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It means "quick" or "fast"... Also note that there is a root relation between "veloce" and "velocity"...

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... ‘quick’ would usually translate as ‘presto’.
I don't wish to start an argument, but this is just not correct... The adjectives "quick" and "fast", as in "this vehicle is quick" or "this vehicle is fast", do translate to the adjective "veloce", not the adverb "presto". A vehicle would certainly be "veloce", but never "presto". "Presto", in the context of "quick", refers to "in a hurry", or "quickly"...

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I definitely don't wish to start an argument about this; essentially I agree with what you say--for translating 'veloce' to our English usage. And you're certainly right; a vehicle would never be 'presto'.

It's just that, in Italian, 'quick' wouldn't generally be used as "this vehicle is quick", IMO. That's the only point I was trying to make (not very well, obviously).
 

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Ed,
We are in fact in 100% agreement - While in English we could say "this vehicle is quick", we wouldn't say so in Italian... It's good to know that we can clarify points without arguing.... :) (I'm sure you've seen some of the recent posts in some of the threads! :rolleyes:)

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Enrique,

Tutto d'accordo, tutto amichevole. Better to just translate it as "fast". Now, let's just hope that no one needs a translation of "sprint"...

distinti saluti,
 

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Enrique,

……Now, let's just hope that no one needs a translation of "sprint"...

After she’d broken his heart, he found the medicine to bind his tattered soul, a brilliant red Sprint.

well, sure--synonyms abound. you don't like just plain "fast"?
I like fast, it makes me hungry. Seriously, quick and fast are good descriptive words, however rapid may have a better association with veloce, quick is associated with a very short period of time, such as a quick bat, a quick meal, etc. Whereas rapid has a association with distance, such as a rapid advance, rapid transit, etc. There a musical use of the word veloce associated with rapid. From a translation point of view, quick and fast are both single syllable words, veloce has three, rapid is a bit closer with two syllables
 

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...I like fast, it makes me hungry. Seriously, quick and fast are good descriptive words, however rapid may have a better association with veloce, quick is associated with a very short period of time, such as a quick bat, a quick meal, etc. Whereas rapid has a association with distance, such as a rapid advance, rapid transit, etc. There a musical use of the word veloce associated with rapid. From a translation point of view, quick and fast are both single syllable words, veloce has three, rapid is a bit closer with two syllables

Well, it depends on what you want translation to do. Are you trying to convey the thought in the original language, or are you trying to adapt it to the second language.

If it's the latter, then for "veloce" you can use "fast", "rapid", "swift", or "quick", and I would argue (though not strenuously) that the syllables don't matter much unless you're translating poetry.

But if you're thinking in Italian (as in, what did Alfa mean when it used the term "veloce"?), then "veloce" translates best as "fast", for which other words in Italian don't really exist.

As was previous noted, "quick" doesn't work well in this context. In Italian, "veloce" can indeed translate well as "quick", as in "veloce di pensiero", which would probably translate better as "quickness of thought" than "fast thinking".

In this case, however, we're talking about cars, and in Italian you wouldn't think "the car is quick". You might indeed think "the car is rapid", bit if you did, the word in your mind would probably be "rapido". Similarly, you might think "the car is swift", bit the word in your mind would probably be "celere" (same root as "accelerate").

And that's why I wouldn't agree that 'rapid has a better association with veloce' and it's why I come back to "fast" as the best translation. But, as I say, it depends on what you're looking for in a translation; some people like to play it [you'll pardon the expression] fast and loose.
 

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Ed - no problem, I think of translation as adapting the meaning towards the language being translated into (please pardon my butchering of english). Alfa's are both musical and poetic, as the play is the thing, with the Alfa Romeo Giuilietta being a play on Romeo and Juliet, no labor of love is lost, or loose, using rapid as a descriptive. The best bet might be, as a propper name, no translation is needed.
 

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I want to throw my two lira in-

I have no basis in Italian for this, but the veloce always seemed to mean "speed" to me. Maybe it looked too much like the english word "velocity".. Now, if it is indeed an adjective in the Italian language, then the next closest word might be "speedy".
 

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I thought this thread had died a merciful death a couple of weeks ago. Please don't take this the wrong way, Phil, but what words in other languages seem to mean to you may or may not matter much; what words look like they might mean in another language and what they actually do mean are often quite different.

To pick only the first example that comes to mind, the Italian word accidente seems like it ought to mean 'accident', but it doesn't even come close; incidente means 'accident', while accidente loosely translates as '****!'.

In this case, veloce (adj. or adv.) is certainly related to velocità (n.), which means 'velocity' or 'speed'. Veloce is indeed an adjective in the context of Veloce Spider or Gran Turismo Veloce, which means that 'speedy' is fine, if you happen to like that word. Personally, 'speedy' always make me think of an old Alka Seltzer ad, and I tend to use 'fast' rather than 'speedy' when describing cars, but if you prefer 'speedy' to 'fast', that's just fine. Other than personal preference, though, I wouldn't want to argue that either of the two is any 'closer' to veloce than the other. YMMV.
 

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I thought this thread had died a merciful death a couple of weeks ago. Please don't take this the wrong way, Phil, but what words in other languages seem to mean to you may or may not matter much; what words look like they might mean in another language and what they actually do mean are often quite different.

To pick only the first example that comes to mind, the Italian word accidente seems like it ought to mean 'accident', but it doesn't even come close; incidente means 'accident', while accidente loosely translates as '****!'.

In this case, veloce (adj. or adv.) is certainly related to velocità (n.), which means 'velocity' or 'speed'. Veloce is indeed an adjective in the context of Veloce Spider or Gran Turismo Veloce, which means that 'speedy' is fine, if you happen to like that word. Personally, 'speedy' always make me think of an old Alka Seltzer ad, and I tend to use 'fast' rather than 'speedy' when describing cars, but if you prefer 'speedy' to 'fast', that's just fine. Other than personal preference, though, I wouldn't want to argue that either of the two is any 'closer' to veloce than the other. YMMV.
Ed- No argument at all. That's why I preferenced it with "no basis in Italian".
 

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I thought this thread had died a merciful death a couple of weeks ago. Please don't take this the wrong way, Phil, but what words in other languages seem to mean to you may or may not matter much; what words look like they might mean in another language and what they actually do mean are often quite different.

To pick only the first example that comes to mind, the Italian word accidente seems like it ought to mean 'accident', but it doesn't even come close; incidente means 'accident', while accidente loosely translates as '****!'.

In this case, veloce (adj. or adv.) is certainly related to velocità (n.), which means 'velocity' or 'speed'. Veloce is indeed an adjective in the context of Veloce Spider or Gran Turismo Veloce, which means that 'speedy' is fine, if you happen to like that word. Personally, 'speedy' always make me think of an old Alka Seltzer ad, and I tend to use 'fast' rather than 'speedy' when describing cars, but if you prefer 'speedy' to 'fast', that's just fine. Other than personal preference, though, I wouldn't want to argue that either of the two is any 'closer' to veloce than the other. YMMV.
Ciao 1,6
In my humble Italian opinion I would have to agree with your conclusion that when ALFA chose to describe that model as velove they meant FAST. It's interesting to note however that some would say that the term spider is a mispronounciation of the English word "speeder"
Ciao
 
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