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Discussion Starter #1
Just sold for US$ 400K + buyers commision.

Anybody in the room took pictures or wants to comment?

Catalogue description:
Chassis No. 750 105
Engine No. AR00511H00103

TZ-1 chassis 105 was built in July 1965 as a stradale or “street” model. This meant it was equipped with roll-down windows, leather interior, rear bumpers and a touch more sound-deadening materials than the corsa or “race” version. Nevertheless, it was delivered with the higher-tuned twin-plug engine and is believed to have been competitively run by its first owner, Luigi Palmieri of Milan. Mr. Palmieri sold the TZ in 1984 to a Sig. Monzeglio of Turin, Italy, from whom US citizen Fritz Durnberger, purchased the car in 1997. During his ownership, the Alfa was comprehensively restored to a high level. Mr. Durnberger raced the car extensively in vintage events in the US, including numerous appearances in the Monterey Historics at Laguna Seca. It was bought by the vendor in 2001.

The freshly rebuilt twin-plug DOHC 1,600 cc engine performs wonderfully, delivering power through the full rev. range. All mechanical components have been inspected and serviced, including the close-ratio 5-speed gearbox. The TZ-1 is remarkably complete and even includes the original lightweight magnesium bell housing, optional 6" x 15" Campagnola magnesium wheels and the alloy twin plug head. This TZ-1 is offered with the original owner’s manual in its pouch, Italian registration documents and a West Coast vintage-racing logbook. With its well-balanced weight distribution, the TZ-1 is one of the most usable sports racing cars ever built, easy to drive with superb handling – flattering to drivers of average skill and rewarding to an expert. A TZ-1 will enable its new owner to gain admission to practically any vintage circuit race, hill climb or rally in the world, and this example could, with little effort, be equally welcome at all of the leading concours events.

The TZ-1 is certainly one of the most desirable postwar Alfa Romeos and arguably one of the most coveted sports racing cars of the second half of the 20th century. The opportunity to purchase one of these very special cars with a known history is a rare one indeed and should be carefully considered by discerning enthusiast collectors.
 

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Just sold for US$ 400K + buyers commision.

Anybody in the room took pictures or wants to comment?

Catalogue description:
Chassis No. 750 105
Engine No. AR00511H00103

TZ-1 chassis 105 was built in July 1965 as a stradale or “street” model. This meant it was equipped with roll-down windows, leather interior, rear bumpers and a touch more sound-deadening materials than the corsa or “race” version. Nevertheless, it was delivered with the higher-tuned twin-plug engine and is believed to have been competitively run by its first owner, Luigi Palmieri of Milan. Mr. Palmieri sold the TZ in 1984 to a Sig. Monzeglio of Turin, Italy, from whom US citizen Fritz Durnberger, purchased the car in 1997. During his ownership, the Alfa was comprehensively restored to a high level. Mr. Durnberger raced the car extensively in vintage events in the US, including numerous appearances in the Monterey Historics at Laguna Seca. It was bought by the vendor in 2001.

The freshly rebuilt twin-plug DOHC 1,600 cc engine performs wonderfully, delivering power through the full rev. range. All mechanical components have been inspected and serviced, including the close-ratio 5-speed gearbox. The TZ-1 is remarkably complete and even includes the original lightweight magnesium bell housing, optional 6" x 15" Campagnola magnesium wheels and the alloy twin plug head. This TZ-1 is offered with the original owner’s manual in its pouch, Italian registration documents and a West Coast vintage-racing logbook. With its well-balanced weight distribution, the TZ-1 is one of the most usable sports racing cars ever built, easy to drive with superb handling – flattering to drivers of average skill and rewarding to an expert. A TZ-1 will enable its new owner to gain admission to practically any vintage circuit race, hill climb or rally in the world, and this example could, with little effort, be equally welcome at all of the leading concours events.

The TZ-1 is certainly one of the most desirable postwar Alfa Romeos and arguably one of the most coveted sports racing cars of the second half of the 20th century. The opportunity to purchase one of these very special cars with a known history is a rare one indeed and should be carefully considered by discerning enthusiast collectors.


Seems cheap for one of the better TZs around. Looks like all but the very rare and desireable Ferraris are taking a pretty big hit..
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Sounds OK for me.
Nice example, no racing history.

TZ is a great car but it seems the market does not think it is a baby GTO.

Regards.
Cris.-
 

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The description of TZ 750 105's history is incorrect.

