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Discussion Starter #1
Not sure what my options are... Working on changing the master cylinder and brake booster. While trying to get the last brake line in on the master cylinder, the one facing down. It looked as if the early threads were getting a tiny bit worn. I took the old MC, thinking I could use it to clean the threads up as it was easier to access. I managed to strip the nut a good bit. Hoping there is an easier solution other than replacing the entire line. Looks like there is enough line to cut the line replace the bolt and re flare the line. Although I've never done that or have the flaring tool. And, assuming thats an option.
 

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Take a couple pictures. Someone who has parted out a hanging pedal car will likely have one for cheap, especially if you state your location.
 

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It is almost impossible to fix a stripped fitting in the car. You might have a better chance at APE as larry may have a used one.... it is better if a new line cold be put on though.... good luck
 

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You might be able to reflare the line, but you'll need to take the whole line off. Don't try it in-situ. You'll get metal shavings in the line that could eventually destroy your MC or calipers.

With a cheap flaring tool, I find it takes some practice to get a good flare. You might want to practice on a junk line if possible if you've never done it before. Don't forget to buy a cutter and deburring tool. If you don't expect to do hard line work in the future, you may be better off just buying a complete line.
 

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It sounds like a classic rounding of the points on the flare nut because you attempted to use an open ended wrench ( absolute no-no) rather than a flare nut wrench. An open end wrench will round a tough nut faster thatn you can say " make my day" . It is possible to carefully file the flats on the buggered flare nut with calipers in hand to an undersized SAE size and save the day and then use the proper wrench.... This is my take on your dilemma. SAE Double-End Flare Nut Wrench Set, 5 Pc.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Nope, used the correct wrench... not my first master cylinder. It's the start of the thread that wouldn't grab. Talked to Gianni at Difatta. His thought was that sometimes over tightening the nut on install flattens out the flare at the end of the hard line, not allowing it to enter and be tightened... He usually rounds over the ends a little bit. So, maybe not my fault.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
All solid points Nealric. I wasn't feeling good about that course of action. Thanks for confirming that. Off to find a complete hard line.
 

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Nope, used the correct wrench... not my first master cylinder. It's the start of the thread that wouldn't grab. Talked to Gianni at Difatta. His thought was that sometimes over tightening the nut on install flattens out the flare at the end of the hard line, not allowing it to enter and be tightened... He usually rounds over the ends a little bit. So, maybe not my fault.
I had to go for the most common mistake. .. not an affront,
 

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You're sort of in luck. The line under the master goes to the left front caliper and is the easiest least tedious one to replace.

I wouldn't say it is impossible to redo a flare on the line in place, but it would involve removing the master for space. But if you can get a good used line, it is a sure fire way of fixing this.

If all else fails, some auto part stores sell pre-flared lines. Alfas use "bubble" flares which are peculiar to European vehicles, but the nuts are 3/8 UNF. Some available here and labeled "British" or "Girling" lines.
 

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Also it would be advised to start all lines with the master cyl loose. Most of the time these lines will almost bottlom out then tighten the master and lines. Remember it is good to bleed the master at the lines too. Good luck
 

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I've had to change brake lines and it's not as difficult as you may think. Before starting, take a look at what the job will entail. My guess is that there's going to be a few clamps that need to be removed, but otherwise I think it's pretty straightforward. Also, before starting, make sure the bleeder screw loosens - it should, since you need to bleed the lines after doing a master cylinder change.

You know how these things go. Start with a simple master cylinder change, then a bolt strips. Now you change the line and then go to bleed the thing and the bleeder is frozen. You pull the caliper to fix the bleeder and you notice that the seals on the caliper are bad ...
 

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I have replaced flare nuts in situ, you only have to cut the flare off so maybe loose 5mm of length. new nuts are available but not always easy, you just need a good flare tool, cheers Ian
 
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Discussion Starter #15
I have replaced flare nuts in situ, you only have to cut the flare off so maybe loose 5mm of length. new nuts are available but not always easy, you just need a good flare tool, cheers Ian
Could you recommend a brand of flare tool you use?
 

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I was trying to find a tool, and I found this video which shows clearly how a flare is made. Their tool is pretty different from most, but it would be easier to use in situ. The authors of the video unfortunately do not carry this tool anymore on their website - eeuroparts.com, but the part number traces it to a CTA product available on Amazon and elsewhere.

I think I want one.

Edit: CTA 9212 is a multi size kit. ATD 5480 is specifically 3/16, identical construction, and will be much less expensive.
 

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