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Discussion Starter #1
So I recently had some start up issues and had to replace the thermo tempurature ignition switch around the thermostat housing area. Once I finally got the car started and the fan kicked on, I went to open the bleeder screw only to discover that there was no water coming out of the thermostat housing/screw. I took the bleeder screw completely off and no water came out. So does this mean I have a stuck thermostat or a bunch of gunk clogging up the thermostat housing?
 

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I really hope it doesn't mean that you have no coolant in there :eek: Did you check for coolant on the system? :eek:
Jes
 

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You do the initial fill by opening the bleed screw, then filling at the reservoir until coolant comes out the bleed screw hole. Did you try this?
 

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Discussion Starter #6
No. So you take the bleed screw completely off, then fill coolant into the bleed screw hole?
 

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But Mad North-Northwest
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No - loosen the bleed screw, then fill at the RESERVOIR. It should start coming out the bleed screw before the reservoir fills. Then tighten the bleed screw and finish filling the reservoir.

Then you run the engine to hot and bleed at the screw until air stops coming out. The full procedure is in the Cardisc.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I already tried that but to no avail, no coolant is coming out. I think it's the thermostat but, I would also like to flush the radiator out. Do you know where the drain plug is on the radiator??? Picture???

GEO
 

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Well, there is SORT of a radiator drain plug: the fan switch, which is a big brass plug at the lower right-hand corner of the radiator.

Takes a 29mm socket, I seem to recall... which means that from a practical perspective, taking off the lower hose may be the easiest route if your biggest socket is a 19mm. :)

My favorite coolant-draining bit on any car: my 1967 Giulia Sprint GT 1300 Junior, which had a little bronze faucet ON THE SIDE OF THE BLOCK. Made it soooo easy to drain the engine as well as the radiator.
 

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You do the initial fill by opening the bleed screw, then filling at the reservoir until coolant comes out the bleed screw hole. Did you try this?
That's how it works on the Spider, I haven't seen it come out of the bleed screw when filling the Milano. I fill it to the max on the overflow then start the car and squeeze the upper hose a bit until I can feel it flowing through (don't forget to put the heater on hot). Once it warms up a bit then I bleed it with the bleed screw.

Kevin
 

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Discussion Starter #13
So I went to take off the thermostat housing and two of the three bolts stapped. The next step was to use an easy out to drill out and remove the broken bolts on the bottom part of the housing. While I was doing this and let my guard down by removing my rag from the housing, I droppen my 4mm socket down into the housing. Holly #!^* What I am to do next? Does anyone know if I have to rip the entire component off or will a magnet reach? Since I disconnected the hose to thermostat both top and bottom, I know it reached the engine side. What next???
 

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But Mad North-Northwest
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Gaaahhh...

Can you see it? If memory of the layout serves, if you dropped it straight down it should be sitting in the water pump. Perhaps you can reach it with a magnetic retrieval tool.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I am going to give the magnet tool a try but, I can't see it. I feel worse about this than I do about the snapped bolts. I'll let you know. How long of a reach do you think I need to make?

GEO
 

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There is not a lot of strength in those bolts or the bolts that mount the water pump. I snapped 1 removing my water pump. The bolt was actually seized in the clearance diameter in the waterpump, not the threaded portion in the block. Once I removed the water pump the remaining stub was easily removed.

So aluminum has a coefficient of thermal expansion almost twice that of steel. The bottom line- heat- if your careful it is almost always a good idea for removing corroded fasteners. A good penetrating oil is always a good idea as well. I used to use liquid wrench but I am liking PB blaster lately.

Even with all that I had to invest in a set of helicoils when I stripped the threads from the valve cover bolt holes. Oops.

Its not that difficult to remove the water pump, when was the last time the tensioner and timing belt was done? Boy how these projects can mushroom!
 

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But Mad North-Northwest
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It's probably more of an issue of where in the pump it is - that is, can you reach it around the vanes? Worst case I suppose you can pull the water pump. Here's a diagram of the area if it helps.
 

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