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Discussion Starter #1
Hello everyone,

I thought it would be fun to tell about my latest 164 adventure and see how others would react under a similar situation. Here is what happened. I took my automatic 1994 LS to the full service car wash on Saturday afternoon for a much needed cleaning. I dropped it off at the front of the line, gave my instructions to the attendant, and then went inside along with my 8-year-old son to wait. After about 15 minutes, my car shows up on the other side of the building. It had gone through the bath, was being dried off, and was waiting for the interior clean up.

The attendant waved me over and explained that the car would not shut off. This had never happened before and tried to shut it off. I was actually able to remove the key completely but the engine kept on running very smoothly using the hidden key safety switch underneath the ignition switch. It was not trying to "diesel" or anything like that. Also, the temperature gauge was in the 200-degree range! Air bubbles were coming out of the radiator into the expansion tank and steam was coming out of the tank overflow hose. The car is still running, starting to overheat and there is no immediate way to shut it off! I got in the car and moved it away from the other cars at the wash just in case it overheated to the point of exploding and I did not want to endanger other cars.

Now, the question to everyone is: what would you do to stop the car from running in order to prevent it from overheating? Do you know how to shut off your car fairly quickly if you had to? Think it over and post your answers and I will tell everyone what I ended up trying and what eventually worked.

Also, I think a new ignition switch is definitely in my future.

Thanks,

Jeff
Dallas, Texas
 

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Couple options come to mind. Without tools on 24v model I probably would open hood and try to disconnect rpm timing sensor wiring connector near thermostat or coolant temp sensor in same area.

Disconnecting Air Flow meter connector probably wouldn't kill engine at idle.

With tools I would maybe remove black cover over motronic and fuel pump relays and pull relays and/or on 24v pull fuel pump and motronic fuses.

On 12v drop fuse panel cover and pull engine services fuse.

Another option would be drop fuse panel cover and disconnect igntion switch wiring connector.

What is this hidden switch of yours a temporary repair due to bad ignition switch?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
There is a small oval shaped cover underneath the steering column that contains a small pin type mechanism. You pull the pin down and it releases the key so it can be removed. It was put there in case the battery died and you needed to remove the key.

Thanks,

Jeff
Dallas, Texas
 

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Quickly disconnect the large (2.5 inch diameter) connector on the driver's side of the engine that brings both injector pulse and spark signal to the engine. Takes less than 5 seconds.

Now, of course I had a minute to ponder that. I would have probably panicked first and done something completely different (or stupid).

;)
 

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What would I do?

I guess I would pop the hood open and disconnect the big round multipin connector on the right side of the engine. An alternative would be to cover the air intake with my hands and choke it till submission----
 

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Great minds think alike?

Jason I started to answer the question and then left my desk to go get some coffee-- finished it and posted it-- then your post showed up--- I guess I was late on the send trigger but absolutely needed my coffee (fresh ground Peets!)
 

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Without tools? Just pull the crank angle sensor - the connector clipped right there by the little black plastic cover right behind the passenger-side head-light!

My 2nd thought would have been to pull the large round harness connector behind the motor!

What did you do?
 

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Something that would work but NOT be a good idea, yanking the coil wire. :eek:
Charles
 

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There's no coil wire to yank on a 1994 or 1995 Alfa 164!!!
 

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Hello everyone,

I thought it would be fun to tell about my latest 164 adventure and see how others would react under a similar situation. Here is what happened. I took my automatic 1994 LS to the full service car wash on Saturday afternoon for a much needed cleaning. I dropped it off at the front of the line, gave my instructions to the attendant, and then went inside along with my 8-year-old son to wait. After about 15 minutes, my car shows up on the other side of the building. It had gone through the bath, was being dried off, and was waiting for the interior clean up.

The attendant waved me over and explained that the car would not shut off. This had never happened before and tried to shut it off. I was actually able to remove the key completely but the engine kept on running very smoothly using the hidden key safety switch underneath the ignition switch. It was not trying to "diesel" or anything like that. Also, the temperature gauge was in the 200-degree range! Air bubbles were coming out of the radiator into the expansion tank and steam was coming out of the tank overflow hose. The car is still running, starting to overheat and there is no immediate way to shut it off! I got in the car and moved it away from the other cars at the wash just in case it overheated to the point of exploding and I did not want to endanger other cars.

Now, the question to everyone is: what would you do to stop the car from running in order to prevent it from overheating? Do you know how to shut off your car fairly quickly if you had to? Think it over and post your answers and I will tell everyone what I ended up trying and what eventually worked.

Also, I think a new ignition switch is definitely in my future.

Thanks,

Jeff
Dallas, Texas
I don't know, I'd probably put it in gear, step on the brakes, and let up on the clutch. Good question!

bs
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Steve wrote: "What is this hidden switch of yours a temporary repair due to bad ignition switch?"

The electronic solenoid that is suppose to release the key when the red button is pushed has been intermittent for the last 6 or so months and has stopped working completely for the last 3 or so weeks. I think my inattention to this electrical component may have contributed to the eventual failure of the ignition switch. Also, I only keep seven keys on my key chain, with no attachments other than my Exxon speed pass so it is not likely that the weight of my keys was putting undue stress on the ignition switch.

Now, what is more mystifying is why the car decided to overheat while the ignition switch was malfunctioning. I can say with conviction that the radiator fan was not cycling on when it should have. Are the two malfunctions even related?

I will post what I did tomorrow in order to maintain the level of suspense. The answers so far have been great but do not yet represent everything I tired so keep the guesses coming. If I were smart, I would put some type of poll of possible answers together, but that part is over my head.

Thanks everyone, I am actually learning more about the car from this.

Jeff

:cool:
 

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Now, what is more mystifying is why the car decided to overheat while the ignition switch was malfunctioning. I can say with conviction that the radiator fan was not cycling on when it should have. Are the two malfunctions even related? :
Igntion switch pink wire runs accessories like cooling fan power and brown wire runs motronic and ignition. These are on different contacts in switch. Maybe had you left key on fan would have run/ran.

Maybe you should wash your own car?
 

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According to ****** (famous racer and cam-guy extraordinaire), you can just pull the negative battery terminal off and it would die instantly...! :rolleyes: :D
 

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Unplug the fuel pump in the trunk came to mind first. Choke out the intake as suggested by Goats.

I would never leave the ignition off just in case it had to power the fan while I had to figure out what to do to kill it.

If I unplugged the Motronic temp sensor the car would die right?
 

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I think the important thing to discuss here is how would you do it under duress (panic mode) and without any tools handy.

My friend burned his Lancia Zagato seriously when a fuel injector hose ruptured with it in his garage in winter time. Luckily he was able to push it outside before right front tire blew from heat as he screamed call 911. It was so cold his garden hose was frozen, too. In his case all he would have had to do was turn off key to stop fuel flow because he had a faulty switch in air flow meter and fuel pump kept feeding the fire. Good reason to be sure fuel pump won't run until engine put into starter mode or running.

In Jeff's case maybe leaving key on was the answer and then disconnecting large round wiring connector for injectors and coil packs at engine as already suggested above. Other suggestions of disconnecting RPM/timing sensor wire and coolant temp sensor connectors if they have quick disconnect springs which most 12v models don't have is another option.
 
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