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This is my first post and your forum seems like a perfect place to get some answers.

I found this 1967 GTV and am absolutely in love with the car but not really sure I can afford it. The guy says it was a California car, 51k on the odometer, virtually rust free. He has owned it for 3 years, he never drove it and kept it in a garage. He said he paid $8600 for it and it had some damage to the rear taillight panel which he had fixed. The seller said that it runs and drives, of course he didn't have the keys when I met him. I did find the missing veloce emblem in the glovebox. The panel gaps on the trunk seem off as well as the passenger side door doesn't fit right. Are these panels adjustable and are they easy to do? Im no mechanic by any means so most of this will be a hobby for me and my kids.

The seller said he had listed it before and had an offer of $15k that he turned down hoping for more. He said he will not take a penny less than $15k for it, he has terminal cancer and is looking to sell it. The seller knows its worth something, but Im almost positive he doesn't have a clue what he has.

I will attach more picture of the engine but I did notice what may be the power steering pump leaking.

I live in midwestern United States and you just don't see these beautiful cars anywhere around here and that is whats drawing me to the car.

I have zero maintenance history on the vehicle or knowledge of where to look if its a #'s matching vehicle besides the pictures you see. Where is the engine stamped at?

Im looking at this as a possible investment/project fun car for my kids and I. Are these typically hard to maintain? Im sure parts are a pain in the ***, but are they available? Does anybody know of any around the midwest USA? Is there a mechanic or enthusiast in the area that may be able to help with repairs or appraisal? Is this a rare vehicle? Is there a place to get the serial # decoded to see what options it may have had that may increase the value?

Thank you
 

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At first I was going to say it looks like a 15k bargain, but I'm not so sure. It's hard to see from the photos you've taken, but it looks like the rockers have been bondoed over and there's some poor panel alignment. Gaps around the trunk lid could indicate more than a broken tail light. Rust is the main thing that could turn this into a very sour deal. Get a knowledgable Alfista to check it out thoroughly for you. Even if you don't see any rest assured there is. The question is how much. There's no power steering in these. You have a leaking steering box and will need it rebuilt or replaced. You also appear to have a later 2 liter engine - not the original. There are no matching numbers (engine/chassis) on these. Just correct block series. Send your VIN to Marco Fazio at Alfa Storico for details on original colors and build date. This is clearly a project. I would not look at it as an investment.
 

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you really need a inspection on a lift, the condition of the body is crucial for its value.
There are many bad repaired but reasonable looking cars around , in which correct repair of badly done work will cost more than fixinng a rusted but unmolested one.
If he payed around 8500 for it just a few years ago he would be wise , considering his health, to step out without los, so that part of the story, ignore it, it is no issue in the real value of the car.
 

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Do you really want to ge into this?

Agree with all of the above posts.
This is not an investment!

I have both vintage Alfas (Duetto and GTV) and a BMW (cs).

Parts for Alfas are much harder to find. And you are dealing with a nearly 50 year old electrical system and gauges.

If you are very patient, you could work on this car as a learning experience.

But, a BMW 2002 or an MG would be a much easier fun vintage car to begin on. Parts are plentiful. You can walk into a BMW dealer and order whatever you want.
Something to consider.

Get it on a lift and pay a body shop guy to come and look at it with you and you will learn a lot. He can point out where all the hidden rust is, and then you will get an idea of what is involved. or just fix it mechanically and drive a rusty Alfa. Lots of people do!

Scott
 

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It looks like the Burman steering box is leaking...
Even just changing the seal is quite a effort.
And a new box is expensive...
 

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At first I was going to say it looks like a 15k bargain, but ...... Get a knowledgable Alfista to check it out thoroughly for you.
Matt D (and several other responders) have hit the nail on the head: the key is how much rust this car has and how well any prior rust was repaired. You don't necessarily need a "knowledgable Alfista" to answer that; have a skilled body repair guy, one who is familiar with classic cars and has a lift, do a pre-purchase inspection.

IF this car doesn't have structural rust, $15K for a stepnose is cheap. Yes, this car needs some restoration, but if the body is sound, the rest is cosmetic - stuff that could be done over time.

But if the car does have structural rust, then it's tough to put a price on it. You'll really need to love it in order to put the time & money into a body restoration.

Jilogethan said:
The guy says it was a California car, ... virtually rust free.

I did notice what may be the power steering pump leaking.

Where is the engine stamped at?

Im looking at this as a possible investment/project fun car for my kids and I. Are these typically hard to maintain? Im sure parts are a pain in the ***, but are they available?

Is there a mechanic or enthusiast in the area that may be able to help with repairs or appraisal?

Is this a rare vehicle? Is there a place to get the serial # decoded to see what options it may have had that may increase the value?
To begin with, if you are sincerely interested in Alfas, pick up copies of Joe Benson's "Alfa Buyers Guide" and anything written by Pat Braden. Some quick answers to your questions:

Cars do rust here in California. Not as bad as in places that salt their roads, but since these cars had no real rust-proofing, even rain caused them to corrode.

