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Someone local is selling a 4-owner 1991 164L that I’ve seen driven around before. It’s white with saddle interior and aesthetically nice inside & out, very clean. Everything works, heat, cool, power seat, etc. It has Alpine stereo, Bosch Eurospec Headlights, and OZ Ultraleggera 16x7 Black rims. But they also have the original stereo, headlights, and rims. It has 116,000 miles on it but has a Reconstructed Title (valid).

States that the 1st owner was involved in accident that damaged the front right of vehicle but no damage to frame. 2nd owner fixed it. They’ve also stated that there is a small leak somewhere in the power steering system. And the air conditioning belt could be tighter, there’s a squeal for a few seconds that goes away after the A/C is on. Other than that, they say it runs and drives fine.

Assuming everything is ok after I take a look at it, what would you say is a good offer?...especially with the title being reconstructed. Right now their advertised price is WAY over value, even if it had a clean title. If I did get it, I’d most likely only have it for 1-2 years before reselling.
 

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Maybe $1,000. Maybe less.

“What’s it worth?” Is subjective. I place a 100,000+ mile Alfa in the “high school kid first car” category. This means they are assumed to be destined for sacrifice. The very first repair will be $1,000, or more. Tires, brakes, AC pump, cam belt, etc.

Old Alfas not in the collectible class are generally not much valued by potential buyers.
 

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Yea this kid isn’t budging on the price. He thinks it’s worth $6,000!!! :oops: spits water out
 

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Maybe $1,000. Maybe less.

“What’s it worth?” Is subjective. I place a 100,000+ mile Alfa in the “high school kid first car” category. This means they are assumed to be destined for sacrifice. The very first repair will be $1,000, or more. Tires, brakes, AC pump, cam belt, etc.

Old Alfas not in the collectible class are generally not much valued by potential buyers.
Yea this kid isn’t budging on the price. He thinks it’s worth $6,000!!! :oops: spits water out
 

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I place a 100,000+ mile Alfa in the “high school kid first car” category. This means they are assumed to be destined for sacrifice.
Be careful with this statement. My high mileage 164 and Milano are immaculate and well maintained. 100,000 + miles is nothing with proper maintenance and care. A far cry from "high school kid first car" category.
 

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Be careful with this statement. My high mileage 164 and Milano are immaculate and well maintained. 100,000 + miles is nothing with proper maintenance and care. A far cry from "high school kid first car" category.
I would definitely put it under “high school kid first car”, similar to like an older Volvo but that’s not a slight against it. And I agree with 100k+ miles being not much of a concern if it was well maintained and even proof to back it up. But the main thing is that it’s a rebuilt title and 4 owners. It’s not worth $6000 even with a clean title.
 

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Be careful with this statement. My high mileage 164 and Milano are immaculate and well maintained. 100,000 + miles is nothing with proper maintenance and care. A far cry from "high school kid first car" category.
These are subjective questions, and no offense intended. If you look at my signature, you’ll see I’m not new to Alfas, and I’m long past the starry eyed wonder of it all. Supers and Berlinas spent a long time in “just a used old car” category. That’s where 164’s are now. Milanos, maybe a bit better, but even they need quite a degree of superior condition to find a deep-pocketed buyer.

A question most buyers will ask is “why do I want this car?”

If it’s for the possible increasing value of uniqueness and collectibility, that’s just not a 164. If it’s to have a nice, comfortable, reliable daily driver? Hmmmmm. Well..... Maybe? The same $6,000 would buy a lot of newer, and cheaper to keep Japanese cars. I just spent $8,100 for a 1999 Alfa 916 GTV with 44,000 miles. Looks and drives like a new car. I’d worry about the ease and cost of “what’s next” with a high mileage 164. Same mileage on a Toyota, Honda, or Mazda, no worries.
 

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I'll sell you my 91L for half that price. It is currently
1641090
in body/paint shop right now for hood, top and deck redo in poly urethane. I have had it 11 years. Has S engine w/AT and about 220k on chassis. It has the 2005 Euro 916 12v spider Busso engine timing belt and pulleys upgrade with 4k mile on the belt.
 

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I place a 100,000+ mile Alfa in the “high school kid first car” category. "

Not at all. Those not familiar with 164s may think so, but 164s last a very long time in general, esp if the maintenance is done as a responsible owner should do. My 94 LS has 115k miles on it and it is completely sound, everything working, very nice original paint, runs really great. My 91S has 195k miles on it and is still without rust Paint was ok, but repainted after someone in Oregon keyed it), everything works, and the engine just keeps running and running and running, never had the heads off, just a new clutch at 185k miles. Even our 89 MIlano is still as new (except for wear in the driver's seat), not a mark in the very fine original paint except for a few small rock chips in the hood, as usual. Runs like a top, never messed with at all, still very good clutch.

"If it’s to have a nice, comfortable, reliable daily driver?"

Oh, I assure, the 164 can be driven in anger so to speak, blowing off older Alfas without trouble, plus being able to serve as "a nice, comfortable, reliable daily driver", lol.

Don't sell newer (at that time) Alfas short.
 

