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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Recently bought a Verde for parts or restoration but when the car was delivered found that the transaxle may have been swapped as the driveshaft and shift linkage were disconnected, the halfshafts were missing and the mount on the rear mount had the bolt only halfway connected. Is there any way to identify a Verde transaxle from the outside such as any external marking or tag? While in neutral, when I turn one rotor the other turns in the opposite direction. If I hold one rotor the other will not turn.

Thanks.
 

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You cannot identify an LSD or otherwise anything about these transaxles without opening them up. No external identifiers.
 

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Easiest way is to pull the diff carrier out and count the teeth. I can't remember off hand the number. But the 3.0 is different from the 2.5's. Rob probably knows.
 

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Verde is a 39 tooth ring gear, 11 tooth pinion. All the Alfetta 2.0 and V6 2.5 were 41 tooth ring gears with 10 tooth pinion except 82/3. 1982/1983 GTV6 boxes had 12 tooth pinion gears.

Ring gears usually marked with a pairing (i.e. 11/39 for Verde).

LSD carriers immediately identifiable when removed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I don't mean to be dense about this, but I'm hoping to avoid having to disassemble the transaxle if possible. I'm more concerned about the limited than the actual gearing. I've been told that with most diffs a test for limited slip is to get both rear wheels off the ground and spin one. If the other spins in the same direction then it is LSD, if the other spins in the opposite direction then it is open diff. Is this not the case with the Milano transaxle?

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I don't mean to be dense about this, but I'm hoping to avoid having to disassemble the transaxle if possible. I'm more concerned about the limited than the actual gearing. I've been told that with most diffs a test for limited slip is to get both rear wheels off the ground and spin one. If the other spins in the same direction then it is LSD, if the other spins in the opposite direction then it is open diff. Is this not the case with the Milano transaxle?

Thanks.
You must disassemble/open the case to determine what transaxle type it is and if there is an LSD.
 

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I don't mean to be dense about this, but I'm hoping to avoid having to disassemble the transaxle if possible. I'm more concerned about the limited than the actual gearing. I've been told that with most diffs a test for limited slip is to get both rear wheels off the ground and spin one. If the other spins in the same direction then it is LSD, if the other spins in the opposite direction then it is open diff. Is this not the case with the Milano transaxle?

Thanks.
By the sounds of it you are already so close to having the diff out anyway. Remove the caliper. 10 or so bolts holding the side on and then slide it out. It's really easy.

The method for spinning the wheel in the air requires preload set in the LSD assembly. Even if it were set that way once, it's likely worn the clutches. These LSD's shouldn't be set with preload.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks to all for helping me with this. One more question. Once I get the unit out how do I tell whether limited slip or not?
 

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Yeah you've got to look inside.

Hi

You said "....the halfshafts were missing.. "

In that case it's easy to see what's inside. On one side (Passenger I think) there's a big cover held on with like 10 or 12 bolts. Drain the fluid and undo those bolts and the differential will come out for inspection. To close it back up, just put the cover back on and re-tighten the bolts. You don't have to measure or shim anything.


Then you said

"... I'm more concerned about the limited than the actual gearing. I've been told that with most diffs a test for limited slip is to get both rear wheels off the ground and spin one. If the other spins in the same direction then it is LSD, if the other spins in the opposite direction then it is open diff. Is this not the case with the Milano transaxle?...

That would be the case for the Milano transaxle about twenty years ago when it was new. The lockup available when it was new was 25%. That number was generated by the clutch discs and shim plates in the LSD. Those are all worn out now. The current lock up is number is 0%.

If you want to restore LSD function you'll need to open up the differential and replace the clutches and so on.

Also the crown gear and the differential are bolted together and can be separated. It's easy enough to open up a Verde transaxle pull out the LSD differential, remove the crown gear from the LSD differential, bolt the crown gear to a NON LSD differential (that is an open differential) that you got from another transaxle, put that open differential in the Verde transaxle and close it up.

You now have an LSD differential that you can rebuild and put in your GTV6 or whatever.

So yeah you've got to look inside.

Bye

Hope this helps.
 
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