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Discussion Starter #1
I bought my 68 Duetto new - and have had it for 52 years. Along the way it's been many kinds of cars. New it was my graduation present to myself, and my daily driver. Loved the skinny Pirelli Cinturatto 155/1`5's. Later it was my club racer , then a casual SCCA racer ands daily driver - put tape on the headlights and go race on weekends. As that got more competitive and formal, and my career more intense, my little Alfa got to be an occasional car and my big BMW sedan was a DD. That continued thru two 20-year overhauls and lots of sedans, I'm ready for its last and major restoration.

But in many ways going back to the total factory original is in many ways a major degradation in my sweetheart. A spun #2 main bearing and a broken con-rod lead to a 2 liter block (which got its #2 and 4 bearings cross drilled) with its original cable clutch and TX. A 2-liter LSD diff also got my old racing Sliding-Block which kept the excitement of driving on the SoCal mountain roads. Lots of upgrades internal to the engine brought lots of more power.

And so on and so on...

I already know every nut and bolt, the few poly bushings and the difference between the small bushing trailing arms and the later ones. Lots of these are internal, and visual only to an expert. Externally it looks like a bit work original round-tail. Now the 66-67 round tails are climbing in value - at least for the pristine restored ones) I'm struggling to decide on a path forward.

So does anybody have an opinion (HA. As if!) on where I should go?

Robert
 

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IMO (yeah, everyone has one...) anything that would be easy to revert back to 'original' has little effect on resale value. Meaning bolt-on changes - especially if you save the original parts for this potential future owner. But (there's always a but...) it is your car and you should do with it as you please (just be ready for the flack from the purists).

As for the purists, I know too many that start down the road of trying to make a perfect original car and eventually lose their enthusiasm &/or never drive the car. It seems funny to me because 'concours' started out as a sort of beauty contest for custom bodied cars and somehow has morphed into an originality contest.
 

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1984 GTV6, 1973 Berlina, 1987 Milano
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It's your car, build it how how you want it. This might be the last rebuild you do, but it might not.

As long as you don't mess with the body the value will be fine. Mechanical changes can be easily undone. But a rust free body with hood paint is valuable.

I'm constantly revamping my Berlina. My next change is removing the 15x7 wheels and going back to a more stock 14x6 since I mostly use it around town. I can save the big tires for track days.

Sent from my GM1917 using Tapatalk
 

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As long as you don't mess with the body the value will be fine.
ghnl said:
anything that would be easy to revert back to 'original' has little effect on resale value.
I respectfully disagree with that. From my recent experience as an auction seller, I would say that today's buyers primarily want factory-spec cars. Hands-on tinkering is not a thing for the current generation of owner, so modified cars just aren't in high demand. An original car can be easily re-sold in a few years, with little risk of losing money.

Having said that, I'd still vote for 60sRacer to build his Duetto any way he darn well pleases. If he enjoys the process of modifying a car and can appreciate the resulting improvement in performance, then he should just do it. Resale value isn't everything.
 

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I respectfully disagree with that.
I appreciate the respect (whether it is deserved or not...). Let me re-phrase what I wrote. Bolt-on changes have less effect on re-sale value compared to customizations that involve cutting & welding. There, how's that?
 

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Bolt-on changes have less effect on re-sale value compared to customizations that involve cutting & welding. There, how's that?
Sure, I'll buy that!

And yes, a generation ago, a prospective buyer would look at a Duetto with a sliding block and say "wow! I'll pay a premium for that. Even though I wanted a stock Duetto, I can source a "T" arm, unbolt the sliding block and sell it for $$$". But today's buyers want to buy the car, do a couple of Colorado Grands or Copperstates and then re-sell it to acquire another item on their automotive bucket list. The experience of spending a few weekends out in the garage unbolting modifications is a completely foreign concept. So a modified car get's discounted by the cost of paying a professional to put it back to stock. And yes, that cost is lower if everything has been bolted on.
 

