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Discussion Starter #1
My car has its original wheel rims in steel. They are 14" with currently 195's. I am keen to go back to a narrower tyre and if possible keep these rims. The edges of three of them have been scuffed and a few small indentations after 52 years. I have local place that can refurbish them with sandblasting and fix up the edges with some heat and metal work. However, it seems that Alfa rims are un-numbered or stamped as original and I do wonder about the value of doing this.

Are new steel rims still available? Most of the new rims seem to be alloy (probably a good thing) and most are in 15"
 

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My car has its original wheel rims in steel. They are 14" with currently 195's. I am keen to go back to a narrower tyre and if possible keep these rims. The edges of three of them have been scuffed and a few small indentations after 52 years. I have local place that can refurbish them with sandblasting and fix up the edges with some heat and metal work. However, it seems that Alfa rims are un-numbered or stamped as original and I do wonder about the value of doing this.

Are new steel rims still available? Most of the new rims seem to be alloy (probably a good thing) and most are in 15"
I don't think anyone is making new steel wheels, only alloy as you mentioned. Some good choices in alloy but most are 6" wide. You could still run a 175 tire on those which is narrower than your 195's. There's value in fixing your old ones if they're not too bad. Wheel restorers can do wonders. Just balance the cost vs new ones. Maybe get new wheels but keep the old ones in the event that you sell someday? Just my opinion, your actual mileage may vary.

Chuck
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Yes Chuck, my experience in these things is to keep the original rims if possible, but that experience is mostly with old Porsches and their rims are all stamped, numbered and valued. Originality on the Alfa ones may be a misplaced objective?

I like the balance and feel of the narrower tyres on older cars as it seems to suit their original steering and suspension so well. 195 must increase steering weighting and load on the steering box.
 

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I believe your rims are either 5" or 5.5". I also believe you need to remove the tire to see the manufacture and size unlike on a Porsche rim where you can see this by removing the hub cap. I have these wheels on my 67 GTJr. and run them with 165's which is an excellent size for this rim.

Joe
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
Thanks Joe. The Porsche original rims are quite prized. I was thinking about how to measure my Alfa wheel width without removing the tyre. I had Veredstein 165s on my 68 911. Marvellous tyre and great road feel and suspension balance.

I used a protractor and a laser to measure the existing wheel width. It came out at 6.5"! But then I realised I was using the outer rim as measuring points, not the inner rim where the tyre sits ... So measuring that the difference is at least ... 1/2" each side (?) then they are indeed 5.5" (we are all metric here since 1966).
 

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All the 14” period steelies seem to be 5.5” wide. The 15s on earlier cars were 4.5”.
Classic Alfa markets a few 5.5” alloy wheel for Supers, if that appeals, as may others.
 

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Most people don't know how to restore steel rims. Steel rims often get stuffed up with incorrect repair processes that render them in a poor state, like sand (glass or garnet) blasting which deposits media inbetween the tight spots. If you are going to clean them it has to avoid these two types of media near the tight spots and swage lines, Chemical cleaning has it's own issues with chemical residue left behind that affects the painting process.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
True Steve. I can see some media residue in the crack between the setter piece and the rim from the last attempt. Since my new choices of 5.5" x 14" wheels seems nil, my main concern was finding someone who actually works on steel wheels these days. I seem to have found a good place with lots of experience in these jobs. I am happy to prep and paint the wheels myself with the Argent Silver wheel paint I have obtained.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
All the 14” period steelies seem to be 5.5” wide. The 15s on earlier cars were 4.5”.
Classic Alfa markets a few 5.5” alloy wheel for Supers, if that appeals, as may others.
CA don't seem to have any wheels in 14" x 5.5" with a hub cap retainer?
 

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Discussion Starter #11 (Edited)
That’s it then, it seems. The only 14 x 5.5 wheel that CA has is the Campo replica (out of stock). I do like my hub caps with the large ring.
 

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1613788

If you remove the tires, you will I think find the same markings as I have on my wheels, making them out to be original CMR, made in october 1968, and in size 14 x 5,5. My rims I think responded quite well to restoration, and were then shod with period Pirelli Cinturato 165´s.
1613789

We then used the original specification brass lugnuts, with right hand threading on the right hand side of the car and vice versa. Or if it was the other way around......... I always forget......
1613790
 

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Discussion Starter #13
That is good to know about the stamping. I like the silver they used on your wheels-not too bright. The brass lug nuts are a nice touch although the reverse threading nuts is an original aspect I could live without :rolleyes:. Nice update.
 

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By using aggressive abrasive media to remove the paint and rust which some times removes the crisp round swag lines around the base of the raised circles or just laying on too much primer and paint, is an unsatisfactory solution for a high quality restoration in my opinion.
The wheels had AR003 paint code
 

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Discussion Starter #17
I did that but couldn’t see it in AUS. Did you get it mixed by a painter from the formula? Argent Silver (Eastwood) is reportedly the same as is Ford Argent Silver ( out of stock). Both are designed for wheels with their higher temps.
 

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oh **** didn't know there was anything stamped inside the wheel, i just changed my tires but didn't think to look and see if there was any data stamped inside
 

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My early 68' Berlina has a stamp on the outside just to be different!

Haven't had the rubber off to find the internal stampings...

Cheers.
1614099
 
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