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Getting ready to reassemble my 67 duetto. I have front spindles and hubs from a mid 70's spider and interested in converting to ATE. Looking for advice if anyone has done this before and also looking for a rear axle to complete the conversion. Can I use the same master cylinder? Will the ATE calipers work without a booster?
Any advice welcome, did a search and could not find any info.
Jim
 

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Looking for advice if anyone has done this before and also looking for a rear axle to complete the conversion. Can I use the same master cylinder? Will the ATE calipers work without a booster?
I have converted both my '67 Duetto and '66 Sprint GT from Dunlop to ATE calipers. It is a fairly straightforward, bolt-on operation.

Yes, your existing master cylinder will work fine. No, you don't need to add a booster. However, you probably should add a pressure-limiting valve in the rear circuit. I used a valve from an Alfa spider that came with ATE brakes, but others have used aftermarket, adjustable valves.

also looking for a rear axle to complete the conversion
Not clear if this is a "parts wanted" ad, or if you are asking what year/model Alfa is a good donor for an ATE-braked rear axle. If the former, you should specify your location, as you don't what to ship something that common/heavy very far. If the latter, any Spica or Bosch injected Alfa is a good donor. Earlier cars used 4.56 ratio (which is what came in your Duetto), later cars used 4.10. I think the transition happened around 1981. Many prefer the 4.1's for highway driving.

Note that you have to retain your 1600 rear trailing arms. The arms that came on Alfas of the ATE era use a larger diameter front bushing that won't fit your earlier chassis.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for the confirmation. I was thinking that it would be straight forward. I have a lead on a rear axle. Presently sandblasting and painting parts. Original rear trailing arms are in good shape so will use them.
 

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Early Duetto trailing arms are actually the preferred choice. They have a smaller (hence stiffer) rubber bushing on the front end, resulting in a slightly more precise feel. I think its a better choice than using poly bushings on the later arms (bigger bushing). The smaller bushing is much more $$ because of the rarity.

Robert
 
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