No power steering on a 60's Alfa. The steering box might be leaking.

Engine # on right side of block, beneath the front carb. Matching #'s isn't so important on an Alfa.

No, Alfas aren't hard to maintain or to find parts for. Just noodle around the BB - you'll find more information on both of those topics. Investment potential? No low-cost classic is going to appreciate enough to offset your expenditures.

You mentioned living in the midwest, but that's a big place! Are there mechanics or enthusiasts in your area? Who knows? Where is "your area"?

Rare vehicle? Not really - tens of thousands were built. Fewer survive today, but compared with Lancias or Simcas, Alfas are still pretty common. You can contact Fiat-Alfa with the body number - people have posted the contact info here on the BB. Alfas really didn't offer options beyond body color back in the 1960's.
 

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A very nicely restored stepnose GTV is starting to appreciate quite impressively. It can cost a lot to get there, but it may be at the point on the value curve where you can do it and not get upside down at all. As others note, rust is a sign screaming "run away". If it really has little to no rust (look hard, and get impartial help), then write the guy a check immediately before it gets away.

Of all my Alfas, my 65 Sprint GT was the nicest driving and most fun. Same car as this one, except the GTV had a tiny bit more HP, and snazzier interior.

There are plenty of parts and they are easy to get. Very livable Alfa, and light enough to make good use of the 1600 engine, assuming that's what you still have. With a canister oil filter, it could be 1600, 1300, or 1750. I LOVED that 1600 engine.
 

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Regarding "matching numbers," I have the factory paperwork for my '67 GTV. It shows the engine number that came with the car, plus the VIN number. That's "matching," isn't it?
 

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Ok, as others have commented, apart from rust and dodgy repairs ??, the rest is pretty straight forward. Suppliers in the US include IAP, Centreline, while in the UK, Alfaholics, Classic Alfa, Highwood Motor Co and EB spares are all good sources for pretty much anything you might need for a Stepnose.

In terms of values, as a number have commented on while they weren't particularly rare given the numbers built, by todays standards Stepnoses are rarer than the later flush nose versions (1300/1600 Juniors, 1750, 2L GTVs). As a result, to an extent they can command higher prices when in good condition, but truthfully condition is paramount for any GTV and ultimately will influence their values.

One of the reasons why Stepnose cars seem to be more sought after is because with money and some work you can make one look and go like a GTA. Check out Alfaholics website for what they do and offer re parts. But it can get very expensive.

Unless it is rock solid and mechanically is reasonable, than IMHO $15K is a bit rich for the car. Its a little hard to tell from the photos as it seems that the car has sat for some time.
I would be surprised if it only has 51,000km on the clock given its age, more likely that it has gone around the clock once at least, but you never know.

In terms of panel adjustment, given the bodyshell is unitary construction, no you can't adjust the guards etc. The only areas for small adjustment might be the bootlid, doors and bonnet.

If you could get it for closer to $10-12K I would have thought that might leave you room to spend $$ on bringing it up to a sound condition.
 

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Regarding "matching numbers," I have the factory paperwork for my '67 GTV. It shows the engine number that came with the car, plus the VIN number. That's "matching," isn't it?
Sure, that's "matching". My point was that unlike Ferraris, having a non-original engine in an Alfa doesn't halve its value.

Cars like 356 Porsches have the body s/n stamped on doors, hood, and deck lid - so a matching numbers 356 can't even have a replacement hood. Early Corvettes have an even more complicated system that I don't begin to understand. Other than the engine, most Alfa parts have no serial number, and those that do have numbers weren't tracked by the factory.
 

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If you did the work yourself and paid youself a dollar an hour for labor it may be a good investment. Expecting a black ROI is the wrong reason to approach the car. Your return will be the time you spend with your son and that is priceless.
 

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also keep in mind that you won't want to drive that car in the winter time, ie, any time they might use salt. If you do, the car will tend to melt before your very eyes.

I did put 260k miles on one in the Seattle area without any significant rust, just a little around the front/rear windows, but that was it. Trust me, rain doesn't hurt it. Having said that, though, salt will cause it to disappear.
 

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Looks like a great car. I'll echo what everyone else said. Your one and only concern is rust and poor accident repair (a cousin of rust). Get any trusted body person, preferably one who owns a paint gauge and works on old cars to have a look. Besides that, all the impossible to find parts are there and the mechanicals are dead simple and widely available stateside and (with shockingly fast and affordable shipping) from the UK and continent.

Go for it! In my opinion a project car has to be something you love, and who in their right mind couldn't love a stepnose GT? They are heaven! You'll have many years of fun, frustrating, rewarding adventures with it.
 
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