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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey all,
Just had a quick question regarding the VVT system on an 84 spider veloce. Where is it located? I have seen the pictures of later cars, where the solenoid is on the front of the valve cover, however that is not present on my car. Any ideas? I don't have my camera right now, but this looks exactly like my engine.
Thanks
 

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Uh, yours is missing. The engine area otherwise appears to be largely unmolested. Does the flat spot on the right front of the cam cover have any holes in it where the VVT would bolt? I suppose it is possible that someone deleted this, and found a cam cover with the molded boss, but undrilled.

Any loose wire hanging down low somewhere that should be connected to the VVT?

You might study the cam to see if it has been a) changed to a different model, b) been retarded someone to produce an acceptable idle but reducing top end HP.
Interesting.
 

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All is well. It ain't missing. There are two styles of VVT's. Our (earlier) cars have a centrifugally activated VVT. The VVT is under the cam cover. The later cars have a solenoid activated VVT. The solenoid is attached to the front right side of the cam cover.
 

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1985

Heres mine on a 1985 Pink cisrcle, ignore the yellow ( from an old post of mine)
Auto part Engine Fuel line Automotive engine part Wire
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
vvt

Okay this makes a lot more sense now. No one ever seems to mention the earlier centrifugal type of vvt.
Thanks!
 

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Okay this makes a lot more sense now. No one ever seems to mention the earlier centrifugal type of vvt.
That's because they are a simpler mechanical system. No solenoid to operate/adjust with electrical contacts/circuit boards to worry about.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
That's because they are a simpler mechanical system. No solenoid to operate/adjust with electrical contacts/circuit boards to worry about.
Sorry, busy weekend. A lot of work. Anyway, so if they're simpler, do they fail less? Is there anyway to check if its working?
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Anyone had any experience converting from the later electronic actuation to earlier mechanical? I've got the heads from both and would like to to run the earlier VVT in the later head. It would be nice to know if the earlier VVT is a "bolt on" converstion to the later intake cam.

If it turns out I need to mess with valve shims anyway (haven't taken a measurement on the later engine yet), I might just use the entire cam + VVT from the earlier engine. Anyone know if those are compatible?

Thanks.
 

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Is there anyway to check if its working?
Yes, if you remove the camshaft. See the description of operation above.

Anyone had any experience converting from the later electronic actuation to earlier mechanical?

Anyone know if those are compatible?
It should be a bolt in operation if you swap the complete camshafts (you can not swap just the VVT device). The cam cover is different on the later VVT engine for the solenoid attachment. So, use the earlier VVT & the cam cover from that engine. Secure the solenoid operating wires - cover any exposed terminals - and tuck it out of the way. Don't cut or remove it so it can be re-used if you or a future owner wants to revert back to solenoid operated VVT.
 

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It should be a bolt in operation if you swap the complete camshafts (you can not swap just the VVT device). The cam cover is different on the later VVT engine for the solenoid attachment. So, use the earlier VVT & the cam cover from that engine. Secure the solenoid operating wires - cover any exposed terminals - and tuck it out of the way. Don't cut or remove it so it can be re-used if you or a future owner wants to revert back to solenoid operated VVT.
Thanks, Eric. I might have used the electronic VVT except that it suffers from the typical failed bushing and I prefer the look of the earlier cam cover. The '86 engine is going in the '84, using the '84's harness and probably its plenum and TPS so the later VVT wiring won't be an issue. Good thing, too, as the later harness was a hash. I guess I will be purchasing some new valve shims, after I swap the cams.
 
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