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It measures pressure. Photo in the link looks like it's got 4 sets of tubes and measures, so I'm gonna guess it measures the pressure off of the 4 nozzles (and thus effectiveness of the 4 plungers) of the SPICA pump. I won't even guess about the Swedish thing you're talking about....
 

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I'm thinking that Wes Ingram would score VERY high on this manometer scale - of course, our own John S. (roadtrip) from somewhere in SoDak would probably score OK too!
 

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Discussion Starter #4
sigh. I just took the "manometer" test. I scored somewhere between a 13 year-old-boy and Ellen DeGeneres
 

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It measures pressure. Photo in the link looks like it's got 4 sets of tubes and measures, so I'm gonna guess it measures the pressure off of the 4 nozzles (and thus effectiveness of the 4 plungers) of the SPICA pump. I won't even guess about the Swedish thing you're talking about....
Not exactly, but close. This tool is used to balance the idle circuits on SPICA-equipped engines. It measures the "draw" or vacuum generated at the idle-air ports. The idea is to balance out all four ports for a smooth idle.The unit consists of four mercury manometers in a single case, along with the necessary tubes and fittings. Similar tools were, and probably still are, available in the aftermarket for balancing multi-throat carbs, but these were much simpler, measuring the vacuum mechanically, one port at a time.

While not strictly necessary for Alfa/SPICA maintenance, these are pretty cool tools if you can get past the thought of turning your garage into a hazmat site when it falls off the workbench and spreads mercury everywhere.;)
 

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Thanks for the explanation, Bob. That's a pretty cool little device. My day will end with me being a little less ignorant than I was when it started!
 

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I have used one for years to sync the carbs on my multi cylinder motorcycles but now can no longer purchase the tool or buy the replacement mercury due to government restrictions. I would make sure it had it's full compliment of mercury prior to purchase as you may not be able to replace. I did have a teacher friend who could purchase some mercury but only via the high school she worked for and could not get it for herself. How much did they want for it? I could not get the link to work on my computer.
 

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I have used one for years to sync the carbs on my multi cylinder motorcycles but now can no longer purchase the tool or buy the replacement mercury due to government restrictions. I would make sure it had it's full compliment of mercury prior to purchase as you may not be able to replace. I did have a teacher friend who could purchase some mercury but only via the high school she worked for and could not get it for herself. How much did they want for it? I could not get the link to work on my computer.
You can replace the mercury with any colored liquid that won't damage your engine should it be accidently sucked into the intake - ATF works nicely.:)

Just make sure to dispose of the old mercury properly.
 

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You can replace the mercury with any colored liquid that won't damage your engine should it be accidently sucked into the intake - ATF works nicely.:)
You could, but you'd probably have to put some kind of restrictor orafice in the suction tubes. The difference in viscosity between mercury and ATF is huge. Without a restrictor you'd probably just suck the ATF all the way through the tubes into the motor.

I have a set of "Carb Stix" that I use on the motorcycle. I lent it out and the guy managed to loose all the mercury out of them. After I explained to him that getting replacement mercury is impossible, he figured out a way. He is an HVAC tech and he went through the recycle bin at work, pulled out all the old thermostats he could find, broke them apart and collected the mercury out of them.
 

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NOO!
Don't break up old mercury switches!

You need them to make anti~handing devices or motion activated initiators on certain, um, 'things'.

Yeah, 'things'. That's it 'things'.

Like, um..... like a switch that turns off the lawn sprinklers as the garage door opens.
Or, uhhh, a switch that turns the lights on in a cabinet when the door is used.
Or mabe a switch that works the lights if you have one of those 'drop down' ladder things to get into your attic.
 

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You could, but you'd probably have to put some kind of restrictor orafice in the suction tubes. The difference in viscosity between mercury and ATF is huge. Without a restrictor you'd probably just suck the ATF all the way through the tubes into the motor.

I have a set of "Carb Stix" that I use on the motorcycle. I lent it out and the guy managed to loose all the mercury out of them. After I explained to him that getting replacement mercury is impossible, he figured out a way. He is an HVAC tech and he went through the recycle bin at work, pulled out all the old thermostats he could find, broke them apart and collected the mercury out of them.
You beat me to it I was going to post that I had tried oil but even with restrictors it had air bubles and was difficult to adjust. Working in the medical field I had access to old wall mounted blood pressure guages that were vertical and had mercury in them not the dial type I was able to collect a decent ammount but lent my stash to a friend who spilled it while working on his bike in the dirt and there was no way to reclaim any. He just dug up the dirt mixed it with some quick crete and used it to anchor some fence posts he was puttin up.
 

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It doesn't work on viscosity but on gravity or more properly density. A less dense liquid would require longer tubes. If water was used, they would be 36 feet high.
 

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Have a look at this thread

Not exactly, but close. This tool is used to balance the idle circuits on SPICA-equipped engines. It measures the "draw" or vacuum generated at the idle-air ports. The idea is to balance out all four ports for a smooth idle.The unit consists of four mercury manometers in a single case, along with the necessary tubes and fittings. Similar tools were, and probably still are, available in the aftermarket for balancing multi-throat carbs, but these were much simpler, measuring the vacuum mechanically, one port at a time.

While not strictly necessary for Alfa/SPICA maintenance, these are pretty cool tools if you can get past the thought of turning your garage into a hazmat site when it falls off the workbench and spreads mercury everywhere.;)
Hello members,

Have a look at this thread for more information:
http://www.alfabb.com/bb/forums/carburetors-fuel-injection/39245-weber-synchronization-2.html

Ciao, Olaf
 

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Was the manometer on Craigslist sold? I'd like to add it to my tool collection.
 
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