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I took off my wood rimed stock wheel and replaced it with a Grant all leather black one. In making the change-over, I cannot seem to figure out the purpose of the spring loaded sleeve that goes over the shaft just before the retainer "cog"
It seems to just making the installation very difficult, and perhaps is only useful for the auto-return of the turn signal indicator.
But the indicator returns just fine without it.
Perhaps it is there to hold the small cog in place. (t'would be a disaster if it slipped out!). But it seems to only try to push that little sucker out!
Whats up?

..Keeth Lawrence
 

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Yeah, what's up?

I had to drill off a beat up Hellebore (which I had hoped to pull and use every effort to restore). I couldn't pull the darn thing off with a gear puller. Ended up drilling, getting oil around the tapered steering wheel column, and sledging it off. Broke my heart.

And I selected the wrong hub adapter, so now I need to pull that adapter off the column, after receipt of a substitute.

What am I missing here?
 

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possibly,that is for the spring-return of the turn-signals.

im running non-stock, a Nardi classico wheel. its sick and i love it, but the turn-signals dont return to center, and im betting the mechanic just came into the same frustration that you have...
 

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I had to drill off a beat up Hellebore (which I had hoped to pull and use every effort to restore). I couldn't pull the darn thing off with a gear puller. Ended up drilling, getting oil around the tapered steering wheel column, and sledging it off. Broke my heart.
The "trick" is to use a steering wheel puller with the correct bolts. There are threaded holes in the factory wheels to facilitate the pulling process. This should work to pull an aftermarket hub as well.

I have tried to pull wheels using other methods and never been sucessful. Using a steering wheel puller, I've never had a problem, the wheels usually come off with little drama.

I think the reason a wheel puller works where gear pullers fail is the force needs to be applied directly parallel to the steering shaft - otherwise it will cause the hub to bind on the shaft making things even harder.

Joe
 

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Thanks Joe. Getting kotter pins for my tie rod and track bar end replacement (and a tie rod tool), I found a generic steering wheel puller, but it needs longer bolts to work properly. And thanks for shipping the later style hub. The Nardi wheel looks fabulous... and really feels great, too.

The more I mess with Alfas, the more I want a garage full of original factory tools!
 

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wow. headsup: Ebay Item number: 160110551068

sweet wheel
 

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I forget the pitch, but the bolts are 6mm.

My recommendation is just to get some threaded 6mm steel rod and cut your own. That way they'll be plenty long.
 

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Will know for sure later this week...

JoeCab advised the bolt size was 8mm X 1.25 pitch.

I picked up a set of such bolts, and will advise later this week if they're the right ones.
 

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JoeCab advised the bolt size was 8mm X 1.25 pitch.
This is the size bolt you would use to remove one of Centerline's aftermarket hubs, not a stock steering wheel.

Joe
 

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I just double-checked, and the stock holes for my OEM Milano wheel are M6 x 1.0. I assume the Spider is the same.
 

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So, getting back to the "spring return tube"(?)...I'm stuck there now as well.

What is the trick to getting it back on?
 

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My approach

I have a screwdriver that takes replaceable tips, with a hex head nut on the side which mates to the screwdriver. Here's how I put a wheel/adapter back on.

First, I black taped the horn wire connection, so I didn't have to disconnect the battery, and then got everything I needed close at hand: the woodruff key, the wheel/adapter, and the screwdriver WITHOUT a bit in it.

I aligned the steering wheel base with the woodruff key spot a couple of times in preparation for actually doing a "simultaneous equation." I tinkered with the turn signal return spring tensions to tighten up the tension properly for each turn signal direction and return, and then with wheel/adapter ready to slide over the woodruff key/slot and with woodruff key in my left hand thumb and forefinger, I used the somewhat blunt edge of the screwdriver without bits and pushed it down the steering column as far as it would go (the spring/column bushing slipped out several times before I was successful, and I dropped the woodruff key down the base of the steering wheel cover several times... ending up using hex wrenches to remove hex bolts and drop it sufficiently to salvage the woodruff key in the bottom of the steering column/ignition/turn signal/light switch plastic base cover).

After getting the steering column spring bushing pushed down, and keeping it pushed as far as it would go, I put the woodruff key in and smoothly and simultaneously, slid the steering wheel/adapter over the woodruff key while continuing to hold the steering column bushing back. As soon as the woodruff key was covered, I used a covered/padded, flat piece of wood over the adapter in my case and tapped it enough to get the attachment bolt on the threaded steering column (remember to use the lock tab). Then it was a 27mm (I think -- same size as the oil drain plug) socket on the end of an extension, with a rachet wrench, to tighten down the adapter (or wheel) all the way.

It was a miserable job, as my wheel was frozen to the column after years of use. Had to drill channels to get some lube between the column and tapered wheel bearing... By the time I got the wheel off, I was dripping in sweat from the effort. The reverse process was easier, but still quite a test of dexterity.

I've got to swap out the steering wheel adapter, and do it again this week! With the learning curve, it will go more quickly the 2nd time. And instead of a pitman puller, I'll be using a proper steering wheel puller. I should always remember, if there's a proper tool for a job, get the tool, then do the job.
 
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