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I have an 88 Milano Verde and it currently is running on the tired factory suspension. I'm looking into making it into a tack day car but it is not my daily driver so I'm not worried about making it too stiff or too low. I've considered the RSR coilover kit but I don't want to spend that kind of money just yet. I've purchased the 30 mm anit-sway bar from RSR and I am going to buy all new poly bushings. Which shocks/springs/torsions bars have people used and are happy with? I can't decide between Konis or bilsteins. I like the idea of the RSR adjustable rear spring perches but I don't know what spring rates to use. also, which rear spring rates would work with stock torsion bars? or should i even keep the stock torsion bars?

Any advice will help. thanks a lot for your help.
 

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Sorry, but anything that is remotely close to a "good" setup is going to be $$$

Nothing that RS has will be soft enough to work with stock torsion bar spring rates.

For what it's worth, I had 27mm torsion bars and Super Sport rear springs, with RS 28mm and 25.4mm sway bars. It was way too soft. I bought RS coilovers for the front with a 11kg spring and haven't looked back. I'm using a Camaro rear spring and Koni yellows to cut down on the cost of the full RS kit ...aka I'm only using the front of the RS coilover kit.
 

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I have 27mm torsion bars and perfotmatek rear springs with the car still at stock height (at least in the front). The 27mm bars pretty much were the difference between smacking the bumpstops regularly on the freeway and a car that rides comfortably. If you arent going to reinforce the front of the car at all IMO 30mm torsion bars would be better than coilovers, but either way will work. I prefer the way cars ride with bilstiens, and they are made with better quality parts than koni yellows, but you really need to try for yourself and see which you like. I have kinis on my car becase I paid $30 for the whole set, but i will get bilstiens when they wear out.
 

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There are three ways of doing this-

Buy a cheap and cheerful kit like the Harvey-Bailey or ours (Alfaholics) and a set of Koni Sports or Bilsteins (your choice, there isn't much between them). This will give you a decent ride, much improved handling, ground clearance and will be usable on the track. There'll still be a bit of roll and the front geometry won't be ideal for track use but for the lowest cost it's the way to go.

Or go to Ron and take his advice on what's best. This will cost lots more but will give you ultimate track handling and grip at the expense of reduced ground clearance and a ride quality that some people have described as a bit on the harsh side for the road.

Or buy bits and pieces from Ron/Alfaholics/Harvey Bailey/Shankle etc. and devise your own handling kit as Grant has done. Advantages are the cost will fall somewhere between the two options above and if you know what you're doing you'll end up with a great setup. Disadvantage is that if you don't know what you're doing you'll end up with a car that rides like a truck and still doesn't grip. And you'll have spent a load of money getting there.

For what you want to do I'd suggest the "talk to Ron" option. It may be more expensive but then so's changing bars and springs willy-nilly until you arrive at the right result. That aside, Ron fits his suspension to his Nurburgring cars which are driven by customers of all shapes, sizes and abilities so his kit has to be nicely balanced and forgiving in very challenging conditions. A home built kit may contain "vices" like lift off oversteer that makes it tricky on the limit.
 

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PS, I meant the 27mm torsion bars are too soft for TRACK USE. They are plenty stiff to have fun on the streets. Sorry, I really should have been more clear.
 

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Yes, I agree, ask JJ, he admits to spending a lot of money before settling on the full RS kit. I've also been willing to chat via PM's on what I've done and how it has been working out for me. It's a compromise, my car isn't as nice as the full RS kit (mainly I don't get progressive springs in the rear) but my lap times tell me I'm on the right track.

I should also mention that this is a slippery slope. You could be divorced before you know it :( jk jk

One more thing, I would recon that the kit I've ridden in/driven is more prone to snap-oversteer than my own car, but I'm sure carefully choosing spring rates will help find the right balance after talking to Ron or your importer of choice.

Whatever path you choose, a transaxle at full song on the track is a beautiful thing. Many smiles ahead!
 

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More On the camaro rear springs please. I too have an 88 verde. Stock other then lowered the front one notce. Handles great for starters. Will never see the track just spirited road and moiuntain driving. Is the rs kit overkill for this. Or do I just need different rear springs and bigger sway bars.
 

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More On the camaro rear springs please. I too have an 88 verde. Stock other then lowered the front one notce. Handles great for starters. Will never see the track just spirited road and moiuntain driving. Is the rs kit overkill for this. Or do I just need different rear springs and bigger sway bars.
I would say in order of importance:

Good tires

Replace any worn components

27mm torsion bars and matching springs ( I like the ones performatek sells that dont lower the car very much)

Swaybars if you think you still need them after doing the other stuff.

I dont know how the RSR kit rides on the street, but i think it would be hard on the car without some reinforcement in the front to handle the extra stress from the coilovers.
 

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I would say put in spider balls where the floppy rubber is. I think this is the number one thing to do first.
Then poly bush on the upper (A?)arm. and get the kit with the extra part to keep the poly from popping out.
Then re-bush every thing. poly where you can. And a uni-ball for the back. but good luck finding the pats IAP seems to be out. I think some of the other venders might have there own version of the uni-ball. Then and only after that you can start to think springs and shocks.
 

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By "spider balls" (I assume like eyes and legs, they have eight?) do you mean the ones at the front where the castor control arm meets the bodyshell?

I've used poly bushes there. I agree that the standard rubber ones are crap but modifying the car to take a ball joint here is a bit excessive for a trackday car. The poly ones take ten minutes a side to fit and transform the car.
 

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Actually, it's a pretty common modification here and has very few drawbacks. You would think it would make driving a bit harsh but that's not the case. The poly bushes bind a bit, the ball joint modification feels a little bit better on hard cornering IMO. That being said, for $$$ reasons I went with Poly bushes.

I think we scared the OP away.
 

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The ball joint conversion for the castor rod to chassis on Milano is a no-brainer in the handling department, though not entirely bolt-on.
Jes
 

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The ball joint conversion for the castor rod to chassis on Milano is a no-brainer in the handling department, though not entirely bolt-on.
Jes
I am not entirely clear on what we are talking about here. Where and how do you fit these things? Are they available as an Alfa spare part?
 

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Wouldnt those work on an x 1/9 also?
Don't think they would unless the X1/9 you got in the States was much better engineered than the European ones. Fiat tend to be a lot more "clever" (ie. cheap) than Alfa in the engineering of their cars.

If the X1/9 is like my 125 than you have something like the 75/Milano top arm but it's adjustable in length at the end by moving the nuts back and forth on the shaft. Alfa use a right hand/left hand threaded tube which probably costs four times as much and achieves much the same result...

You may get away with swapping bushes at the end with poly ones (something I've done on my 75 and will do on the Fiat) but it would take a whole lot of fiddling and fabrication to fit the Spider joint to the end of a Fiat rod. You'd probably end up welding bits of Milano and Fiat parts together and that's before you even think about how you're going to mount the ball joint to the actual bodyshell.
 

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