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Enjoy your Veterans' Day, regardless of where you are, where you served, or if you served. If you didn't, I hope you will take a moment to show your appreciation to those of us who did.
We are better off for it, and I KNOW you are.
 

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Enjoy your Veterans' Day, regardless of where you are, where you served, or if you served. If you didn't, I hope you will take a moment to show your appreciation to those of us who did.
We are better off for it, and I KNOW you are.


To all Veterans, past and present and
 

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Veterens

Enjoy your Veterans' Day, regardless of where you are, where you served, or if you served. If you didn't, I hope you will take a moment to show your appreciation to those of us who did.
We are better off for it, and I KNOW you are.
Amen to that.
 

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Indeed.

For decades the natural governing party-The Liberals- were not just indifferent to the military, but hostile to all things about defence.

Fortunately, the new government understands that defense is not just another gun-control issue. Also the Chief of the Defence Staff is a real warrior-General Rick Hillier.

He and some other top brass were part of the opening of a hockey game in February. A navy band was there - lot's of flags - and I discovered that hockey fans are also fans of the military.

We had very good seats, and as it turned out when the ceremony was over 4 of the military leaders were sitting across the isle.

At the first interval I introduced myself to General Hillier and complemented him on providing such outstanding leadership.

We chatted briefly and then I said that I regreted that I was too young to have served in World War II and now too old to serve in Afghanistan.

Immediately, he looked me in the eye and said "For you we will make a special exception".

Outstanding.
 

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At the first interval I introduced myself to General Hillier and complemented him on providing such outstanding leadership.

We chatted briefly and then I said that I regreted that I was too young to have served in World War II and now too old to serve in Afghanistan.

Immediately, he looked me in the eye and said "For you we will make a special exception".

Outstanding.
Amazing!

I hope everyone had a happy Veterans Day and I am thankful for those that have served for this great country. They are the most honorable.
 

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For decades the natural governing party-The Liberals- were not just indifferent to the military, but hostile to all things about defence...We chatted briefly and then I said that I regreted that I was too young to have served in World War II and now too old to serve in Afghanistan...Immediately, he looked me in the eye and said "For you we will make a special exception".
1. As a 20 year veteran of service as an officer in the Canadian Navy, most of that time within the framework of a liberal government, I must disagree with your remarks about the government's support for the military. In a Canadian context, the government was to a large extent, very supportive, knowledgeable and helpful...though not always. They certainly were not perfect, but your remarks are certainly untrue.

2. I have met General Hillier and know many who know him well. He is a good General, but like most of them, he's just another politician.

3. Perhaps you missed out on WWII, but where were you when Canada was involved in Israel, Cyprus, Haiti, The Golan Heights, Rwanda, Cambodia (I was there)...etc? There was lots to do to support your country and help the world in between WWII and Afghanistan. Are you really too old? Check the recruiting website to find out.

4. On Veteran's day (Rememberance Day in Canada), I took a moment of silence at 11 AM to remember my fallen comrades and all those who made the ultimate sacrifice.
 

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Alex

I appreciate your service, but can't agree that decades of Liberal government was even benign for our military.

When I was 20 I applied for pilot qualification and did not make it. For me then my career was as a pilot or not at all.

Part of my note was to acknowledge our civilian debt to all who serve.

The partisan attack by the Liberals started with Paul Hellier's messaniac mission to get the army, air force and navy into one uniform. Our Navy had the fortitude to resist the travesty. During the Liberal neglect Canada's position deteriorated from having force as well as a voice in international affairs to merely having a voice.

My regard for the outlook on our military has not been limited to what I read. An uncle served through WWll and retired as head of Air Material Command Headquarters. A nephew serves now as a captain in the army and his view is that Hillier as well as the change in government is a "night and day" change. He also says that his buddies share his view.

Another point in posting the note was to share a new found pride in our capability and to record what some might think of as a example of a very quick wit.

Bob
 

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I lost my long-time companion "Dirty Harry" the dachshund yesterday. He was 17 years old. In any event, please forgive me for being somewhat harsh in my tone in my previous post. This thread is about honoring vets, and I will try and bring it back around to that point.

Bob - You are certainly entitled to your opinions, but perhaps another, more appropriate forum would be a better place to denounce the Liberals. Here, in this thread, as Sean correctly (but quite impolitely) pointed out, we should not stray from the topic of honoring those who served.

Stu - Please stop. Find somewhere else to play.

Sean and others - I apologize.

Gordy and all other Vets - Lest We Forget

In Flanders Fields
By: Lieutenant Colonel John McCrae, MD (1872-1918)
Canadian Army


In Flanders Fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the Dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved and were loved, and now we lie
In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe:
To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders fields. Lest we forget
 

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Originally Posted by Nicola
Enjoy your Veterans' Day, regardless of where you are, where you served, or if you served. If you didn't, I hope you will take a moment to show your appreciation to those of us who did.
We are better off for it, and I KNOW you are.

Well said, Gordy.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
In Flanders Fields
By: Lieutenant Colonel John McCrae, MD (1872-1918)
Canadian Army


In Flanders Fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the Dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved and were loved, and now we lie
In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe:
To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders fields. Lest we forget
Thanks Alex for reminding me of this poem. The most emotional recall I have of it was reading it on a (Ten Years' After :confused:) album in 1970 or 1971 in Phu Bai, RVN.
I'm sorry that my attempt at recognition for so many went awry.

All gave some.
Some gave all.

