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Discussion Starter #1
I was spending time with the Spider, trying to get all the lights working.
I installed a new working turn signal flasher, and was suprised when nothing flashed. I put my voltmeter across the fuse for the turn signals and saw I was losing half a volt through the fuse.
I cleaned the fuse and holder, no change. Then ran a wire with 2 alligator clips to bypass the fuse. Turn signals and four ways worked perfectly. I ain't seen anything like that before in my life!
Anybody got an idea what the h*** is happening? A fuse acting as a resistor?
All I did was clip a wire to the top terminal and bottom terminal....then it worked... I didn't even take the fuse out! Any ideas?
Thanks
 

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A voltmeter doesn't lie. Replace the fuse. I have seen many fuses that looked perfect but metered badly and were the source of the problem.
 

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The fuse might be bad and the terminals might be loose, even if it doesn't look that way. Try squeezing the top and bottom copper parts onto the fuse (preferably through some insulation and avoiding short circuits). If this improves the circuit, then remove the fuse and squeeze them again so that when you reinstall the fuse, it sits tight within the copper parts.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Cleaned the fuse block THOROUGHLY...took more effort than I thought...but now it's good.
What is the opinion on dielectric grease in the fuse block?
I thought it would act as an insulator, but I was never officially told that, just formed that opinion from installing electric devices and having the instruction specifically state not to use it on connections.
 

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I use dielectric grease on many connectors. It is funny stuff, it neither acts as a conductor or an insulator (as long as the metal connections are making good contact) but it protects against corrosion.

If your Spider has the bullet type fuses plan to replace them every few years even if they look OK. Somehow that type of fuse fails to pass electrons when they get old. The blade type fuses are usually long lasting but the contact do get loose & can corrode. Sometimes simply yanking them out and shoving them back in helps - probably scrapes off a bit of corrosion.
 

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Resistance is futile.

What you are seeing is pretty common with these old fuses. I cleaned the fuse block to try and get my headlight rh low beam to shine, and also the rh turn signal. No luck. I put in a good used turn signal switch assembly, and still no luck. I replaced the old fuses, which looked OK, and viola! I got the headlight back.

Later on I cleaned the ground on the block- sanded all the loop connectors and cleaned/sanded the mounting place on the block. My intermittient wipers worked again lol. Clean your grounds too!
 
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