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Discussion Starter #1
OK I have my front rotors turned and my wheel bearings packed and I'm ready to install. So, what is the procedure to adjust the wheel bearings and how tight should I torque the spindle nut to?

Thanks!
 

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Hi Steve, unless you dont have any alfa tech bulletin manual (which says exactly what need to do) , try searching in alfabb by using the right words, there is a huge info about this. If finally will not work, ask Jim , papajam , has more than everything...
cheers
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks, I actually have the CarDisc whose pages I'll have to sort through to find the info. I also found some info from Timken, BUT my torque wrench doesn't go below 20 lbs. ft so I'm wondering if anyone here has done it by feel. Thanks!
 

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Tightening by feel should work fine. But first snug them down a bit too tight to make sure the races are fully seated, then loosen the nut and tighten just a little.

Sure seems like a good excuse for an inch/pound torque wrench. (if you're the type of guy who needs an excuse to buy tools, that is...)
 

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To do it by hand:

Mount the wheel. Spin the wheel slowly while tightening the nut too much, you will feel the drag go up quite a bit when they are too tight. Back off the nut and then retighten it until you feel it "firm up" in the wrench or channel locks (what I use). stop the wheel from turning and grab it top and bottom. see if you can feel any rocking or slack in the bearing. If it feels tight, then you are in the right range.

Tapered bearings need just a little bit of pre-load in them to work right. It's definately a feel thing. If your unsure, get a wrench. But if you do it this way 3-4 times, you will begin to get a feel for it and you will know when the slack is gone and the preload is in.

Befrore becoming a master mechanic back in the 70's and 80's I learned from a master and spent a WEEK making these adjustments on a junker outside the shop. Every day, I had to repack, mount and adjust them until he was happy. Frigging task master was old Morty.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for all the info! I got my front rotors back from the brake shop and the guy said, "I repacked and installed the wheel bearings for you. No charge." Wow, thanks! That's service. Above and beyond. I...hey wait a minute, these are full of swarf! Yup, good old American quality and attention to detail.

So I spent the rest of the day cleaning all of the grease and crud out and now I have to re-repack the bearings. What is the grease that I use? The old stuff was blue.

Thanks!
 

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To much preload will allow the roller bearings to squish all the grease out and you'll be running metal on metal. I've always left one flat off of tight to allow for the slightest of movement which goes away when everything gets heated up and the grease isn't displaced by excessive preload. Peload is good on bearings that run in a gear oil but with a grease it can get rolled out. Not saying this is the only way. It was taught to me by an old aircraft mechanic working on Steermans who ended up flying B-52's and was was checked out in over 100 aircraft. We spent many a weekend repacking the boat trailer wheel bearings every spring long before bearing buddies. Never had one fail as i'm sure a slightly different technique has never had a failure either.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
All very good info, thanks!
 
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