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The Tipo 163, was conceived by the team of Alfa Romeo headed at that time by W.P. Ricart in 1941, around the Tipo 162 GP engine.

The 135º V16 3 litre, centrally placed behind the driver, gave some 190 [email protected] 7450 rpm. devoid of the two blowers.

Independent front suspension and a modified De Dion layout supported the rear transaxle with a five forward speed gearbox. Chassis was tubular.

With a WB of 255 cm and a track of 132, the three-seater had an streamlined body and was a clean forerunner of the late sixties sport- prototypes designs.

Sadly, WW II ended T-162 (GP car) and T-163 (street car) projects.

Drawings exist. and certainly some parts were made, but no one seems certain if a 162 or 163 was ever completed. I don't believe so. 1/43rd scale miniatures exist of the 163..
 

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Dretceterini efficiently summed up the key points of that car.

I can add that the drawing was done by Rens Biesma for Het Klaverblaadje. There are no picture of the real thing as it was never fully completed, albeit my understanding is that it lacked little.

The car actually survived WWII only to be scrapped as late as 1953. :mad: :( :rolleyes:

There are instead a few factory drawings showing both the body rendering and the layout. They can be found, a.o. in Fusi.
 

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Dretceterini efficiently summed up the key points of that car.

I can add that the drawing was done by Rens Biesma for Het Klaverblaadje. There are no picture of the real thing as it was never fully completed, albeit my understanding is that it lacked little.

The car actually survived WWII only to be scrapped as late as 1953. :mad: :( :rolleyes:

There are instead a few factory drawings showing both the body rendering and the layout. They can be found, a.o. in Fusi.

Is Rens still active? He doesn't respond to posts I have sent to the mail address I have for him (in Malta), nor to e-mails to the address on his website...
 

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Does anyone have any info on these car?
The 163 is one of my favorite cars, and I was delighted to find an article by AR archivist Elvira Ruocco in an October 2001 issue of La Manovella. Let me blow off some smoke dust:

The car is basically as Stu described, though a two-seater, with fat sill fuel tanks. The car was built on a floppy ladder frame, and had the curious rear-pivot Ricart pattern de Dion... but it was an amazing car, a ghost predating our modern "Supercars" [as the 2.9 did in fact, of course].

The article includes a sheet from the archives detailing a sealed rear suspension unit, complete with full parts identification. That drawing is dated 24.6.42. The article seems to state that sets of mechanical components were built in April 1943. Ruocco writes that Canestrini mentions the car in an article in March 1946... and Lurani himself talks about the car being in that lower-level basement in Auto Italiana 15.2.50. I'd like to think the car survived, at least for a while.

The issue includes illustrations by Rens Biesma which were originally published in the HK #29 on the 163. Ben's Dutch is too thick for me but the HK article mostly includes the same archive information used in Fusi's book, with maybe more technical specifications than Fusi but less history than Ruocco's article.

--Carter
 

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The 163 is one of my favorite cars, and I was delighted to find an article by AR archivist Elvira Ruocco in an October 2001 issue of La Manovella. Let me blow off some smoke dust:

The car is basically as Stu described, though a two-seater, with fat sill fuel tanks. The car was built on a floppy ladder frame, and had the curious rear-pivot Ricart pattern de Dion... but it was an amazing car, a ghost predating our modern "Supercars" [as the 2.9 did in fact, of course].

The article includes a sheet from the archives detailing a sealed rear suspension unit, complete with full parts identification. That drawing is dated 24.6.42. The article seems to state that sets of mechanical components were built in April 1943. Ruocco writes that Canestrini mentions the car in an article in March 1946... and Lurani himself talks about the car being in that lower-level basement in Auto Italiana 15.2.50. I'd like to think the car survived, at least for a while.

The issue includes illustrations by Rens Biesma which were originally published in the HK #29 on the 163. Ben's Dutch is too thick for me but the HK article mostly includes the same archive information used in Fusi's book, with maybe more technical specifications than Fusi but less history than Ruocco's article.

--Carter
Interesting, because I remember seeing drawing showing it as a 3 seater, with the middle seat slightly behind 2 front ones.....or am I thinking of the slightly earlier period Auto Union design for a street car based on the D-type GP car....

The first time I was in the "basement" was circa 1968, and the 163 wasn't there, so I assume it became scrap or was used in the creation/restoration of cars in the museum.
 

