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In aviation, it is spelled out in the Federal Aviation Regulations (FARs) that the pilot in command is ultimately responsible for the condition of the aircraft and of anything that happens to it.
My dad spent years as a CAB the FAA aviation accident and incident investigator. Conservatively speaking, 90% of the accidents/incidents the pilot in command was found to be at fault. And no it is not a case of being easier to blame the dead guy, these investigations are very thorough with manufacturers and often outside experts in various fields included.
Although the FARs apply only to aviation (there is a marine version also from which FARs are derived) I believe this principle applies to life in general.
We live in a society that wants to blame anyone but ourselves.
 

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In aviation, it is spelled out in the Federal Aviation Regulations (FARs) that the pilot in command is ultimately responsible for the condition of the aircraft and of anything that happens to it.
My dad spent years as a CAB the FAA aviation accident and incident investigator. Conservatively speaking, 90% of the accidents/incidents the pilot in command was found to be at fault. And no it is not a case of being easier to blame the dead guy, these investigations are very thorough with manufacturers and often outside experts in various fields included.
Although the FARs apply only to aviation (there is a marine version also from which FARs are derived) I believe this principle applies to life in general.
We live in a society that wants to blame anyone but ourselves.
While neither deserved to die in this accident. In my opinion and from what the accident investigators have concluded, it was totally driver error. Sorry as it may be.
 

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"Honestly, I don't really care why the accident happened. At this point, it really doesn't matter. "
Probably not the best quote to use......
When she said it, 4 people needlessly died.
 

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Strangely enough....my 1750GTV has a emotional connection to Paul Walker and hauntingly to this story. Years ago while I was working on a film with Paul, he and I went for little spirited drive in my GTV when we were on lunch break. I had just taken ownership of my car and hadn't really driven it much...it had the original tyres from the previous owner and were in need of replacing. Its the first thing he said to me...."man get new tyres on this thing...it's really important". When I heard of his death, I was immediately transported back to that day when we had a little fun together in my Alfa and over the course of the film got to know each other a little and talk cars. He helped get my carbs set up properly one day as they were popping and spitting and realised that there were cracks in the rubber mounts. Paul was top man, and he was very level headed. I think if he was behind the wheel that day they would both be alive, as I don't think he would have pushed things as far. He cared too much for his family to take stupid risks.

RIP mate...there's aways a part of you on every drive.
 

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Discussion Starter #27
When I get behind the wheel of my car, I take responsibility.

If something goes wrong - a mechanical failure, health or medical failure, failure of judgement, anything that happens - I must take responsibility. There is nobody else in control of the situation. Failure to take responsibility puts our hobby - our interest in classic, sports or racing cars - in serious jeopardy. Is there a good reason you don't see this?

It is not fair to judge as indecent, or worse, those who recognize the importance of this. Shame on you.
I agree!

One of my favorite misnomers is "a dangerous road".

I have parked, and briefly walked on such roads and come away unscathed.

I believe no road is inherently "dangerous".

What is dangerous is how a driver uses that road.
 
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