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Yes those were the days. Like yourself I have had my '67 Spider for over 50 years and have gone through most of your experiences. Gone are the days of walking into your local Alfa dealers parts department. Of course you could also go to your local BAP/GEON or order parts via Shankle, Alfa Ricombi, etc. All by phone or mail. I decided to return my Spider to stock in 1995, but after a couple years I began to miss all the performance upgrades. Keep the things that make you smile. Resale has never been a reason for changes. I think I can get my $2995 back even if it's in a recycle barrel.
Cheers, Jon
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Hmmm. I have nearly all the things John Shankle ever made for the carburated cars; not all are installed. And I've kept every original Alfa part except the blown-up 1600 cc original motor. But I do have a set of the Alfa Borgo 10.5 CR pistons and liners. One of the SoCal concours scoring manuals accepts anything that would have been contemporary at the age of the car, such as the items in the Alfa AutoDelta/Factory Performance Parts Catalogs. Or the GTA magnesium or aluminum wheels, or the MiniLite wheels (now cloned by Panasport).

BTW - how many remember that Minilites and other rims from a Mustang II are perfect fit for the 65 - 68 108mm by 4 rims for the Alfa 105's?

There are hundreds of such items. Most of which no one would ever notice, except that somehow the car seems peppier...

In fact, the only two items that I'd consider obvious would be headlight and ignition relays, which prevent damage to the 4 to 5 -figure headlight stalks or ignition switches, and the 40 to 80 amp alternator in place of a 25 amp generator/voltage regulator.

Robert
 

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I am in a similar boat...
Bought my '67 GTV in '73. Very original car. It has been my DD, AROSC club time trials, renewed every 12 years or so!
Last time was a color change, hot 1750 motor, trans, clutch, brakes. Still have the original motor and other bits.
It is such a blast to drive, but for best value I would have to refit the stock bits. ???
In any case, anything for sale only has the value that "some fool will pay"
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I bought my 68 Duetto new - and have had it for 52 years...So does anybody have an opinion on where I should go?
Robert, you've had the round tail for 52 years; it has evolved into the car that you want it to be. I think you should just 'go for a drive' and enjoy the car the way it is. You are not likely to sell it after keeping it for so long, are you? I'd like to see pictures of this '68 too. Did you get it through Canada? I didn't think any were imported in 1968?

Either way, you and Not2Old4Toys are to be commended for your long term commitments to these spiders. Anyone else out there with 'long termer'?

I love 101/105Guy's GTV -the color and those wheels; amazing! There was a similar one on BAT a couple years ago (not yours, I guess).

Me, I've only had my '66 Duetto since trading my '75 spider for it in 1984 -36 years ago. I must be the young kid in this group. The 1992 164-S was the only car I've purchased brand new.

Mark
 

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My 1967 Spider and my resto-mod 1976 GTV
Spider has 1750, ate braking, limited slip, alloy wheels. Engine has been balanced and small port.

Cheers, Jon
 

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I've only had my '66 Duetto since trading my '75 spider for it in 1984 -36 years ago. I must be the young kid in this group.
I think I've got you beat by a year; got my Duetto in '83. Acquired it disassembled with no engine, turbina wheels, damage from a rear-ender. I never considered trying to restore it to stock; like 60sRacer, the Shankle and Alfa Ricambi catalogs were my playground back in the 80's. Since my initial build, I have brought it somewhat back toward original, though it still has a 2L engine, Daytona-style wheels and a few other modifications. Doubt I'll move it any further back to its factory specification.

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It is tough to sell after so long a love affair!!Bought the '64 Spider in 1977 and drove it on my honeymoon to the Monterey Historics. Easier now that I got a replacement !:eek:
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Discussion Starter #15
I like the gunmetal Ferrari to the left of the Porche. Might sell the Alfa for that one..... Probably not....

Ironblock: It's a '67 Duetto. Bad typo to list it as a 68. She'll probably pout for a week for that error. I bought it at Otto Zipper Motors in Beverly Hills. Otto was a great Alfa and Ferrarri racer in those days. Couldn't find the edit button to fix that and a few other typos.

Robert
 
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