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Discussion Starter #1
My Giulietta Instruction Book includes the specs needed to aline the front wheels.

Can't find anything about the correct ride height.

Can anyone supply this?
 

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So, what was it? Inquiring minds want to know!

I've always made an estimate by looking at the angle of the lower a-arm in the factory drawings.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
When the alignment is correct --the ride height is correct.

That is with fresh, but standard springs and shocks.

I'm going out to Don Nimi's PDM Racing and he has a laser alignment set up. We'll see if the computer has the specs for a 62 Alfa.:)
 

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Trained (ex)Professional, , 1953-2018 RIP,
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The following distances should be checked with 50kg in each seat and 25kg on the floor in front of each seat. In addition, the shocks and anti-roll bar should be disconnected.

To measure the front ride height, start at the centerline of the lower wishbone bushing. Measure out from the bushing centerline along the wishbone a distance of 30mm. From this point, measure the distance from the bottom of the wishbone to the gound. This is distance 'B'. Again, from the bushing centerline, measure out a distance of 280mm. From this point, measure the distance to the ground. This is distance 'A'. Subtrate the 'A' distance from the 'B' distance. The result should be 8mm +/- 3mm for all models except the Berlina and TI whose result should be 5mm +/- 3mm.

The rear ride height is the distance between the top of the axle tube and the apex of the bumpstop. The distance should be 40mm +/- 5mm for all models except the Berlina and TI whose distance should be 25mm +/- 3mm.

If you need the alignment specs, please let me know.
 

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The following distances should be checked with 50kg in each seat and 25kg on the floor in front of each seat. In addition, the shocks and anti-roll bar should be disconnected.

To measure the front ride height, start at the centerline of the lower wishbone bushing. Measure out from the bushing centerline along the wishbone a distance of 30mm. From this point, measure the distance from the bottom of the wishbone to the gound. This is distance 'B'. Again, from the bushing centerline, measure out a distance of 280mm. From this point, measure the distance to the ground. This is distance 'A'. Subtrate the 'A' distance from the 'B' distance. The result should be 8mm +/- 3mm for all models except the Berlina and TI whose result should be 5mm +/- 3mm.

The rear ride height is the distance between the top of the axle tube and the apex of the bumpstop. The distance should be 40mm +/- 5mm for all models except the Berlina and TI whose distance should be 25mm +/- 3mm.

If you need the alignment specs, please let me know.
This seems like sound advice, but I have questions.

Where does this come from? I cannot find it in the Giulietta shop manual.

What difference does it make where one starts on the lower control arm for the front measurement, as long as the two points at which control arm height is measured are 250 mm apart? (280-30) The control arm follows a straight line. I hope.

In measuring the rear, what defines the "apex" of the bumpstop? If the apex is part of the rubber, then I don't see how this is a reliable enough point from which to measure. This is a soft rubber part that might have deformed over the years, isn't it?
 

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My Giulietta Instruction Book includes the specs needed to aline the front wheels.

Can't find anything about the correct ride height.

Can anyone supply this?
Look in the front of the Owner's manual under "Main Features" ...Jim's sources must be from tech amendments.. Curiously, the ride height on Giulia Spiders and Giulietta Spiders is the same 1335 mm with top up. I have always found Giulias to look a mm or 2 higher.. or was that 3 mm? Uncle

The Giuiia owners manual refers to the weight ballast to configure/align the front track. The Guilietta shop manual says the car should have a "full load and (4 persons and a full petrol tank) to have the wheels vertical... go figure ...Are those fat people or skinny people? Don't ask how you get 4 of anybody in a Spider. It's all a hoax. TMI....Uncle

I refer to the "look" or stance of the car to "look" like factory press shots and never measure to "curly red hairs". Add 165's to the mix and you are really screwed. (Into the ground)
 

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Trained (ex)Professional, , 1953-2018 RIP,
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Where does this come from? I cannot find it in the Giulietta shop manual.
The info is from Information Sheet 0.00.053 originally issued 12 March 1965 in Italian. Please click below for the English language version.

What difference does it make where one starts on the lower control arm for the front measurement, as long as the two points at which control arm height is measured are 250 mm apart? (280-30) The control arm follows a straight line. I hope.
Looking at the drawing, I say first starting 30mm from the bushing centerline would put the measuring point firmly on a straight portion of the wishbone. And it doesn't look like there's a heck of a lot more than 250mm of straight wishbone to begin with.

In measuring the rear, what defines the "apex" of the bumpstop? If the apex is part of the rubber, then I don't see how this is a reliable enough point from which to measure. This is a soft rubber part that might have deformed over the years, isn't it?
The apex is the uppermost point of the bumpstop's lower curve (see drawing). To choose a component that is subject to weather, wear, cracking, distortion, destruction, etc is IMO, the worst possible location to pick for a 'fixed' chassis point. It is the ultimate contradiction to Alfas engineering skills.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
My question was from 2007!
Jim and "Uncle"--I'm glad that you guys are still around.
Also, V. pleased to be writing this post.
:)
 

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My question was from 2007!
Jim and "Uncle"--I'm glad that you guys are still around.
Also, V. pleased to be writing this post.
:)
I've been banned from worse places than this another (boomerang play on words).. I'll outlive all of you, as ai light another cigar.
 

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It is still a good question, if I don't know the answer!

Thanks, Papajam. I understand that the right way to measure ride height is by measuring control arm angles, and Alfa appears to have felt that way, at least as far as front suspensions are concerned. The method of measuring in the rear depends on the condition of the rebound rubber, which is not as reliable. At least the rebound rubbers are good quality and don't seem to distort as much as, say, spring perch rubbers.

An approach in the rear would be to measure the angle of the lower trailing arms. Illustrations in the manual make it appear that they should be parallel to the ground.

The takeaway is the 30 mm measurement in front is not all the critical, but the 250 mm measurement is. It would be better to pick a spot approximately 30 mm from the pivot, then measure exactly 250 mm from that point, rather than do it indirectly by making a second measurement of 280 mm from the pivot.

Finally, where does one get these bulletins, and are they indexed? I have a vague memory of seeing a file on the CD-ROM that I bought for the service and parts manuals, but I could not access all of them and they were not indexed.
 

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I've been banned from worse places than this another (boomerang play on words).. I'll outlive all of you, as ai light another cigar.
Probably the cigar was bought in the age of "twofers".
In speaking of aging, I bought my first Alfa, a Giulietta Spider, in 1965 for $1400. Used it as a daily driver.
:)
 

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Trained (ex)Professional, , 1953-2018 RIP,
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Finally, where does one get these bulletins, and are they indexed?
If you send me a PM, I'll provide them to you.

No, they are not indexed alphabetically by Alfa. But they are indexed by group number. Alfa changed the numbering format of these early info sheets to coincide with the 'new' parts and workshop group number system. Group 21 for example is front suspension. That's where the above info sheet can be found. Go to group 17 for differential stuff, or group 01 for engine, etc.
Click below for a group number list.
 

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