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Discussion Starter #1
Hello All,

I am about to embark on replacing all the rear suspension bushings (well, all except the Trunion to body bushings).

Question. Shown as #2 below is the washer.

Both of mine spin freely. Both are in tact but spin.

Is that right or do they need to be replaced?

If they do, I plan on buying the poly type, slit them and install them.

Thanks for the help.

Vin

trunion to body.jpg
 

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You will find that the poly replacement ones also spin.
If your originals are intact, I would leave them there.
 

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don't know about 'spining ' freely. but they are nylon,, and do wear out.. i got a sheet of 1/8" thick polly and cut 2 out, easy to do, to instale them.. just cut a slice in one side, slip them on...i think i have some of that sheet left,if you want i can make you a set.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
don't know about 'spining ' freely. but they are nylon,, and do wear out.. i got a sheet of 1/8" thick polly and cut 2 out, easy to do, to instale them.. just cut a slice in one side, slip them on...i think i have some of that sheet left,if you want i can make you a set.
Hi bianchi1,

That would be great!

Sending you a PM.

Vin
 

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Spin or no spin, more importantly is the gap between washer and bushing end of both sides combined 1mm/.040" or less?

If so, you're OK, if not, gotta get something to take up the slack as the trunion may be allowed to move too much side to side which in turn will cause funny things to happen in the twisty bits.
 

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I don't think it is tragic if there is more than .020 on each side.
A lot of the early 105s I've had handled fine and when I looked, the original spacer had disintigrated and fell out. The factory ones on early cars is some kind of composite matl.
And I have never even seen any of those factory shims on a stock car or even offered for sale.
If you are doing LeMans, I would set it up tighter.....
 

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Hello All,

I am about to embark on replacing all the rear suspension bushings (well, all except the Trunion to body bushings).
You may want to check that the reaction trunion rotates freely in the trunion-to-body bushings. The end of the trunion and inner sleeve of the busing can corrode together over time. It's not an interference fit, and the reaction trunion should swing up and down like the trailing arms.


Thanks,
Alex
 

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In my opinion the prompted gap from Alfa must be kept in the proper tolenance if you want a precise steering and not some "rear" steering, too. So,as for the U shaped metal washers marked as "S" in the above picture, I guess was and is essential. I heard from an old alfa mechanic that later service manuals didnt show them up to avoid any side effects from welding them on the T bar ( sparks near gas tank , etc...). Todays, we want the best from our cars and will overcome this with the proper attention. I was lucky to discover some NOS and perfect of these U shape special washers in different sizes. If someone needs a pair or more of them let me know via PM.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
You may want to check that the reaction trunion rotates freely in the trunion-to-body bushings. The end of the trunion and inner sleeve of the busing can corrode together over time. It's not an interference fit, and the reaction trunion should swing up and down like the trailing arms.


Thanks,
Alex
Hi Alex,

I'm not a mechanic but love to work on my car!

I'm not 100% sure of what part should rotate freely around what part?

Is is possible to use the drawing above to describe?

Thanks for the heads up!

Vin
 

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Discussion Starter #12
You may want to check that the reaction trunion rotates freely in the trunion-to-body bushings. The end of the trunion and inner sleeve of the busing can corrode together over time. It's not an interference fit, and the reaction trunion should swing up and down like the trailing arms.


Thanks,
Alex
Ok,

I re read again and I think this is what you are saying?

Trunion rotate freely.jpg

If yes, would I be able to check that without pulling the whole Trunion bar out?

Remove the 3 bolts that hold the trunion to body and try to rotate it?

Thanks for the help.

Vin
 

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Hi Alex,
I'm not a mechanic but love to work on my car!
+1, and I'm afraid it shows :)

I'm bad at trying to explain this sort of thing, but here goes. The ends of the reaction trunion which attaches to the body (item 3 in the diagram) have rod-like metal protrusions which slip into the bushings (which are inside #1 in the diagram). The fit between #3 and the bushings is snug, but not a press fit. You can easily push the bushing over the protrusions, and they should rotate freely.

Clear as mud?

Thanks,
Alex
 

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I don't think you are right on this.....
The big bush is a press fit on the 'peg' of the arm. If the arm rotates inside the bush, the peg will wear and get sloppy, which never happens. Rotating force is taken by the big rubber bush, the same as the trailing arm bushes which are locked in when you tighten them.
 

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Hi

I know this is an old thread, but can someone confirm if the reaction trunnion end bushes should be a pressed fit or simply slide on.

They rotate freely on my GTV but not on my spider? which is correct.

I assume if they are pressed on they must be pressed on at a precise angle to allow the end bush housing to mate up to the 3 holes in the chassis.
 

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I don't think you are right on this.....
The big bush is a press fit on the 'peg' of the arm. If the arm rotates inside the bush, the peg will wear and get sloppy, which never happens. Rotating force is taken by the big rubber bush, the same as the trailing arm bushes which are locked in when you tighten them.
This is how I understand it. We're replacing mine, and it seems important that the angle of the trunnion to the end cups is correct, otherwise the torque load will lift or push down the diff. Can anyone tell me what the angle should be, when pressing the bush/end cup onto the trunnion bar?
 
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