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Yesterday at the fuel shop i found an original Triumph Dolomite Sprint in very good condition. I am really thinking to buy this car for a second project. The Sprint version of the Dolomite is a rather rare car with some nice technical innovations for the period, like Spen King's 16V cylinder head. The valves were operated by only one camshaft!!


I copy from Wikipedia:

Although the Dolomite proved to be both refined and rapid, Competitors such as the BMW 2002 had a performance advantage which was costing Triumph dearly, both in terms of sales and prestige. To remedy this, Triumph unveiled the Dolomite Sprint in the summer of 1973. A team of engineers led by Spen King developed a 16 valve cylinder head with all of the valves being actuated using a single camshaft rather than the more normal DOHC arrangement. The capacity was also increased to 1998cm³ , and combined with bigger carburettors the output was upped to 127 bhp. This vehicle has a claim to be the world's first truly mass-produced multi-valve car, and the design of the cylinder head won a British Design Council award in 1974. Performance was excellent, with the 0–60mph dash taking around 8.4 seconds, with a maximum speed of 119 mph. Trim was similar to the 1850, with the addition of standard alloy wheels (another first for a british production car), a vinyl roof, front spoiler and lowered suspension. By now seats were in cloth on the 1850, and these were also fitted to the Sprint. Automatic transmission and a limited slip differential were optional, as was overdrive on early models, although this later became standard.





What do you think? Is it worth to "break" the Italian spirit? :confused:
 

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The problems with Triumphs are: Poor quality due to low machining standards and worker strikes, etc. and Lucas.

Otherwise great cars. My parents used to specialise in Triumphs and it's amazing how smooth a 6 cylinder Triumph motor can be if you actually balance it somewhere near close ... which Triumph should have done.

If Triumphs were built as well as old Rovers or BMW's they would still be here as designs were alright.
Pete
 

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Yesterday at the fuel shop i found an original Triumph Dolomite Sprint in very good condition. I am really thinking to buy this car for a second project.
If the car is a fixer-upper, I'd stay away. But if it is a good running car, I'd say try it out and see how you like driving it. If you like it enough to buy it, put at least 1,000 miles on it before throwing money at it.
 

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I have no experience with the car. There is an Alfa connection with the name (from Wikipedia)
"The company hit financial problems however and in 1936 the Triumph bicycle and motorcycle businesses were sold, the latter to Jack Sangster of Ariel to become Triumph Engineering Co. Ltd. [1]. Healey purchased an Alfa 2.3 and developed an ambitious new car with an Alfa inspired Straight-8 engine called the Triumph Dolomite."
I've wrote a little about the Healey-Alfa connection through Count Lurani in the Car Identification thread posted by carlo that uncovered the Riva.
Apparently 20,000+ of the car you are looking at were built were built, there is an owners commmunity on the web and British Heritage has parts. It isn't going to handle, run or brake like a Guilia/Berlina sedan. The claim about being the fastest multi-valve production car at the time obviously doen't include the Jensen-Healey. The question is do you have time for the project it might be?
 

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Jensen-Healey's are not fast ... an MGB will out pace one on the track (well I have).
Pete
 

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Jensen-Healey's are not fast ... an MGB will out pace one on the track (well I have).
Pete
My business partner bought a Jensen-Healey new back in the day, I got to use it regularly, weight was about 1950lbs with 140HP, 0-60 8 seconds,the stock engine, lotus 2liter 4 valve per cylinder DOHC. The MGB was not even close, you must have had a good day.

PSS - The Jensen-Healey GT (coupe) kinda like a Volvo ES1800 had a 250lbs weight penalty, they came out near the end of the run
 

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My business partner bought a Jensen-Healey new back in the day, I got to use it regularly, weight was about 1950lbs with 140HP, 0-60 8 seconds,the stock engine, lotus 2liter 4 valve per cylinder DOHC. The MGB was not even close, you must have had a good day.
I guess not all drivers are equal :) ... because that MGB (which was standard BTW, except for MGB v8 lower inner front suspension bushes) used to also out pace many Alfa Romeos, yep even 1750s and 2000s GTV!!!

Thus there is a difference between on paper performance to on track performance ... which is also why usually the 105 series Alfa Romeo is pretty quick on the track, but magazine article wise is relatively slow.

I used to knock MGB's ... but no longer after racing one for a season. Not as pathetic as their specification makes them out to be. I reckon you could definitely make one that would push a GTAm ... as buy the time you pushed the motor out to 2000cc you could be way over 200hp, remove some weight, add a few extra links to the rear suspension, plus big brakes and it would be a rocket.
Pete
 

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The TR4 (and probably the TR3) engines, were tractor engines, FWIW.
 

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Didn't Saab use a version of this engine in some of their cars in the late '70s / early '80s? Was the 99 turbo one?
 

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The Dolomite 16V engine was new and won a design award in the UK. It was used in the TR7 but without the 16V heads. In a curiously swedish way the Saab version was mounted back to front in the Saab installation.
 
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