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As we are talking about the Tipo 163, please let me hint to a little detail that was already a point of discussion between Luigi Fusi and Ben Hendricks (the author of the article about the 163 in Klaverbladje #29).



When you look closely at the drawing, you see something that looks like a little wing underneath the car at the rear end.

Here it is obvious:


Was the wing really an aerodynamic device, created to achieve something like a ground-effect, although I think that the weight of the engine must have been sufficient to glue the rear on the road efficiently?
If the intention was indeed aerodynamical, Ricart was again a long period ahead of his time.

Further, I ask myself if the same feature could have been efficient on the Disco Volantes in order to avoid the rear-end lifting in fast corners:confused:

Best regards
Ciao Carlo:cool:
 

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When you look closely at the drawing, you see something that looks like a little wing underneath the car at the rear end.

Further, I ask myself if the same feature could have been efficient on the Disco Volantes in order to avoid the rear-end lifting in fast corners
I think it is just the end of the tailpipe continued rearward from the engine and interrupted in the drawing as it passes under the rear wheel.

The aerodynamic problems on the wonderful Disco Volante were more general: it lifted everywhere, and in every direction :)

--Carter
 

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The first time I was in the "basement" was circa 1968, and the 163 wasn't there, so I assume it became scrap or was used in the creation/restoration of cars in the museum.
Believe me when I write: the 163 was scrapped in 1953, 15 years before you visited the basement... Don't ask me how nor why exactly, I don't know.

Carlo: I think Carter is right: a close look makes the "wing" a more probable exhaust pipe indeed.
 

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Believe me when I write: the 163 was scrapped in 1953, 15 years before you visited the basement... Don't ask me how nor why exactly, I don't know.

Carlo: I think Carter is right: a close look makes the "wing" a more probable exhaust pipe indeed.
So it was gone before Fusi even started to think about a museum....sad....
 

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Carter, I have to agree! Indeed a tailpipe!
The drawings don't lie, but they sometimes give room for different interpretations;)
I just recalled Ben Hendicks taking a wing construction as possibility...

I don't want to open a new Disco Volante thread, but you see on the attached photo what I meant in my previous post.

 

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I'm going to blow a thick layer of dust off of this topic. As I intent to build the Autostile 1/43 scale model of this car, I've started to look closely at (pictures of) the original drawings of it and to compare them with the scale model and the later drawings by Rens. And I'm really wondering about all the glass on the car. What strikes me is the fact that the windscreen is split in four parts, basically to be able to use flat pieces of glass for it. Compare this to the complicated curves of the glass on (especially) the top of the car, over the driver's head. Was this even possible back in 1940? Even if it was, it doesn't seem to make much sense combined with the way thew windscreen was designed.

Aren't the "windows" over the engine actually meant to be something like a (metal) hood, split in two on each side to enable them to be hinged in the middle, like they usually did back then when the engine was in the front? And why would they have wanted a glass roof on the car? Was it going to race airplanes? How would a glass roof make it faster? Couldn't steel be much thinner and thus much lighter? Sure, on the drawings you see some outlines looking like windows, but then there's also outlines for the bumps on the front of the car and over the wheels and for various removable parts. Those are not windows either.

Does anybody know if there's any further info about this car apart from that in the Fusi bible, that might have some answers here?
 

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I think about 2 years ago Elvira Ruocco did a review of this car for Cozzi museum. You can find it online in Italian. The most complete article about the car was written by Elvira Ruocco as well, for Italian La Manovella magazine.
This car has never been real, drawings just represent the initial idea

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Alfa Romeo and Italian coachbuilders in the end of 30s used a Plexiglas for racing cars, it was flexible, light and durable material.
For instance windows (except a windshield) of 8c 2900B LeMans made from Plexiglas

I'll ask Rens Biesma, he might know the answer
 

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Thanks for pointing out the Cozzi museum review by Elvira Ruocco. Very interesting indeed, but unfortunately nothing on the coach, let alone the windows. I couldn't find the article from La Manovella online, so I guess I'll buy the issue somewhere.

The funny thing is that the 8C 2900 Le Mans car was in my mind as a reference. State-of-the-art car designed only three years earlier. I never knew it had Plexiglas windows (didn't even know it already existed then), however, every window on the car is dead flat...

Thanks in advance for asking Rens Biesma. I'm very curious about what he might have to say about it.
 

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I think I have a copy of the article, will check at home. I'll post it here if I have
It is mostly about the drawings that were found in the Alfa Romeo Archive. And about a car history during the Second World War and after.

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