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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
New tie rod ends, fresh alignment, new front pads and rotors (only the second replacement set!) and new front flexible brake lines plus a brake fluid flush and the car handles and brakes like new 164 again.

The car still wears its original front springs and struts with a second set of strut bearings ( maybe third actually) and ball joints. The rear struts and springs are the second set. The rear brakes are still only the first replacement set (second set from new).

These were in fact a quality car with a short list of initial defects, but a serious list nonetheless. In most cases any repair of an initially deficient component has lasted the remaining life of the car so far.

Original steering rack and starter motor. Second alternator fairly recently (first replacement ). Engine uses exactly the same amount of oil as when run in new, exactly, with no smoke except on a cold start after sitting for several days, then only a puff. Nevertheless it still consumes a lot by modern standards !!!
 

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Yeah, Carlo said that those early USA 164s, esp the S, had bad oil rings. When he changes them, the problem goes away.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
My wife finally let me drive "her" Alfa after the renewal of these parts.

Many thanks to Lino at Alfa of Tacoma. He always supplies top quality OEM parts.

The new tie rod ends cure the vague floaty feeling I was experiencing in sequential corners, I thought the rack bushings had gone but they are still fine.

The fresh front brake pads restore the brakes to their new performance. It was getting a tad scary there towards the end of the pad life. New Brembo discs and new flexible brake hoses seem to make a difference also.

My mechanic likes working on the Alfa ( he is now at a Kia dealership but his boss lets him service whatever makes his loyal customer base brings in) and he worked at the Alfa dealership and actually PDI'd this car for me in 1991. So, the work he does is exemplary. The two alignments he has done are perfect. I ask him for zero front toe and rear toe set about halfway within the spec range and it seems to produce the best steering feel and lower tire wear.
 

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"Many thanks to Lino at Alfa of Tacoma. He always supplies top quality OEM parts"

YUp., always been good to me for decades, but enjoy him while you can, as he is aiming at retiring by the end of the year.

"I ask him for zero front toe and rear toe set about halfway within the spec range and it seems to produce the best steering feel and lower tire wear"

That's where I aim for as well. Seems to give lowest tire wear and still decent handling feel.
 

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Thanks Michael, I enjoyed reading about your Alfa experience and hope it is okay to add to your thread. I have had a similar experience with a 1992, 164S purchased new from Paul Spruell Alfa in Atlanta. You are very fortunate to have an excellent mechanic nearby to consistently service your car!

As you know the cars came new with a 3 year 36,000 mile warranty and I hoped never to work on the 'new' Alfa as the 'old' Alfa's (Duetto, Touring Roadster) were enough to keep me busy. Now with just over 130,000 miles, the car has the original starter, alternator, struts, springs, etc. One inner tie rod has had to be replaced as did one set of front rotors and probably the second set of brake pads (first during 36K mi service?), 1 A/C compressor (no cold air now), two water pump failures, one power steering rack (I suspect the 'clear fluid' (not red) added by Express Oil Change may have caused or accelerated the rack failure but have no proof). The "S" still uses one quart of oil per 1,000 miles and has since it was new. The original catalytic converter passed the emissions test again in April, just one more to go! The exhaust system was long ago replaced by a Stebro stainless steel unit (when their quality was top of the market) after two OEM failures within the first 36,000 miles. The headliner is sagging and needs to be replaced (or reglued) and there are a few minor electrical issues (antenna stays up, the top row of switch 'back lights' are out [emergency flashers and suspension buttons], alarm has been turned off due to too many false indications. Even after 23 years the car looks better than most 3 year old cars. All original paint (except one door handle and a mirror base) and interior that is still supple and has very little patina. The car has always been garaged or covered when not in use.
The 'wrench man' hopes to install a new thermostat today to alleviate a minor overheating issue, as it is too hot in Atlanta to drive with the heater on high any longer!

Mark
 

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"The "S" still uses one quart of oil per 1,000 miles and has since it was new"

You are lucky, as I would call that very good. Mine has used a qt per 300-400 miles forever, depending on whether or not it is local shopping driving or highway cruising.

But, you have a 92 not a 91, and my man Carlo says that the 91 cars came with bad rings, evidently mitigated in the next several years, as our 94LS uses no oil at all, same for our 89 Milano.
 

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Possible, but it seems the USA 92s generally don't use oil like the "official" USA 91s, so maybe the change was sometime during the year 91 run, and the "official" USA 91s were actually 90s. I sure wouldn't mind getting 1000 miles per qt.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Mine gets 2,000 km (1,200 miles) to the litre (a bit more than your quart) in summer and 3,000 km (1,800 miles) to the litre in winter, roughly. The engine shows no smoke. I think this is normal since my 1982 GTV6 showed the same consumption. The more amazing thing about the V6 is it doesn't leak any oil, none at all. Not very Alfa like.
 

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My 1992 was built in March of 1992 and I picked it up on March 30, 1993. I found this Passenger Vehicle Identification Manual from 1991 that you can use to decode your Vehicle Identification Number. Unfortunately it does not seem to make a lot of sense. After the Model Year designation 'N' for '92, the assembly plant 1 for Arese or 2 for Naples should appear and I have a 6(?) (the car was built in March so if it were the month, I'd expect a 3) ; then a #2 shows up in the VIN. After that the sequential production number would be 626,1642 (did Alfa make that many 164's)?

View attachment NATB.pdf
It may not leak a lot of oil but it is hard to tell with the power steering rack leaking the old fluid before it was filled with Lucas Power Steering Stop Leak!

Mark-
 

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My 1992 was built in March of 1992 and I picked it up on March 30, 1993. I found this Passenger Vehicle Identification Manual from 1991 that you can use to decode your Vehicle Identification Number. Unfortunately it does not seem to make a lot of sense. After the Model Year designation 'N' for '92, the assembly plant 1 for Arese or 2 for Naples should appear and I have a 6(?) (the car was built in March so if it were the month, I'd expect a 3) ; then a #2 shows up in the VIN. After that the sequential production number would be 61,1642 (did Alfa make that many 164's)?

View attachment 790626
It may not leak a lot of oil but it is hard to tell with the power steering rack leaking the old fluid before it was filled with Lucas Power Steering Stop Leak!

Mark
What is your whole VIN or at least you 6xxxxxx chassis number?
 

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What is your whole VIN or at least you 6xxxxxx chassis number?
xxxxx 33E6N6261624; Charlie the service manager at PSA always used to ask me if I knew the cars serial number. I'd rattle off the 17 digit VIN as he sat there looking at me perplexed. Then he'd ask me to say it again so he could write it down. I don't know why but it just 'stuck'. Many of them have; even some that have moved on...:crying2:

Mark
 
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