The lesson to be learned from the above sales description of the 1965 GIULIA TUBOLARE ZAGATO (TZ) #750 105's history is that one can not trust so called trustworthy experts to at least transcribe the ownership history that has been well known for decades and was even listed in the Minerbi TZ book. This TZ has one of the most undisputed and clearest ownership histories in the world. Mr. Vito Spinelli bought this car in Italy in about 1972 and imported it into Vancouver, Canada. Fritz Duernberger bought it from him shortly thereafter. Fritz raced #105 from 1974 to the late 1980's in various Alfa Romeo Club events, historic races at Westwood (near Vancouver, British Columbia), Seattle, Portland, Sears Point, and Laguna Seca. Fritz, being a first class machinist, prepared the TZ so well that he could rely on getting him home after DRIVING HIS TUBOLARE OVER 1000 MILES TO AND FROM EVENTS, AS WELL AS PARTICIPATING IN THEM. His reputation for preparing. presenting and driving his cars was legendary among Alfa Romeo historic racers. While he enjoyed driving the tricky handling TZ, he felt that the historic CARS were to be showcased to the public, NOT THE DRIVER/OWNER. The Tubolare came into his hands in dark blue with really wide flares and over 7" wide after market wheels. Initially, Fritz bought some 15" Campagnolo TZ wheels and left only a hint of flares. Jess Pourret wrote a letter complaining about the unoriginal appearance of #105 to Thoroughbred and Classic Car magazine after it was featured in a Pebble Beach article and a full page photo in 1976?. A few years later, Fritz had asked Ed Arnold, the local alumi(ni)um artist, to repair the flares and the tired, corroded metal, and to paint the bodywork in Alfa 501 red while Fritz refurbished the mechanical parts. The TZ had led an active life, so one winter Fritz and his wife Teresa had wet-sanded the CELLULOSE paint over 15 times before the paint was up to his standards. Fritz got his immaculate TZ ready for the 1985 Monterey Historics, where Alfa Romeo was the featured marque to celebrate its 75 years of history, and Fitz's hero, Juan Manuel Fangio, was invited to be the guest of hono(u)r at the Alfa Romeo drivers' dinner. Alas, tragedy struck. After a hot day at Laguna Seca, as he was heading to the dinner in Carmel, at an intersection the setting Sun shone into his eyes as he was turning, and in an instant the right front of the TZ smashed into a traffic island. He was totally devastated; the thousands of hours of work to turn out PERHAPS THE BEST, CONCOURSE RESTORED TZ IN THE WORLD was all a shattered dream. The next day he straightened out the damaged bodywork and the ripped suspension in the pits so that he could drive it back to Vancouver; but he could not race. In some photos of the line up of 6 TZ's in Laguna Seca, you can see the ****-eyed TZ. Eventually, Fritz got everything fixed. However, one got the impression that his attachment to #105 was never the same again. So, after almost twenty years of custodianship he was hoping that someone else would lovingly look after it. It was not hard to find a purchaser, but to Fritz's great disappointment the new owner wanted it not as a show car/racer, but as an out and out racer, so the immaculate bodywork and lovingly outfitted Conolly leather interior were wasted for that purpose. Dozens of other TZ's could have been bought for that purpose for a fraction of the price. C'est la vie, c'est l'amour, c'est la merde! I hope the new owner will appreciate one of the best restored, genuine TZ's. As a last point, I WOULD SUGGEST EVEN TOP EXPERTS CHECK THE FACTS BEFORE PUBLISHING ANYTHING, AND HAVE IT PROOF READ BY A COUPLE OF SIMILAR EXPERTS. An unfortunate example of what can happen, happened to Pat Braden about ten years ago when he wrote an article (in European Car or Sports Car International) about TZ2's. He described the above #750 105 as being a TZ2 because he did not check his facts. If it can happen to an Alfista of Pat's stature, it can happen to anybody.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
CN36,

Thanks for your post.

Catalogue descriptions are just that, a description to sell a car.
One has to be always carefull, especially when buying a car.

Anyway, s/n 750105 seems to be a good buy.

Regards.
Cris.-
 

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Chris,
Getting ready for Retromobile?
Have you seen any results from sales of GTA's?

Saludos a todos!
 

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I was at the Gooding auction (a really fine event BTW) and watched the TZ go across the block. It took a while for an opening bid to be given, and I don't think there was much interest in the room, or else people were not sure of what it was. Once some phone bidders got in on the action then the auctioneer really worked it hard to get the bids up to the reserve.

It is funny how things appear different depending on your perspective. A TZ-1 would be the star of an Alfa meet, but when it was surrounded by the truly spectacular cars at Gooding, it seemed almost "pedestrian".

Arno Leskinen
AROC-USA National Concours Chair
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1972 Lancia Fulvia 1.3S
 

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FYI, I just posted pictures of the car from about the time it came to Canada in this thread.
 
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