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164 cars aren’t worth much of anything other than scrap value to be honest. They are a solid teenager car — my son had my auto 95 in high school but he never appreciated it. I’m scrapping my 80k mile LS 5 speed because it needs 3 grand worth of work and I have 6 cars already
 

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People keep thinking because they love their car, and it's been well maintained, that the next owner should feel the same.

What would the finest, low miles, driven only by the Pope on Saturday's, documented maintenance 164 sell for?

I doubt it would make $6k unless we had proof it was the Pope's personal go-for-pizza-at-midnight stealth car.

In other words.... great first car for a teenager.
 

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All right, forget it all.
 

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I'll sell you my 91L for half that price.
I’m in Massachusetts
I place a 100,000+ mile Alfa in the “high school kid first car” category. "

Not at all. Those not familiar with 164s may think so, but 164s last a very long time in general, esp if the maintenance is done as a responsible owner should do. My 94 LS has 115k miles on it and it is completely sound, everything working, very nice original paint, runs really great. My 91S has 195k miles on it and is still without rust Paint was ok, but repainted after someone in Oregon keyed it), everything works, and the engine just keeps running and running and running, never had the heads off, just a new clutch at 185k miles. Even our 89 MIlano is still as new (except for wear in the driver's seat), not a mark in the very fine original paint except for a few small rock chips in the hood, as usual. Runs like a top, never messed with at all, still very good clutch.

"If it’s to have a nice, comfortable, reliable daily driver?"

Oh, I assure, the 164 can be driven in anger so to speak, blowing off older Alfas without trouble, plus being able to serve as "a nice, comfortable, reliable daily driver", lol.

Don't sell newer (at that time) Alfas short.
Being a “teenagers first car” doesn’t mean it’s a bad car or can’t take mileage. It’s just one of those vehicles
 

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Yea this kid isn’t budging on the price. He thinks it’s worth $6,000!!!
Well, sadly, this seller is delusional. He may have spent $6,000 on the thing. But as goats wrote in post #10, "164 cars aren’t worth much". I recently sold my '91 164L 5-speed that was running, registered, California smog legal, .... and got a whole $600 for it. Granted, it was a bit cosmetically challenged, but you get the point.

The low prices that 164's command doesn't mean that they aren't great cars; none of us are panning them. If demo1988 wants one, they're readily available and they provide a lot of car for the money. But you don't need to spend $6,000 to get in the game.
 

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Yep agree. I loved my LS’s. So much i owned almost .5% of all of them sold in USA at one time or another. But they aren’t marketable. Valuable to me in driving emotion, looks, and coolness factor. In the commercial marketplace 164 gets no love for any of this. It’s just the way it is. Like an Alfetta.
 

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The wheels and headlights are cool and should be sold separately. If the timing belt is due or almost due that puts most 164’s upside down nowadays it seems...... :-s
 

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30 year old cars just aren't worth much. If they are limited production maybe. But run of the mill nope. The Alfa 164 was limited production in North America but that's because nobody wanted them. That has not changed. My 164 is for sale at best offer. So far, no offers. Mine us a one owner car with all the servicing records. Only crashed three times....

Just BTW, modern unibodies don't have "frames". Also, a crashed unibody can be restored to as new condition. The body is perforated with alignment holes used by the robots that built it in the first place to align all the structural metal parts. Those holes are permanent. A crashed unibody is put on a laser light rig and pulled back so all those holes line up exactly where they were when the unibody was welded up originally. I do mean exactly as in within micrometers.

Properly repaired unibodies are literally as good as new.
 

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Someone local is selling a 4-owner 1991 164L that I’ve seen driven around before. It’s white with saddle interior and aesthetically nice inside & out, very clean. Everything works, heat, cool, power seat, etc. It has Alpine stereo, Bosch Eurospec Headlights, and OZ Ultraleggera 16x7 Black rims. But they also have the original stereo, headlights, and rims. It has 116,000 miles on it but has a Reconstructed Title (valid).

States that the 1st owner was involved in accident that damaged the front right of vehicle but no damage to frame. 2nd owner fixed it. They’ve also stated that there is a small leak somewhere in the power steering system. And the air conditioning belt could be tighter, there’s a squeal for a few seconds that goes away after the A/C is on. Other than that, they say it runs and drives fine.

Assuming everything is ok after I take a look at it, what would you say is a good offer?...especially with the title being reconstructed. Right now their advertised price is WAY over value, even if it had a clean title. If I did get it, I’d most likely only have it for 1-2 years before reselling.
I bet this is the 164L you are talking about after ready your post this sounds like it: 1991 Alfa Romeo 164 Lusso | eBay
 

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I have mixed feelings about my '91 164S. I love how it looks inside and out, and I really enjoy driving it as my semi-daily commuter and go-to long trip car. Bought it with 118K miles, now up to 170K. It was not that cheap to buy and has cost me a fair bit in maintenance and repairs over the past 7 years; totalled up I've got about $14K sunk into it. To sell it today, I'd be lucky to get $1500.

That said, glad it's in my fleet, but should a major failure occur (like a blown motor or transmission) then most likely it's gonna be gone. By the time it becomes collectible (and it will, eventually) I'll either be dead or incapable of driving anything. So for now, I just enjoy it every day, while it's (mostly) working well. Fine car, poor investment.
 
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