Alfa Romeo Forums banner

1 - 20 of 28 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
115 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Sorry if this is a dumb question but I have been looking at the threads regarding replacing rear wheel bearings and the axle shafts just pull out of the tubes by disconnecting the brake mechanism and the 4 nuts holding the tube to the carrier. Does that mean the only thing that stops the wheel and drive shaft exiting the car is the integrity of the wheel bearing as there is no axle nut on these cars. So if the bearing broke up it would be a very dangerous situation.
 

·
But Mad North-Northwest
Joined
·
11,621 Posts
No, there's a ring inside of the bearing that holds everything together. You heat it up, drop it on the axle, and when it shrinks it tightly holds the backing plate & bearing in place.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,618 Posts
I knew it was a dumb question. Thanks
If you do not know the answer, it is not a dumb question. That is what we are here for on AlfaBB
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
11,775 Posts
No, there's a ring inside of the bearing that holds everything together. You heat it up, drop it on the axle, and when it shrinks it tightly holds the backing plate & bearing in place.
Well, not only that ring - the brake disk and caliper prevent the kind of catastrophic failure that Lear envisions (or envisages or whatever). With drum braked cars, you generally see a more positive attachment, such as a threaded nut.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Gubi

·
But Mad North-Northwest
Joined
·
11,621 Posts
Good point! What with having the caliper off while I'm dealing with the axle I never really think about that being a backup.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
115 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
You may understand my confusion after 40 years maintaining my TR4a Engineering a bit different. So as to understand the order of things. To replace the bearing:
1/ Remove ancillaries. Calliper, disc etc
2/ Detach axle tube from hub (4 nuts)
3/ Pull out drive shaft
4/ Somehow remove ring
5/ Pull shaft out of hub
5/ Press bearing out of hub
6/ Install new bearing on shaft (will this slide or need to be pressed?) ( or is it pressed into hub)
7/ Press shaft into hub (if bearing installed on shaft or slide in if bearing had been installed in hub)
8/ Heat ring and slide down shaft to secure all in place
9/ Reassemble everything
If correct I will do items 1-3 and 9 but get my local machine shop to do 4-8
So different from the way us Brits designed drive trains.

thank all
Simon
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
11,775 Posts
You may understand my confusion after 40 years maintaining my TR4a Engineering a bit different. So as to understand the order of things. To replace the bearing:....
Yes, you have the steps and their sequence about right. The only things I would add/clarify:

"3/ Pull out drive shaft" - It usually takes more than muscle power to get this apart. Plan on using a slide hammer, or rig up some sort of a puller to break the axle & bearing free. The bearing isn't pressed in but it tends to get stuck due to corrosion and dried lubricant. Upon reassembly, you can use the four studs & nuts to pull it back into place.

"4/ Somehow remove ring" - I've never done that operation, but I believe most people just split the old rings with a chisel and use new rings for the re-install.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,618 Posts
You may understand my confusion after 40 years maintaining my TR4a Engineering a bit different. So as to understand the order of things. To replace the bearing:
1/ Remove ancillaries. Calliper, disc etc
2/ Detach axle tube from hub (4 nuts)
3/ Pull out drive shaft
4/ Somehow remove ring
5/ Pull shaft out of hub
5/ Press bearing out of hub
6/ Install new bearing on shaft (will this slide or need to be pressed?) ( or is it pressed into hub)
7/ Press shaft into hub (if bearing installed on shaft or slide in if bearing had been installed in hub)
8/ Heat ring and slide down shaft to secure all in place
9/ Reassemble everything
If correct I will do items 1-3 and 9 but get my local machine shop to do 4-8
So different from the way us Brits designed drive trains.

