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So I'm looking to replace the main transmission mount as its in pretty bad shape according to the alfa mechanic I went to recently. I've been trying to find the part to buy, but I have no idea what it looks like! I've found like 3-4 different parts that all claim to be what I am looking for. I would like to get under the car and look but I haven't had a chance to yet. If anyone could offer either a part number or a picture I would be very grateful! Thanks all.
 

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Richard Jemison
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Transaxle mounts.

There is two designs for the 2 front mounts fortransaxle cars. One pair for Alfettas, and one for the V6 cars (GTV6/Milano.

Call Centerline give them the car description and they will send you the correct pair.

The rear mount is the same for both car types.
 

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Transaxle mounts.

There afre two designs for the 2 front mounts for transaxle cars. One pair for Alfettas, and one for the V6 cars (GTV6/Milano.

Call Centerline give them the car description and they will send you the correct pair.

The rear mount is the same for both car types.
Hey RJ,
I'm just going through this now, because I am putting my Milano de-Dion & transaxle into my new GTV6 (1986)

I knew there were some small differences in them but having both sets of parts in front of me allowed me to actually take some measurements.

Milano's use 15mm tall spacers to space down the de-Dion cross member, but then they use the transaxle mount that has an extra plate welded to the bottom. That plate spaces the transaxle 5 mm higher than the older transaxle mount.

GTV6's use 10mm spacers to space down the de-Dion cross member, but then the transaxle mounts are shorter by 5 mm.

So the result of these differences are that the transaxle winds up at the same height in both chassis's.

The only front transaxle mounts available for the transaxle cars are the taller Milano style, if you wanted to have the transaxle at the factory height for a GTV6 you would need to grind off the tack welds and remove the spacer plate on the taller mounts.

Greg
 

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Richard Jemison
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For one, why show a stripped 5th gear in a thread that in no way contributed to that?

Now to transaxle mounts and the cross member spacers.

The Alfa concoction for the deDion assembly is by design an "active" suspension component. The position of the triangle`s mount, relative to the car`s roll center results in a thrust angle change when the car is leaning (hard cornering). To increase (?) the amount of thrust angle change you lower the center point of the mount at the triangle. To reduce it you raise that centerpoint. Easily done by removing the spacer between the chassis and cross member. (Or fabricating a spherical bearing mount placing it where you want it)
From experience with my GT2 GTV6 raising that "pivot point" with a non flexing sprerical bearing locator, results in far more stable braking and trail braking from speed.
Removing the spacers will require you either place them under the cross member to take up space on the factory bolt as it`s thread length is insufficient and you will strip the built-in threaded plate, or use shorter bolts.
 

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For one, why show a stripped 5th gear in a thread that in no way contributed to that?

Now to transaxle mounts and the cross member spacers.

The Alfa concoction for the deDion assembly is by design an "active" suspension component. The position of the triangle`s mount, relative to the car`s roll center results in a thrust angle change when the car is leaning (hard cornering). To increase (?) the amount of thrust angle change you lower the center point of the mount at the triangle. To reduce it you raise that centerpoint. Easily done by removing the spacer between the chassis and cross member. (Or fabricating a spherical bearing mount placing it where you want it)
From experience with my GT2 GTV6 raising that "pivot point" with a non flexing sprerical bearing locator, results in far more stable braking and trail braking from speed.
Removing the spacers will require you either place them under the cross member to take up space on the factory bolt as it`s thread length is insufficient and you will strip the built-in threaded plate, or use shorter bolts.
Thread High Jack

I have the uniball bearing in both GTV6 de-Dions and have the triangle spaced up in the cross member. The Giubo diameter at 7000 RPM plus increases enough to actually rub on the transmission tunnel so I don't think I can space anything up without moving a lot of metal.

I also built a reinforcing girdle for the clutch cover which also makes for less flexibility in moving things up.

I always felt that the transaxle cars are not nearly as good as the 105 / 115 race cars under threshold braking. They tend to unload the rears and dive more regardless of spring rates. But I don't have any data to back that up - just my experience.
 

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Richard Jemison
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Thread High Jack

I have the uniball bearing in both GTV6 de-Dions and have the triangle spaced up in the cross member. The Giubo diameter at 7000 RPM plus increases enough to actually rub on the transmission tunnel so I don't think I can space anything up without moving a lot of metal.

I also built a reinforcing girdle for the clutch cover which also makes for less flexibility in moving things up.

I always felt that the transaxle cars are not nearly as good as the 105 / 115 race cars under threshold braking. They tend to unload the rears and dive more regardless of spring rates. But I don't have any data to back that up - just my experience.
They tend to unload the rears and dive more regardless of spring rates. But I don't have any data to back that up - just my experience.
That is due to the overall angle (Back to front) of the triangle. It is angled upward normally which increases dive. Alfa`s triangle is a strange way to locate the rear.If you want more "anti-dive" and "anti-squat" it`s front must be several degrees higher unlike typical (Alfa) rear ends where with horizontal lower control arms and downward facing center arm (as on panhard located diffs, not the high factory trunion) give you anti-squat in acceleration and anti-dive during braking.
The lower the race car the rear axle center will stay at it`s fixed height position based on tire height. If you lower the car enough the angle should be easy to raise enough. in the cross member. My old GT2 GTV6 was extremly low, this was likely why raising the cross member made braking better.

