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Discussion Starter #1
Alfisti,

I am about to send my '64 Giulia Spider out for body work and paint. I really want to strip off the decades-old, think ,black undercoating, but it requires removing the suspension. MY OCD nature is giving me fits, saying that this needs to be done, but this is going to be a driver and not a concours show car.

I have no idea how long the current suspension has been on the car (at least two-three POs ago , 15 + - years, at least).

I have come to trust the wisdom and appreciate the ponderous volume of points-of-view on the BB. So, think of me as your best friend and say, "Ray, you're 66; if I were you, I would...

As this is to be my only Spider, I really wanted it to be perfect, but. . .

Thanks,
 

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Removing undercoating

I just did that on my 58 Giulietta to get it ready for media blasting. It was quite a job w/o the car being on a rotisserie. I used a knotted wire wheel on my angle grinder after torching (very carefully) the black goo and scraping. Fortunately the garage was cold in November but you must use a respirator or keep all the doors open and fans going.
If you aren't getting it blasted or preparing areas for patching I'd leave it alone.
 

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I would like to share with you a few thoughts that might help you with your decision per stripping undercoat or not. My 60 Giulietta coupe spent most of it's years in California and had it's underside areas undercoated. The application was uneven and in some areas it was so thin that there was light surface rust. I didn't trust that the thicker areas were rust free under the coating since rocks thrown up can chip and crack the brittle tar like coating so I stripped it all off. This was A tedious process using a flat scraper at an angle to chip off the coat. With most of it off, the residue came off with paint thinner. A final cleanup was with lacquer thinner leaving bare paint. I then used a small air powered right angle disc grinder to remove the very thin coat of paint. After a final lacquer thinner clean up I used metal prep (weak phosphoric acid solution) to etch the metal and clean anything the thinner missed. The main point of all of this was to create a really good surface for epoxy primer to adher to followed by catalyzed automotive enamel. The result is a tough, water proof surface and if any rock chip trauma occurs it can be more easily detected and repaired compared to thick undercoating. One advantage of stripping the undercoat is that of weight saving. Yes, the suspension would need to be removed but that would make stripping and painting the suspension pieces easier. All of this work on my Sprint took over four months of laying under the car which was up on blocks and even using a spray gun. Having completed the work I am happy that I did it. On a car that is mostly rust free with a nice undercoated underside, one might want to leave well enough alone and just enjoy driving the car. I tend to not want to drive mine in the rain since the underside is so pristine but I hope to get over that. DC
 

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Hi Raimondo

Do it! You won't get another opportunity such as this to do it, so just do it.

Hard work, grime, grief, broken finger nails, well, maybe.

If you don`t you will always be concerned you didn`t; there is very little down side, except perhaps you may need help setting up the suspension for its best performance.

Richard
 

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I had my 101 Sprint Veloce walnut shell blasted completely using a rotisserie repair any body damage or rust. The car was garaged since new and still had rust in the rocker areas, door bottoms, a small section of the rear window and some areas in the front end of the chassis. The rusted out sections were replaced with steel sections. I removed a small section of undercoating manually, but quickly realized that it was too hard to remove and had the body shop blast the body.
 

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Alfisti,

I am about to send my '64 Giulia Spider out for body work and paint. I really want to strip off the decades-old, think ,black undercoating, but it requires removing the suspension. MY OCD nature is giving me fits, saying that this needs to be done, but this is going to be a driver and not a concours show car.

I have no idea how long the current suspension has been on the car (at least two-three POs ago , 15 + - years, at least).

I have come to trust the wisdom and appreciate the ponderous volume of points-of-view on the BB. So, think of me as your best friend and say, "Ray, you're 66; if I were you, I would...

As this is to be my only Spider, I really wanted it to be perfect, but. . .

Thanks,
Ray you are giving mixed signals.." Not concours but perfect" .. doesn't compute. If the undercoating is satisfactorily intact I would leave it alone and treat it like painting your house. When a house needs a paint job it is not necessary to take the WHOLE house down to bare wood. You chip away the loose paint, treat the bare areas and then finish coat.. If I were you I would scrape only the loose areas that are clearly loose or cracked, treat those areas with a rattle can shutz or 3M undercoating and finish the whole thing with a very light spray for uniformity. You shouldn't have to dismantle the whole supension to do it. I'm not a fan of these cars with spotless undersides as clean as the top sides with nothing but shiny paint. They were never delivered that way. I guess your decision will have to be yours. . Even if you do a rotisserie job, I think a black undercoating should go over everything anyway, so you are back to square one. I've judged at concours and really don't give too much credibility either way to undersides unless they are grossly neglected. My '57, I take pride in the fact it has the original undercoating.. It's whatever floats your canoe.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Uncle,

What happened to the BB?!
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Site Update

Jeff,

It is a great deal different, unless you've never seen it before.

When I joined the BB early last year, it was all new and different.
I did like the color contrast of the original version, and the Times New Roman font, it became familiar and comfortable.

The original and other long-term members mastered all the twists and turns of the site over the years, though, I have to admit there were some features that I could not figure out or make use of.

A previous responder said that he preferred the "Legacy" format, but I could not locate the "magic button" that could take us back to the way things were.

I expect that in a short amount of time we will all become accustomed to this new version and the conversations will return to "Alfaness" with volumes of Alfaese spoken as usual.

Maybe, we can just switch between the two versions from time to time when nostalgia overwhelms us. Hey, wait, isn't that what our cars are for?! I'm going to list my basket-case '64 Giulia Spider in the Garage section and chronicle its rectification to daily driver sweetness for all to enjoy with me.

It will take a while to adjust, but thanks for the hundreds of hours invested to help the BB remain one of the premier sites of its kind on the net.

Ray
 

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Jeff,

It is a great deal different, unless you've never seen it before.

When I joined the BB early last year, it was all new and different.
I did like the color contrast of the original version, and the Times New Roman font, it became familiar and comfortable.

The original and other long-term members mastered all the twists and turns of the site over the years, though, I have to admit there were some features that I could not figure out or make use of.

A previous responder said that he preferred the "Legacy" format, but I could not locate the "magic button" that could take us back to the way things were.

I expect that in a short amount of time we will all become accustomed to this new version and the conversations will return to "Alfaness" with volumes of Alfaese spoken as usual.

Maybe, we can just switch between the two versions from time to time when nostalgia overwhelms us. Hey, wait, isn't that what our cars are for?! I'm going to list my basket-case '64 Giulia Spider in the Garage section and chronicle its rectification to daily driver sweetness for all to enjoy with me.

It will take a while to adjust, but thanks for the hundreds of hours invested to help the BB remain one of the premier sites of its kind on the net.

Ray
Do you mind posting this in the feedback thread, I don;t want to thread Hi Jack.

http://www.alfabb.com/bb/forums/alfabb-autoguide-forum-support-help/385713-new-site-upgrade-look-feedback-thread-2.html#post6013145

Thanks,
Jeff
 

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Ray, you are 66 years old do you really want to scrape on the bottom of your car for 4 months? I have one 42 year old Alfa that had the bottom Dry Ice blasted before I got it and it looks like new. I would check around to see if anyone in your area is doing it or renting the equipment:
Mark
 

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Italian Lace

I thought I was golden with my 1965 Alfa Romeo Giulia Spider Veloce because it had been heavily undercoated. I decided to strip it down and found rusty lacework underneath I would not have found otherwise. I did a lot of the stripping by hand, using solvents, putty knives, and wire wheels in an angle grinder. Then it was sand blasted. Seems like some PO had used the undercoating as a cover up.

You only get to do this once, and this is the time to do it.
 

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