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1966-2013
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I take it you spun up the collar and slug yourself?

Nice bit of kit. :thumbsup:

Care to share some dimensional drawings, or are you gonna just make a few and sell them?

(I presume you're going to take an extra hour or two and paint the arms now? :) )
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Hi Tifosi,

I actually had an engineering place make them for me, big $$ so I'm hoping to rent the tools out to people in the club t recover some of the cost. I decided to make the tool because I got quoted $150 per bush to remove and replace the bushes that i was suppling.
I will clean and paint with por-15 some other night. i wanted to replace all the bushes on the car first before i opened the can of paint. Just finished about an hour ago. I was replacing the bushes in the A frame and found that the felt has dried and deteriorated, i will have to buy some today and make them up. Question for you, should the middle part of the bush turn like a bearing would? the old one turn but the new ones don't.

Rich
 

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1966-2013
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It should have twist flex, but not actually turn.

It's sorta like the rear bushes you put in, only there's a kind of ball shape inside the housing and it's then packed with compressed rubber. (there's a picture of one cut in half somewhere in this section of the forum)

So it shouldn't move like it's a bearing, at least until the suspension arms are playing against it, and even then it really shouldn't be turning inside much at all. (part of the reason why the suspension has to be laden before tightening the lower arms)
 

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1966-2013
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I got nuthin' specific here.

Though the upper arm to chassis, which is the same size bolt diameter, is listed at 79-98ft/lbs 108-134N/m. (thread pitch is different though IIRC, and there's that cut out section on the lower bits, so you might want to go a bit lower)

Make sure the washers face the correct direction when you put it back together.

BTW, you can even use one of the lower bushings to upgrade/replace the upper one if you want something a bit beefier up there.
 

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Thirteen minutes! That means you have time to come and do mine!

:D :D :D

Seriously, though, I'm keeping an eye on this thread; rear bushings are among the things I haven't tackled yet, and I can't imagine the PO ever did, either.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Hi Tifosi,

I went back in the garage and had another look at the bush and nut again and determined that it not was necessary to torque the nut as it only has limited thread, mean that if you tighten it all the way makes no difference because of the limited thread (no extra pressure on the arm). So i have tighten it all the way but nut hard then i just bent back the lock washer.
As for the upper arm, i have a new adjustable arms that i purchased on my holiday in Switzerland.

Hi Farace,

I wouldn't mind another holiday:cool:. This tool makes it so easy, initially I drilled out the rubber rather then burning it and tried to use a hack saw which took about an hour and i still couldn't get it of using a chisel.
Even with using a 6 tonne press the initially give was a loud POW, I think i woke up the neigbours (it was about midnight :D.)

Rich
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Farace,

Here is another picture of the limited number of thread, this also shows the wash that Tifosi is talking about, it is in the correct direction.


Rich
 

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Hi All,

Just finished replacing all 4 bushes on my trailing arms in 13 minutes with my new tool that I had made.
:rolleyes:Ok hot shot - be at my house 7am this Saturday with your "Jeep Water pump" installation tool.


;):)
 

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My autobooks manual says the upper is 79.5 to 98.7 lb/ft, it doesn't have a measurement for the lower, now this was the eighth edition (1978) and shows the spherical bushing used in the lower also used in the upper, not the later rubber type in the upper, so I guess the lower is the same as the upper? I'll check my Intereurope manual, which is at home and post tomorrow.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Hi Rogerspeed,

Guys I am talking about the nut in the following picture. I have the upper and lower wishbone torque setting, by the way the setting I have for the lower wishbone shaft to cross-member is 40.5 lb/ft or 5.6/5.9 kgm.

Rich
 

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Ok, the nut in the photo is the lower wishbone arm to shaft, it is, on the 105 cars, technicaly the same joint as the "upper wishbone rear arm to body" which is can be refered to as the "upper balljoint arm to body" which I what referenced in my previous post. Anyway still looking for the number.
 

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1966-2013
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Ok, the nut in the photo is the lower wishbone arm to shaft, it is, on the 105 cars, technicaly the same joint as the "upper wishbone rear arm to body" which is can be refered to as the "upper balljoint arm to body" which I what referenced in my previous post. Anyway still looking for the number.

If it's technically the same, then this should apply without issue.
 

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It should have twist flex, but not actually turn.

It's sorta like the rear bushes you put in, only there's a kind of ball shape inside the housing and it's then packed with compressed rubber. (there's a picture of one cut in half somewhere in this section of the forum)

So it shouldn't move like it's a bearing, at least until the suspension arms are playing against it, and even then it really shouldn't be turning inside much at all. (part of the reason why the suspension has to be laden before tightening the lower arms)
the front lower a-arm bushings are actually spherical bearings, with a lubricated hard plastic outer shell. they are NOT rubber bushings. they are very stiff when new and fresh, but once installed on the car with the lower arm, the leverage will allow you to turn them. the car does NOT need to be at ride height when installing these ! the upper arm, with its rubber bushing, of course wants to be at ride height before tightening the mounting bolt. unless you have replaced the upper bushing with a bushing from the lower a-arms !

beautiful rear bushing installers, BTW !! wish i had these years ago, when the shop crushed my trailing arms with their hydraulic press. . . :rolleyes:
 

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the front lower a-arm bushings are actually spherical bearings, with a lubricated hard plastic outer shell. they are NOT rubber bushings. they are very stiff when new and fresh, but once installed on the car with the lower arm, the leverage will allow you to turn them. the car does NOT need to be at ride height when installing these ! the upper arm, with its rubber bushing, of course wants to be at ride height before tightening the mounting bolt. unless you have replaced the upper bushing with a bushing from the lower a-arms !

beautiful rear bushing installers, BTW !! wish i had these years ago, when the shop crushed my trailing arms with their hydraulic press. . . :rolleyes:
I respectfully disagree with your statement, the 105 front suspension was originally designed and manufactured with the spherical bushing used for the upper bushing as well as the lower, at some point in the manufacturing run the upper was changed to rubber bushing. The manuals for servicing the front suspension specifically state the suspension should be tightened with the suspension fully loaded.
 

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Discussion Starter #20 (Edited)
OK, i took the liberty of cutting the lower wishbone bush, since i couldn't find it on the BB. Lower bush is definitely not rubber, but rather two plastic bits with groves to move the grease around and are separated by a plastic spacer in the middle.

Rich
 

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