stud.
Andrew
 

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I'm going to back up Andrew here, I was a distributor for wheels and aftermarket is where the shape of the lug changes based of vendor and or style of wheel. They can be acorn or cone shaped and so on.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thank you guys, I guess I will just give it a whirl.
Now if I could only remember why I thought they might be different and who told me.... :)
 

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There are unquestionably different length studs, and nuts. 1750 and earlier studs are too short for most mags, including Turbinas and Bosch Spider wheels. You only have 4-5 threads to grab, not enough to be strong/safe. Conversely, 2000 studs are very long, and some of them have an unthreaded shoulder at the base, so you can run out of thread, with a thin steel wheel, before the nut tightens up against the wheel. Just had this happen on a Duetto, had to use 5mm wheel spacers on the back. Or you can swap studs for all-threaded, but that's a sizeable hassle.

There are also different size nuts. Up through 1750, they used a brass or steel 22mm nut. From 2000 on, it's a 19mm nut, of various types, all steel as far as I've seen. Same thread and pitch though.

Andrew
 

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as Andrew says, partly depends on year, model and original equipment. The turbinas used a capped nut, early cars with hubcaps used an open ended nut, I don't have a berlina 2000 parts book that would answer the question definitively; if steel wheels on a berlina 2000 there would be a sombrero hub cover that could use either a capped nut open ended nut. The problem is when the car was equipped with turbinas from the factory the studs were longer as the wheel is thicker, so if you put a steel on a factory turbina car and tried to use the factory capped nut it wouldn't hold the steel wheel as it would tighten to the end and not be tight against the wheel. That said most times the capped nuts I see on the cars are not original, but much longer nuts that look like bullets sticking out of the hub. The other problem is on a factory steel wheel car with short studs, once you put the turbina on there isn't a lot of thread holding that wheel, not recommended for performance applications.
 

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There are also different size nuts. Up through 1750, they used a brass or steel 22mm nut. From 2000 on, it's a 19mm nut, of various types, all steel as far as I've seen. Same thread and pitch though.
1750's, at least US spec, went to steel from brass, 67 was brass, 68??
 

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I can attest that a later model long stud, when used with a very thin hubbed wheel, can cause the commonly available closed-end nuts to either bind or bottom out. Specifically, the Alfaholics GTA-replica 15 X 7 can cause the later studs to bottom on the standard closed-end nut. A minimum of a 5mm spacer must be used, and even that requires that the nut have a full-width, not tapered, thread all the way to the end of the nut.

There are solutions to allow you to swap the wheels using the same closed-end nuts, but you need to at least think it through rather than just assume because a nut is tight on the torque wrench that it is also tight on the wheel.
 
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