Peace Out
 

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Thanks Alex for reminding me of this poem. The most emotional recall I have of it was reading it on a (Ten Years' After :confused:) album in 1970 or 1971 in Phu Bai, RVN.
I'm sorry that my attempt at recognition for so many went awry.

All gave some.
Some gave all.

Peace Out
Fine sentiments. And no apology necessary; it didn't "go" awry--that it was highjacked diminishes nothing.
 

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The most emotional recall I have of it was reading it on a (Ten Years' After :confused:) album in 1970 or 1971 in Phu Bai, RVN.
I'm sorry that my attempt at recognition for so many went awry.
Gordy,

Thanks for sharing that memory. That must have been a very emotional moment.

Here's more info about the poem. It is the reason why the poppy is the symbol of Remembrance Day around the world.

McCrae's "In Flanders Fields" remains to this day one of the most memorable war poems ever written. It is a lasting legacy of the terrible battle in the Ypres salient in the spring of 1915. Here is the story of the making of that poem:

Although he had been a doctor for years and had served in the South African War, it was impossible to get used to the suffering, the screams, and the blood here, and Major John McCrae had seen and heard enough in his dressing station to last him a lifetime.

As a surgeon attached to the 1st Field Artillery Brigade, Major McCrae, who had joined the McGill faculty in 1900 after graduating from the University of Toronto, had spent seventeen days treating injured men -- Canadians, British, Indians, French, and Germans -- in the Ypres salient.

It had been an ordeal that he had hardly thought possible. McCrae later wrote of it:

"I wish I could embody on paper some of the varied sensations of that seventeen days... Seventeen days of Hades! At the end of the first day if anyone had told us we had to spend seventeen days there, we would have folded our hands and said it could not have been done."

One death particularly affected McCrae. A young friend and former student, Lieut. Alexis Helmer of Ottawa, had been killed by a shell burst on 2 May 1915. Lieutenant Helmer was buried later that day in the little cemetery outside McCrae's dressing station, and McCrae had performed the funeral ceremony in the absence of the chaplain.

The next day, sitting on the back of an ambulance parked near the dressing station beside the Canal de l'Yser, just a few hundred yards north of Ypres, McCrae vented his anguish by composing a poem. The major was no stranger to writing, having authored several medical texts besides dabbling in poetry.

In the nearby cemetery, McCrae could see the wild poppies that sprang up in the ditches in that part of Europe, and he spent twenty minutes of precious rest time scribbling fifteen lines of verse in a notebook.

A young soldier watched him write it. Cyril Allinson, a twenty-two year old sergeant-major, was delivering mail that day when he spotted McCrae. The major looked up as Allinson approached, then went on writing while the sergeant-major stood there quietly. "His face was very tired but calm as we wrote," Allinson recalled. "He looked around from time to time, his eyes straying to Helmer's grave."

When McCrae finished five minutes later, he took his mail from Allinson and, without saying a word, handed his pad to the young NCO. Allinson was moved by what he read:

"The poem was exactly an exact description of the scene in front of us both. He used the word blow in that line because the poppies actually were being blown that morning by a gentle east wind. It never occurred to me at that time that it would ever be published. It seemed to me just an exact description of the scene."

In fact, it was very nearly not published. Dissatisfied with it, McCrae tossed the poem away, but a fellow officer retrieved it and sent it to newspapers in England. The Spectator, in London, rejected it, but Punch published it on 8 December 1915.
 

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Thanks for the great thread, Nicola, and for your thoughts, Alex- as a twenty year Navy Veteran, I felt honored to have served and have no regrets about my service. My son is currently serving in the USAF in Kirkuk, Iraq. I am very proud of him, and he knows why he is there and the ramifications if we weren't there. We will vote for the best course for the future with ballots, not bullets- I am very thankful that we can have the freedom to express our views, but I am saddened by the violent vitriol coming from the left and right these days- it doesn't help bring us together, or find common ground. Hate is not the answer, let's just honor our Vets and let our politicians know our will by exercising our rights and voting our conscience, and then supporting our elected officials. I for one would like to see politics banned from this board- let's just talk Alfa's and other related subjects, with an occasional excursion off topic where appropriate! There's plenty of Right Wing and Left Wing blogs with receptive audiences for all views, so that's my 2 cents worth.;)
 

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Speech

Hold on, in a way, this debate is relevant to Veterans’ Day when you think about it. The terrible sacrifices our military have made -- and are making -- are in aide of protecting and promoting our cherished national beliefs, liberty and freedom, freedom of speech included. And those great sacrifices seek to protect all speech, contemptible and facile speech as much any other kind. So go ahead Stu, enjoy your freedom. But please be thankful.
 

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Hold on, in a way, this debate is relevant to Veterans’ Day when you think about it. The terrible sacrifices our military have made -- and are making -- are in aide of protecting and promoting our cherished national beliefs, liberty and freedom, freedom of speech included. And those great sacrifices seek to protect all speech, contemptible and facile speech as much any other kind. So go ahead Stu, enjoy your freedom. But please be thankful.
No question about this, and I certainly prefer as few limits on free speech as possible. But there are some limits. No one fought and died for this country so that Stu could incite violence against a sitting president. And, as others have pointed out, whatever one's political beliefs, there are some times when it's more appropriate to simply express gratitude than to grind home a gratuitous political point. I would have thought this was one such time.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Thanks to Veterans the world over

You're welcome.
 
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