thank all
Simon
Sounds about right. Now you have me feeling nostalgic for my old TR5. Good memories
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
115 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Thanks all
Bought my TR4a in 1974 and went on honeymoon it. Only sold it last year because the family’s family of classic cars was expanding faster than my belly, so one had to go. ( My wife suggested getting rid of the belly). My elder son has the Alfa Spider, my younger son a ‘67 split screen VW camper and my wife a beautiful series 1 Fulvia sport Zagato. They are all at my house so the deal is I can drive them all as long as I fix them. A good deal ......er.... I think.
A year ago the British Government removed the need for 40 + year olds cars to have the annual roadworthy test. It certainly takes the pressure off being the unpaid maintenance manager, but if 3 old cars had to go to a garage every time something squeaked we could not afford to enjoy them, So force majeure. Problem is I am the type who wants to understand a task before starting, so I do ask a lot of questions.
This forum is brilliant for the Alfa. The other cars’ forums are nowhere close to being so pro-active.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
115 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
Last question...maybe
Is the new bearing pressed into the hub and then the axle pressed in or the bearing pressed on to a the axle and the pressed into the hub or does it not matter.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
11,775 Posts
Is the new bearing pressed into the hub and then the axle pressed in or the bearing pressed on to a the axle and the pressed into the hub or does it not matter.
Oh, it matters. The id of the bearing will be a much tighter fit onto the axle shaft than the od of the bearing into the axle tube. So press the bearing on the axle first. People use a long pipe around the axle shaft to hammer/press the bearing on.

Once you have cleaned the id of the axle tube, the od of the bearing will fit into it fairly easily. At most, you will need the force of tightening the four studs to draw it in.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
115 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
OK
I am slowly getting there, does the bearing OD mate with the ID of the tube or the ID of the hub. In other words does the bearing fit 100% inside the hub 100% inside the tube or somewhere in between?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
115 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
Although I am sure it will all come crystal clear once I have got it all out
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,618 Posts
Thanks all
Bought my TR4a in 1974 and went on honeymoon it. Only sold it last year because the family’s family of classic cars was expanding faster than my belly, so one had to go. ( My wife suggested getting rid of the belly). My elder son has the Alfa Spider, my younger son a ‘67 split screen VW camper and my wife a beautiful series 1 Fulvia sport Zagato. They are all at my house so the deal is I can drive them all as long as I fix them. A good deal ......er.... I think.
A year ago the British Government removed the need for 40 + year olds cars to have the annual roadworthy test. It certainly takes the pressure off being the unpaid maintenance manager, but if 3 old cars had to go to a garage every time something squeaked we could not afford to enjoy them, So force majeure. Problem is I am the type who wants to understand a task before starting, so I do ask a lot of questions.
This forum is brilliant for the Alfa. The other cars’ forums are nowhere close to being so pro-active.
True. I am on the Jaguar forum and the Porsche forum and neither is near as helpful as this one.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
11,775 Posts
I am slowly getting there, does the bearing OD mate with the ID of the tube or the ID of the hub. In other words does the bearing fit 100% inside the hub 100% inside the tube or somewhere in between?
Not sure I understand the question. My advice is simply to take it apart - then it will all be clear.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,101 Posts
Lear, seek advice from the supplier on heating the retaining ring as it's now common practice to press this ring on without heat. Note some axles (early type?) have a screw on nut as the retainer. The bearing and retaining ring are a generic component, as are the axle seals. They should be available at a bearing supply store.

Also worth pointing out, seeing as you are new to alfa, the 105 rear wheel bearings have quite a lot of play in them, maybe more than you are used to.
Oh, you also most likely have to dismantle the handbrake assembly and backing plate.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,604 Posts
I haven’t been able to find it this morning but somewhere on the bb gprocket has a video about a rear wheel bearing change.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
115 Posts
Discussion Starter #20
Yes there is quite a lot of information available but one has to dig a bit. I found a good thread within a thread within a tread showing a guy butchering the retaining ring and then butchering the bearing off.
whilst there was a lot of blood it did illustrate the parts and the order to do things. Am pretty sure I have got it all understood now. He did use the heat treatment on the new ring but I will take advise from my supplier and machine shop on that one. One thing it did show was that once all assembled but not attached to the axle tube the hub assembly was quite wobbly. I guess it does not matter once all attached.
thanks all
 
1 - 20 of 28 Posts
Top