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Discussion Starter #1
Something I haven't seen discussed (or I completely glossed over it) is how to remove and install the tachometer and speedometer drive seals?

I think you have to drive out the pin on the gear end of the speedometer drive to pull out the shaft and seal?

Not sure on the tach drive.

Also, is there a source for the paper gaskets that go behind the drive units?

Any suggestions?
 

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yep, remove the gear and press the shaft out, then yank the seal.

I make mine out of gasket paper and cut em to fit.
 

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But Mad North-Northwest
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Tach drive I'm pretty sure you can just pull the seal out. Speedo drive involves removing the pin, yes, and it's a real #!%# to get out in my experience. Unless you're sure the seal is leaking I might just leave it.

Goats is right, you can just trace & cut the gaskets from gasket paper. My wife has a Cricut paper cutting machine, so what I did was scan the flange on my scanner, convert it to outline, and then had the machine cut it out of gasket paper. Very cool.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
The speedometer drive accidentally went through the carburetor cleaner, so I am sure it is toast like most of the seals that get in that stuff. Yes, you need a thin drift punch and a vice to hold it while driving the pin out is what I recall. It has been decades since I did that. Hence, the question. :)

I have some new tach drives I took out of water pumps that didn't have that need.

It is the paper gaskets that I was wondering how to deal with that. My inclination was to smear a thin layer of clear silicone to make it up.
 

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But Mad North-Northwest
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Yes, you can use a thin layer of silicone form-a-gasket in lieu of a paper gasket. Ultra black would be the right stuff in this case as it is the most oil-resistant. Personally I don't like that method as it's messy, hard to remove, and you can wind up with silicone squeeze-out inside the part if you're not careful.

A better option is to just trace and cut a new gasket from some bulk paper gasket material. No need for silicone in that case: a new paper gasket will seal fine and not leak provided the flanges are in anywhere near decent shape.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Yes, I am the purist when it comes to doing things right as that is the way I was taught. However, since there doesn't seem to be a source for the thin paper gaskets, one must consider others things. I do not slather silicone willy-nilly as it looks unprofessional and it does wind up in places it isn't supposed to be. I abhor the red heat silicone and have seen it in oil pans, so you can imagine how it got in there.

I have some gasket material here and will make a gasket(s).

Thank you for the tips! :)
 
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