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Discussion Starter · #581 ·
100% gratuitous post. Was working down at Conrad's yesterday, took my new acquisition, a 1968 Ford Country Sedan, built in Mexico, 302 with three speed manual trans. Rare? Oh boy.
Well, the Multipla was out front so the shark is trying to eat the minnow. Kind of an extreme of wagons/people movers here. The Multipla seats 6, remarkably, but the Ford seats 10, 3 and 3 and 4 in the jump seats in the wayback. The Ford's engine is 5.0, the Multipla's is 0.8 (an oversize 600). Six times as big.
I bought in Oxnard and drove home Sunday. So cool.
Andrew
 

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Discussion Starter · #584 ·
Have 8 more kids?
I grew up in, and learned to drive on, a 65 Falcon Squire wagon. This is familiar in some ways but much bigger. Our Falcon was 289, auto trans, manual drums, manual steering. This has the 3-speed Toploader, power disks, power steering. You have no sense whatsoever about the state of the tires' contact with the road. That said, it's fun and man do you get attaboys in it. It was on SF CL, but located in Oxnard and he had it on LA CL too. A number of folks looked at it but no one plumped. I had a friend inspect it, committed, drove down Sunday afternoon, drove it home Monday on 101. 65 mph, 15 mpg, no issues. Stumbly a bit off the mark, needs carb and ignition attention but basically works fine. Stunning interior, original, repainted once in original color. Someone else brought it in from Mexico so I didn't have to deal with that. It's a 68 but didn't have to meet US smog and safety standards so has no smog equipment, no belts or shoulder harnesses, headrests, marker lights, locking steering column, nothing.
Plan? Tune, fix, enjoy. I won't keep indefinitely but I do like my old Fords. Eventually will likely go BaT route.
Andrew
 

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I generally like wagons of all flavors, no doubt partly based on childhood memories. The Ford's a beaut. The Multipla, on the other hand, may be a taste I haven't yet acquired.
 

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Love the ford! I'm old enough to remember those land beasts roaming the landscape in the '70s!

The Multipla is great, I would love one in full Milano Taxi livery. They are soo nice in that black and green scheme!
Wheel Tire Vehicle Car Window
 

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OK, the shiny Multipla is a little more appealing. Kind of reminds me of a miniature version of Buckminster Fuller's Dymaxion Car.
 

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Discussion Starter · #588 ·
Conrad uses that Multipla as a daily driver. He has another he's building up with a 903 in it.
He and I fly the flag for daily driving old cars, putting our money where our mouth is. I drive my Super every day but, when you gotta Ford, what a choice.
This car is so unsafe at speed due to lack of handling and any road feel, how on earth was the US not littered with head-on collisions, runs off cliffs, etc.? It's criminal, nearly.
Andrew
 

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That whole state of affairs built Ralph Nader's career and modern consumer-advocate politics, for better or worse.

Also why a tiny minority in the US bought Alfa sedans, etc., back in the day.
 

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Discussion Starter · #590 ·
He chose his targets but all US cars, except maybe second series Camaros, handled like mierda.
I had a 65 Mustang, 289 with three-speed, I converted to four-speed. Came with manual drum brakes. OMG, just awful. And the handling in stock form? No question it was a Falcon under there even with good tires and shocks.
Andrew
 

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Im slowly trying to make mine into a 'daily driver' choosing to drive it much more than the modern BMW.
 

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Discussion Starter · #592 ·
Multiplas are a staple of auctions, and BaT, much like Jollys. But do folks use them? I doubt it. But Conrad does. I see this one pass my house most days, and he took the other one to Pebble Beach and back for the Concours. Dialing it in.
Andrew
 

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And yet if you go to a car show, even here in little New Zealand, it is 80% American cars of that period or older maybe 50s ... go figure

My father says the late 30s and 40s American cars were ahead of the game. What happened?
Pete
 

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My view is that the consumer demand from the US post-war prosperity and a sort of gentleman's club (w/o strippers) monopoly arrangement between the Big 3 lead to the decline of the industry here. David Halberstrom's The Reckoning is a great read on the subject, if you can find a copy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #595 ·
After the war Americans had a lot of money, wanted luxury, smoothness, ease. The post-war economy concentrated on that, including big comfy cars, freeways, suburbs. So American cars developed along those lines. Comfy, quiet, heat and AC, lots of convenience, plenty of power, smooth ride. The roads were built for this. The cars are horrible to drive.
Andrew
 

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... took my new acquisition, a 1968 Ford Country Sedan, built in Mexico, 302 with three speed manual trans. Rare? Oh boy.
I grew up in, and learned to drive in, a '66 Country Sedan in almost that exact color. We were not Country Squire people. 390 2 bbl., auto of course. That car covered the Rocky Mtn west, the SW, Canada, and a 4000 mile round trip to Mexico. I spun it on ice once as a teenage idiot - missed parked cars by inches.
 

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Discussion Starter · #597 ·
I was an Air Force brat. We bought our Falcon Squire new in Wichita just before my dad went to Vietnam. We'd previously had a huge pink Dodge wagon. Gotta have a wagon for the innumerable cross-country trips such families enjoy/endure. My brother and I drove it solo from VA to CA, him 18 and me 15, when our dad retired in 1974. Was a great car, for the time. White, red interior, wood on the sides. Often had an 8-foot Sabot on the roof and sometimes and MGA Twin Cam behind (see pic). This is my dad, we're headed to Willow Springs, April 1975, for an Oldtimer's Vintage race. He'd raced this car SCCA in Texas 15 years earlier.
Andrew
 

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That's funny! The car we traded in for the '66 Galaxie was a pink 1960 Dodge station wagon with the big rocket taillights. And he built a wooden El Toro, which is the same as a Sabot. It was on the roof of the Galaxy every week!
 

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Discussion Starter · #599 ·
So are you in SoCal? Yep, my dad and his brother were dyed in the wool Sabot guys, Mission Bay Yacht Club. The family had like six at one point, everyone raced. Still have one Brian Thomas (sp) the red/white/blue one, my cousin swears he's going to restore.
I've seen El Toros, but never been in one. Most recently, a friend bought a 356C out of an old guy's garage in Oakland, El Toro in the rafters.
Andrew
 

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Nope, I grew up in Denver. I seem to remember a lot of the El Toros came from the Bay Area. When we hosted the Nationals at high altitude Grand Lake, we got a lot of Californians over to race. They were very good sailors, but had no experience with eddies swirling around the mountains, which gave the locals a fighting chance!
 
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