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Discussion Starter #1
Hi guys - thanks in advance for the help.

How would you coaching on the best way to remove a front and rear windshield intact on the GTs? Sharp knife on the rubber seals to heavily score/weaken them and then gently pop it out from the inside?

Other/better ideas?

Thanks!
 

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If they are glued in, use a wound guitar string. Poke it through at a convenient spot and have one person on each side "saw" along the perimeter. These windshields are really touchy and while I've never cracked one using this technique I have using a knife and cutting the glue away.

If it is gasketed, lie on your back and put your feet (socks, no shoes!) along the upper edge. Push with smooth, firm motion. It will resist initially but soon the seal will separate and the windshield will come loose. Have someone on the outside to catch it just to be safe. I wouldn't believe this until I saw my guys do it.

I don't think rear windshields are glued in but before I tried to remove either I would check that the PO didn't shoot some glue in.

Of course, try these at your own risk...
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks Rich. I know any random thing could of happened by now, but was there a cut over from glue to gasket?
 

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You can tell pretty readily by looking. Front, gasket was used in the US til 1969, glued came into use in 1971-74. Gasket has a visible rubber gasket and thin shiny trim, about half the width of the black rubber. Maybe 1/2" wide? Glued has no visible gasket and shiny trim is full width, nothing visible underneath beyond maybe so gooed-out glue. Maybe 1" wide? Pics of what you have will tell.

Rear, gasket used all years with thin shiny trim. The "crossed rope" method works going in or out on gaskets. If the gasket is old and will not be reused, just cut it from the inside with a good knife, little chance of breaking the glass. The lift the glass out.

Andrew


Andrew
 

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Agree with Jay. If the trim is in the rubber gasket, they come out together. Almost no way to get the trim out of the gasket, installed, without bending. On glued glass, the trim may come off OK if the glue isn't good. Otherwise cut the windshield out and remove the trim after it's off the car. No advantage to removing it on the car.

For my money, glued glass installation and removal is for a qualified glass shop unless you're parting a car, etc.

Andrew
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks guys, great info. Agree that paying a person to remove if it looks at all tricky is a good approach.
 

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Rich:

I assume you are referring to the trim on glue-in windshields. For gasketed F or R glass, the glass/gasket/trim should all come out (and go in) as a unit.
Umm... Duh! It never occurred to me that the trim would come out with the windshield. And yes, it's impossible not to bend the trim trying to pry it out...



Agree with Jay...
Always a good idea...


...For my money, glued glass installation and removal is for a qualified glass shop unless you're parting a car, etc.
Andrew
Always a good idea...

Lesson to be learned: Listen to Jay and Andrew and forget what I said...
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks guys - appreciate the tips. Looks like I need to cut the window gaskets out:

 

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I did this a few weeks ago on the front and rear of the 65.

Using a new 4" box cutter blade I cut the rubber gaskets top section face/lip off from the inside - run the blade to cut the gasket face off (parallel with the roof lining) and once the lip is trimmed off the top and top corners there should be very little resistance as it's the only thing holding it to the frame.

Did early cars in the US have glued in front screens?

I then used some glass suction cups to lift it out safely.
 

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Looks like I need to cut the window gaskets out:
I don't think you do. From your photos, I can see that your windshields are gasketed (which makes sense for a step nose GT). You can chose to follow Pancho's advice and cut the gasket. But that is kind of a tedious job, and if I tried it, I'd probably slice the headliner or my thumb. But if you do go that route, it would still help to have a second pair of hands - that rear glass is irreplacable.

I'd just hire a good glass professional, who will probably remove all your glass for < $100. These guys are typically mobile - they come to you.

pancho said:
Did early cars in the US have glued in front screens?
No, we didn't get glue-in until the early 1970's. Probably about the time the 2 liter engine was introduced.
 

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Unless your hamfisted, (not saying anyone here is) cutting the gasket at the top and top corners will leave the window in place without movement. Then lift out when your're ready to.

The headlining on tdskips car would need replacing for sure - so no fear! Ha!.

And yes, Jay is right, take your time - you'll find it difficult to get an early rear window - they didn't have demister wires. In fact you'll find it hard to find anything early GT, so keep everything and try buy original used/new bits as you find/afford them.
 

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windshield removal

just started this morn on my 66 sprint veloce, used 3n1 'penetrating oil to soften gasket, then used an exacto to cut at an ANGLE until reaching the thin centre of the trim' we then very' carefully u'sed 2 flathead screwdrivers to gently pry the trim out, completed half the front shield in 30min. trim came out PERFECT....so 2 guys , so slow, use oil, pry gently. first time doing this I have new gaskets, so once trim is cleaned we will carefully insert into new gasket ...lets see what happens
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Thanks, and good to hear it cooperated. Could you update us on how it goes back in and any lessons learned from reinstalling in?

Thanks
 

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yes Ill be pulling the shield and separating trim in the next 2 wks, Ill drop a line on the result, Im using alfabb know how on the windshield removal, and my tenant happens to be a retired 7alfa mechanic body guy from the 70s,80s. He came up with the plan on how to pull the trim, might be more stable taking the trim out with the windshield still in, Im not sure but this method could give you a better chance on not bending the trim. forgot to mention we removed the small metal clips 1st before using the exacto on both sides of the gasket, we took a fairly deep angle on the cut re less resistance on prying the trim, lets see the results in 2 wks.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Good luck to you, and let us know. Handy to have a tenant like that.
 

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just started this morn on my 66 sprint veloce, used 3n1 'penetrating oil to soften gasket, then used an exacto to cut at an ANGLE until reaching the thin centre of the trim' we then very' carefully u'sed 2 flathead screwdrivers to gently pry the trim out, completed half the front shield in 30min. trim came out PERFECT....
I'm not saying you can't do it that way, but I am puzzled why you'd do it that way.

If you remove the glass-gasket-trim as a unit (whether by cutting the gasket, or using your feet to pop out the glass, or using rope, or...), and then remove the gasket/trim from the glass, the trim will fall out of the gasket as you bend the gasket back away from it. That places very little stress on the trim, which is made from the softest aluminum imaginable - it is easy to bend, scratch, twist. Sure, you can bend it back into shape, but determining what shape to return it to is not so obvious.

Given that all three parts (glass, gasket, trim) are coming out anyways, I just don't see why you'd pry the trim out first. But hey, if it worked OK for you, great!
 
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