Alfa Romeo Forums banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,631 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,166 Posts
A real sloppy job. What else did they rush and screw up on:confused:.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,087 Posts
Definitely "re-done on a budget". I also find that not replacing the canvas top with another canvas top says something about the desired quality of the re-do, since there just isn't a significant savings by using vinyl.

Best regards,
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,811 Posts
Might be a rattle-can job.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
10,166 Posts
It appears that the car was originally white - look at the underside of the front crossmember. So, someone took the trouble to pull the engine and disassemble all the components mounted in the engine compartment before painting the car. Similarly, painting the door jambs requires some disassembly and re-assembly. So, it is surprising that after all that work, some effort wasn't taken to mask the underside.

From what you can see in the ebay-quality pictures, the paint on the body's exterior surfaces looks OK - keep in mind that this is a $1,000 car - not something that aspires to Pebble Beach. A lot of body shops just don't understand why anyone would care whether suspension gets oversprayed. I don't think that this alone indicates that the paint wasn't well done. Still, I would be upset if I got my car back in this condition.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,205 Posts
Jay,
I don't think this car was ever white. I'm not defending the paint job, its obvious the overspray is pure lazyness. My 93 which is totally original has many large areas underneath which are sort of a light grey primer and probably shows up as white if not photoed right.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,449 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
I don't think the engine was removed. If you look on either side of the radiator, you can see where the paint looks a little older. It's possible that it was touched up under hood (though I can't see overspray).

The hood was clearly removed. Note that the hinges don't look as freshly painted and that the screws are unpainted (same is true for the trunk).

There's a lot of dust under the hood, though the brake MC and the airbox look to have been freshly (and poorly) painted.

My second '86 Graduate had been fairly poorly painted in the past (interestingly, by a very well known Midwestern Alfa repair shop) and showed lots of overspray underneath. But it was nothing like this! Though it did have some overspray on the Cromodora wheels (which were brand new just before it was painted).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
373 Posts
I gotta be honest, given my car's paint condition, I'd kill for that paint job, even with the overspray! ;)
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
129 Posts
Back in 6/87 I bought a brand-new BMW M3 with overspray like that. As I later found out, the passenger side of the car had been damaged, and repainted up at their port storage facility in South Carolina. The paint was perfectly-matched (Henna Red), and I only noticed after having had the car for a few weeks, as I was applying Rain-X to all the side windows. My paper towels were turning red, but I didn't at the time give it much thought. A few weeks later I had the wheels off, and as I was waxing them, the same thing happened with my rags. Finally I began to investigate, and found only the faintest tape lines inside the door jams, under the hood, and inside the trunk, and that's when I knew what had happened. I *****ed at BMW for several months, and did get them to repaint all the wheels, but I had to live with the underspray below the car, and eventually sold the M3 a few years later. Now for the punchline . . .

A similar thing happened to an attorney in Alabama who bought an '88 750iL with the same sort of repairs, at about the same time as mine. He sued BMW for not disclosing what had been done (apparently there's a limit), and was awarded a new 750iL and 3X the cost of his original car in punitive damages. if only I had known such a thing was possible and not fallen for BMW's stonewalling. . .
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
351 Posts
Well,
I have actually seen this car in person. My wife and I were visiting Tom Turner's shop at the time and he kindly gave us the 2 cent tour. It is true, this car does have paint conditions. However, considering that I have heard only good things about Mr. Turner I would assume that the mechanicals are top notch.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,631 Posts
Talk about Overspray

Back in 6/87 I bought a brand-new BMW M3 with overspray like that. As I later found out, the passenger side of the car had been damaged, and repainted up at their port storage facility in South Carolina. The paint was perfectly-matched (Henna Red), and I only noticed after having had the car for a few weeks, as I was applying Rain-X to all the side windows. My paper towels were turning red, but I didn't at the time give it much thought. A few weeks later I had the wheels off, and as I was waxing them, the same thing happened with my rags. Finally I began to investigate, and found only the faintest tape lines inside the door jams, under the hood, and inside the trunk, and that's when I knew what had happened. I *****ed at BMW for several months, and did get them to repaint all the wheels, but I had to live with the underspray below the car, and eventually sold the M3 a few years later. Now for the punchline . . .

A similar thing happened to an attorney in Alabama who bought an '88 750iL with the same sort of repairs, at about the same time as mine. He sued BMW for not disclosing what had been done (apparently there's a limit), and was awarded a new 750iL and 3X the cost of his original car in punitive damages. if only I had known such a thing was possible and not fallen for BMW's stonewalling. . .
I agree; for those that know what they're looking for overspray does not always indicate a poor or sloppy paint job, but instead is intended to disguise collision damage that has been fixed and was not disclosed. While it is difficult to prove, it can be done, given time and money, under the lemon law and inadequate disclosure. Pat discovered the overspray on the wiring harness of a Lexus that kept shorting out and the more he investigated he determined that it had, in fact, been hit, repaired improperly, and it was not disclosed.

Then came five plus years and oodles of money in the court before the plaintiff finally brought Lexus down successfully.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top