Section the area on the cross member where the front mounts attach and drop them down into the cross member as much as there is clearance for...
 

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So I'm looking to replace the main transmission mount as its in pretty bad shape according to the alfa mechanic I went to recently. I've been trying to find the part to buy, but I have no idea what it looks like! I've found like 3-4 different parts that all claim to be what I am looking for. I would like to get under the car and look but I haven't had a chance to yet. If anyone could offer either a part number or a picture I would be very grateful! Thanks all.
Attached a photo of what a new rear upper transmission bushing looks like installed... it is between and above where the rear inboard brakes are located...
1604636
 

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Not very nice. Thread excerpts get emailed out even if you edit them. The question was answered. The thread high jack was warned. I try to be helpful when I can. Have a good day.

EB101 replied to a discussion you are following at Transmission/transaxle mount
I apologize that a few Fu tards hijacked your thread, but the old senile ****y dicks got to get their 2 cents in whenever they can.... I attached a photo of what a new rear upper transmission bushing looks like installed... it is between and above where the rear inboard brakes are located...
View Discussion View All Following
 

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Factory parts numbers:
605.21958
60521958
605-21958
 

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I am sure the 5mm difference will be fine unless you are looking for a buttery 5th gear.....

View attachment 1604290

Wow - that gear is lightened/turned down close to the root of the teeth. I wonder if that contributed to the failure? Looks like the lathe bit that was doing the lightening needs replaced too. What's the story there? I had a 5th gear failure on one of my Milanos that looks somewhat similar to yours, but I suspect it was from a bad input shaft bearing at the intermediate flange in combo with insufficient torque on the main nut - that may have allowed the mesh to walk apart. No warning about failure, just happened. Someone had been in that transaxle before and I suspect further that the nut was not torqued properly.

For new top transaxle mounts, I use the ones from Centerline. They seem to be high quality - I suspect same manufacturer as original - but I use a bit of Permatex gray to install them. I have observed that in some instances, they seem a little looser than originals and I don't know if this is from the case corrosion that was present or if the new mounts are a little smaller in diameter. The Permatex makes install easy and keeps it in place well once cured. I also use some rubber washers/shims on either side of the mount to keep it centered in the body. I have observed these top mounts shifted to one side on some cars - on my cars the Permatex/ shims combo seems to keep things stable and centered. On a couple of low mile original cars I've observed rubber shims in place in those locations - maybe someone has a parts diagram showing this.

On my track car there was a Delrin bushing in that top mount location and seemed to work well.
 

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Wow - that gear is lightened/turned down close to the root of the teeth. I wonder if that contributed to the failure?
Appears that way, bearings were all in good condition and there was literally no movement on either of the shafts. Perfectly snug. No other gears harmed, well except obviously reverse needed replaced since 5th/rev are on the same gear.

Looks like the lathe bit that was doing the lightening needs replaced too. What's the story there?
Car came to me that way, I knew the gears had been lightened, not sure why that one was the only gear that looked like that...
Maybe who ever worked on your transmission also worked on mine..... lol

I had a 5th gear failure on one of my Milanos that looks somewhat similar to yours,..... No warning about failure, just happened.
Same for me... cruising along in 5th going about 80-85 and that's all she wrote. I pasted a link for a video of when it happened, you can hear at the 15 second mark where 5th went. My car is pretty loud, it took me a few seconds to figure out what I was hearing, then I got kicked out of 5th, never could get back in... good times


For new top transaxle mounts, I use the ones from Centerline. They seem to be high quality - I suspect same manufacturer as original - but I use a bit of Permatex gray to install them. I have observed that in some instances, they seem a little looser than originals and I don't know if this is from the case corrosion that was present or if the new mounts are a little smaller in diameter. The Permatex makes install easy and keeps it in place well once cured. I also use some rubber washers/shims on either side of the mount to keep it centered in the body. I have observed these top mounts shifted to one side on some cars - on my cars the Permatex/ shims combo seems to keep things stable and centered. On a couple of low mile original cars I've observed rubber shims in place in those locations - maybe someone has a parts diagram showing this.
I used Centerline's bushing as well. It definitely went in a lot easier than it was getting it out... It still required a few taps with a deadblow to get it into place. The thought was over time that it would settle into place and get tighter. I didn't use any permatex and no shims since there were none there when we took it out. We felt very confident that we got it aligned straight and having the transmission jacked right to the perfect height made getting the transmission in place as well as getting the cross member, spacers and its associated bolts into place very easy... Test drive afterwards went very well. New fifth gear, new clutch, and rear brakes all work very good. Hopefully this chapter is done and I can move onto the next projects ... shimming the starter, replacing the radiator, re-welding the custom sway bar mounts... I don't think it will ever end...
 
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