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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
OK, I have figured out a way to repair a bad Teves wheel speed sensor. At least for this type failure. Symptoms were: Ignition key to on, "Anti Lock" caution light illuminates, then extinguishes after a few seconds. OK, self test good. Start the car, same sequence. Illumination, then extinguishes after a few seconds. Still good to go. Start moving the car. No problems until- Uh-Oh. Turn the steering wheel to the right, Anti Lock caution light illuminates and remains on for the duration of the trip. Hmm. Place the car on jack stands, pull the right front wheel. The sensor gap is good, the wheel bearing play is good. But- the cable, although otherwise in good shape given its age, is cracked and frayed where it joins with the yellowed plastic cap into the sensor. Hmm, the woven metal shielding jacket that lies underneath the outer rubber layer is also badly frayed and torn. Out comes the ohmmeter. Nothing, unless I push down, bridging the gap and making a connection with the braided metal, then good to go at about 1100 ohms. So the problem is, there's not enough metal shielding protruding at the sensor. I carefully cut the yellowed plastic cap at the sensor with a hacksaw blade, and using small needle nose pliers, removed the plastic cap, exposing the last available metal shielding. I then used metallic tape to connect this last bit of woven metal over braid to the exposed metal over braid further up the cable. Voila. 1100 ohms again. Now we have to deal with strain relief. That, and the ravages of time, is what caused the failure. So I applied a generous amount of 3M adhesive all over the sensor, and up the cable, to seal and encapsulate the metallic tape. Let it harden, then apply a generous amount of Plasti-Dip over all the cable, followed by a LOT of good quality electricians tape at the sensor and up about three inches to move the bend point up the cable and away from the original failure point. Reassemble, fire it up, no more ABS caution light when I turn the steering wheel. Will let you know how this holds up.
 

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I once tried to solder the broken braid but I was unsuccessful. I think that it may be steel wire. I did not think of metallic tape. I have often used hot melt glue to "pot" repaired electrical connectors.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
A picture of a sketch to better visualize. Lift the front of the car onto jack stands. Reinstall the sensor, set the gap (.7mm, or the thickness of a wooden craft stick, perfect tool to reach in and check the gap) and sitting at the road wheel, rotate the wheel stop to stop and watch the sensor cable to ensure the strain relief you just added actually works (e.g., the cable must NOT bend at the top of the sensor). Your strain relief must move the bending point up the cable and away from the repaired area as the wheel deflects full travel left to right. If it is bending anywhere near the original failure point, add additional strain relief until the cable no longer flexes down at the repaired area. If it fails again there, you likely will destroy what's left of the braided metal at the top of the sensor if you attempt to remove your repair material and try a second repair at that location. Now go turn on the ignition switch. The ANTI LOCK caution light should illuminate, then extinguish after a few seconds. Move the steering wheel full lock to lock and ensure the light does not illuminate again. Congratulations! Button it up, lower the car, and go test drive con gusto!.
 

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