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I plan to replace all the old fuses in my "new" 84 GTV6 anx would also like to clean up the fuse holders as the brass has corroded.

Does anyone have any tips that have worked well? My finger and 600 grit didn't get into the tabs very well. I'm thinking maybe a dremel attachment possibly with a little polish?

Anybody got a good trick?

The interior lights in my Berlina stopped working because of corroded fuse box terminals.

Pic of my car out this morning on a dry day to appease the masses!

Cheers,
Ian


Sent from my GM1917 using Tapatalk
 

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Nice appeasement - thanks.

I use a toothbrush size brass bristle brush to clean the fuse contacts. A wire brush attachment in a Dremel type tool would work but probably best if it is variable speed and used on a slow speed to avoid overdoing it. I also like to apply a smear of dielectric grease to the clean contacts. Dielectric grease is funny stuff. It is non-conductive but it won't interfere with a properly snug electrical connection. I use it to stave off future corrosion.

Another thing to check is the connector blocks in the back of the fuse box. Remove & replace them one by one (so you don't mix up where they go). The act of R/R'ing them will clean off their connections to the fuse box. If you really want to ensure a full supply of electrons to the fused/switched circuits consider adding a relay so the contacts in the ignition switch don't have to carry the full load. See reply #3 & #12 here: Proud owner of an '82 GTV6

P.S. I prefer the fuses with a brass strip. The aluminum ones can somehow look OK but fail to allow electrons to flow. Aluminum oxides are aluminum colored so not always obvious. And I think the thin aluminum strip can develop micro cracks that prevent the free flow of electrons.
 

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When I restored my ‘66 Gtv I glass beaded the fuse box, didn’t do any harm to the plastic material and really cleaned up the brass tabs beautifully.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Nice appeasement - thanks.

I use a toothbrush size brass bristle brush to clean the fuse contacts. A wire brush attachment in a Dremel type tool would work but probably best if it is variable speed and used on a slow speed to avoid overdoing it. I also like to apply a smear of dielectric grease to the clean contacts. Dielectric grease is funny stuff. It is non-conductive but it won't interfere with a properly snug electrical connection. I use it to stave off future corrosion.

Another thing to check is the connector blocks in the back of the fuse box. Remove & replace them one by one (so you don't mix up where they go). The act of R/R'ing them will clean off their connections to the fuse box. If you really want to ensure a full supply of electrons to the fused/switched circuits consider adding a relay so the contacts in the ignition switch don't have to carry the full load. See reply #3 & #12 here: Proud owner of an '82 GTV6

P.S. I prefer the fuses with a brass strip. The aluminum ones can somehow look OK but fail to allow electrons to flow. Aluminum oxides are aluminum colored so not always obvious. And I think the thin aluminum strip can develop micro cracks that prevent the free flow of electrons.
Thanks, I actually did add a relay thanks to your writeup. It was kind of fun and because of that I noticed I had a few fuses that were too big, one was cracked and all the connections are corroded.

I will also try reseating all the connections on the back, that was something I had thought of doing as well.

I need to go back and see if my wipers are any faster with the relay.

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I used a cordless electric eraser.
 

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A pencil eraser. Seriously.
Yes, a pencil eraser works really well. The old school pencils with the red erasers have a bit of abrasive in them. They work well for cleaning electrical contacts. People of our generation know this.

I've used the small scotch brite buffers on my dremel to clean things up.

 

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Yes, a pencil eraser works really well. The old school pencils with the red erasers have a bit of abrasive in them. They work well for cleaning electrical contacts. People of our generation know this.

I've used the small scotch brite buffers on my dremel to clean things up.

I agree about the pencil eraser, and I edited my above post to reflect that. I learned about this trick long ago when reviving my BMW 2002tii---almost none of the exterior lights worked when I bought it, and simply cleaning the fuse contacts got most of the lights working!
 

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If you can find the old pen erasers, those are excellent. Or, sometimes putting a little lapping compound on the eraser can work on the stubborn ones.
 

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I plan to replace all the old fuses in my "new" 84 GTV6 anx would also like to clean up the fuse holders as the brass has corroded.

Does anyone have any tips that have worked well? My finger and 600 grit didn't get into the tabs very well. I'm thinking maybe a dremel attachment possibly with a little polish?

Anybody got a good trick?

The interior lights in my Berlina stopped working because of corroded fuse box terminals.

Pic of my car out this morning on a dry day to appease the masses!

Cheers,
Ian


Sent from my GM1917 using Tapatalk
deoxit also makes a product d100l which is not a spray which I used with a Q-tip and was effective. On the fuse panel an connectors an printed circuits like the tail lights
I plan to replace all the old fuses in my "new" 84 GTV6 anx would also like to clean up the fuse holders as the brass has corroded.

Does anyone have any tips that have worked well? My finger and 600 grit didn't get into the tabs very well. I'm thinking maybe a dremel attachment possibly with a little polish?

Anybody got a good trick?

The interior lights in my Berlina stopped working because of corroded fuse box terminals.

Pic of my car out this morning on a dry day to appease the masses!

Cheers,
Ian


Sent from my GM1917 using Tapatalk
I plan to replace all the old fuses in my "new" 84 GTV6 anx would also like to clean up the fuse holders as the brass has corroded.

Does anyone have any tips that have worked well? My finger and 600 grit didn't get into the tabs very well. I'm thinking maybe a dremel attachment possibly with a little polish?

Anybody got a good trick?

The interior lights in my Berlina stopped working because of corroded fuse box terminals.

Pic of my car out this morning on a dry day to appease the masses!

Cheers,
Ian


Sent from my GM1917 using Tapatalk
 

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I plan to replace all the old fuses in my "new" 84 GTV6 anx would also like to clean up the fuse holders as the brass has corroded.

Does anyone have any tips that have worked well? My finger and 600 grit didn't get into the tabs very well. I'm thinking maybe a dremel attachment possibly with a little polish?

Anybody got a good trick?

The interior lights in my Berlina stopped working because of corroded fuse box terminals.

Pic of my car out this morning on a dry day to appease the masses!

Cheers,
Ian


Sent from my GM1917 using Tapatalk
I used an ink pencil tip eraser- they are usually the white rubber end, with a high level of success and changed them all the glass fuses.
 

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I have an ‘86 GTV6. I replaced all the fuses and used DeoxIt! on all the electrical contact points. The version I have is red liquid in a little glass bottle with a brush in the cap. I have also used it on all the taillight sockets/contacts. The issue with erasers and fine sandpaper is the metal reoxidizes quickly. Dabbing on the DeoxIt! is easy and, more importantly, effective over the long term. The stuff ain’t exactly cheap but I’ve found it to be indispensable. After I bought it I found more uses for it than I had previously considered. Pretty sure you can buy it on Amazon.
 

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Yep, several different packaging options available on Amazon.
 
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