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There is a ride-height discontinuity between Tis and Supers and GTVs and Spiders. A lot of TI and Super owners have been surprised to find that fitting "1 inch lower" springs from a GTV actually made their Supers a lot lower than expected. Since the suspensions appear to be the same it's only logical to think the ride heights for all 105 series cars should be the same. Alas, they are not, resulting in numerous TI and Super owners fitting springs that made their cars lower than anticipated. Bruce/Alfanuts did us all a favor by collecting actual ride height information of various lowering spring installs along with stock ride height information.

As published, the AH information is a bit circumspect (Classic ALfa's description is a bit clearer) about this difference, although with a little extrapolating it looks like if the "B" kit could drop a Super up to 2.5 inches then the "A" kit should provide less of a drop (perhaps 1 incn) when installed on a Super. Bruce's data is helpful here.

From Alfaholics:

Comprehensive advice on fitting, ride heights etc., is given on purchase of the kit. 3 different ride height kits are available to ensure the kit is tailored to your individual specific requirements and usages (Kit A, Kit B or Kit C). Kit A is our standard ride height kit for Giulia saloon or rough rally spec increased ride height for GT, Kit B lowers GT/Spider 1″ from standard (making a Giulia 2-2.5″ lower)
 

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It’s funny you quote that. I was about to post the same discrepancy. I dug through my email and found his recommendation for the B springs stating the 1” drop for the Giulia. Yet the site says 2.5.

I want 1” at most.

EDIT - I think I am going to do everything but the springs at the moment. Attack them later. I can't express enough how bad the roads are here, it's developing world stuff. I really want to get spring rate/damper set up correctly. Too stiff in daily use and these roads will rattle the car apart. I will frequently be having passengers in the rear, so I need to be careful. May need to go custom spring rate? Koni red in rear, Yellows up front.

Going back to Bruce's table, and his comments - I think I need to target the "middle"
 

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There are so many threads on suspension but this one is getting some recent traffic...

...I have a thread about my imported Super. It's time to get to work, build the list of winter projects. The suspension on the car is crap, totally worn out. All of it, bushings, shocks, etc.

In the in the long term, I definitely want a slightly tuned ride, improved handling, etc. I live outside of Philadelphia and our roads are crap so I cannot go too harsh. A bit of lowering does not bother me, I will never upgrade beyond 15" wheels. I have 14" now and like the high sidewall.

I like the simplicity of the alfaholics "fast road" kit. It's all there - but I worry it is a bit too much lowering and too harsh. I'm looking through all of the threads and what sucks it that I have to seat time in a tuned 105 so I have nothing to go by. Guessing by the road conditions here I need to watch the spring rate and shocks to mitigate the harshness. Sticking with the 14" wheels will certainly help too. I did email alfaholics at one point and got a response suggesting the fast road kit but use koni reds instead and substitute 1" drop springs from the kit B.

I trust the wisdom of the BB.....

Purely judging by looks, Gasolina I love the look at least of your ride height....
I used the Alfaholics front geometry kit with stock front springs and the Classic Alfa Rear Springs (SU118) and the ride height is about perfect (maybe .5" lower than perfect) and it handles like a dream. Super tight and sticky!
 

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Going back to Bruce's table, and his comments - I think I need to target the "middle"
A phrase we used at work was that design should be "fit for purpose". Closed course racers are set up differently from cross-country rally cars which are set up differenty from street cafe racers, versus touring cars, versus commuters. The urge to set up race cars for rough roads and touring is crazy. I set my 72 Pino verde car for touring with some luggage and provisions on rougher roads with a bit of comfort. It's in the mid-range. Bilstein B6 Sports in front to minimize nose dive and Koni reds in the rear to full soft. Latest revision of chart attached in PDF.
 

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A phrase we used at work was that design should be "fit for purpose". Closed course racers are set up differently from cross-country rally cars which are set up differenty from street cafe racers, versus touring cars, versus commuters. The urge to set up race cars for rough roads and touring is crazy. I set my 72 Pino verde car for touring with some luggage and provisions on rougher roads with a bit of comfort. It's in the mid-range. Bilstein B6 Sports in front to minimize nose dive and Koni reds in the rear to full soft. Latest revision of chart attached in PDF.
Couldn't agree more. My car is meant for real roads, potholes and all, 4 up, with stuff in the trunk. Its interesting that you don't know the springs? I'll attack everything but the springs. You are not the first person to suggest mixing dampers front and back. My mechanic in Italy liked yellows up front and reds in the back. You suggest something similar with the bilsteins up front, and reds in the back.

Thanks
 

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You are not the first person to suggest mixing dampers front and back. My mechanic in Italy liked yellows up front and reds in the back. You suggest something similar with the bilsteins up front, and reds in the back.
It's all a matter of taste and personal preference, of course, and most people like the shocks they put on and will probably drive on for the life of their Alfa ownership. I've been using Koni yellow sport-setting shocks on my Alfas for going on 5 decades now. I prefer them over gas shocks and stock setting shocks, including Koni reds. (I started using Koni "SP1" shocks which were the sports shocks before they were painted yellow.) I find that they work exceptionally well with Alfa's stock suspension. Handling is definitely improved. Turn-in on decreasing radius corners is especially enhanced because you can actually feel the Koni's working to control my Super's suspension movements---something I haven't found with stock setting shocks. I think what I'm experiencing is the better balance between shocks and springs that the Koni yellow shocks provide.

I changed from worn-out stock shocks to Koni yellows on my Super a few years ago (when I removed an attached 'Granny" overload spring which was a definite handling impediment---see Bruce's suspension measurements). The improvement in handling was both substantial and expected.

We have our share of bad roads here in Texas and I've not found the sports setting Koni's to be overly harsh. There's a reason Alfaholics, who know a thing or two about Alfa suspensions, recommend Koni yellow shocks (set full-soft) for their fast-road kits
 

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Hey guys,

Finally got round to tackling the suspension on my Giulia. It's all certainly doable on stands in the garage, but boy is my body feeling a little beat up from all the lying down and crawling around under the car..!! ;)

Anyway, very happy with the result of installing the Alfaholics kit B springs up front and kit C in the back.... Koni yellow's all round... initial impressions felt good. Still sitting on the 14" steels for now...

Before the change I could stick just a bit more than a fist between the front tyre and the wheel arch (very scientific) ... now I think it sits just great. My own opinion of course!! ;) (Before photos a few posts back!)

1603521


1603522
 

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Anyway, very happy with the result of installing the Alfaholics kit B springs up front and kit C in the back.... Koni yellow's all round... initial impressions felt good. Still sitting on the 14" steels for now...

Would you please take measurements---distance from the ground to the jacking point---of your ride height so Bruce/Alfanuts can add them to his Giulia Super spread sheet? It really helps others to know what ride height you got with this suspension install.
 

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Couldn't agree more. My car is meant for real roads, potholes and all, 4 up, with stuff in the trunk. Its interesting that you don't know the springs? I'll attack everything but the springs. You are not the first person to suggest mixing dampers front and back. My mechanic in Italy liked yellows up front and reds in the back. You suggest something similar with the bilsteins up front, and reds in the back.

Thanks
The Bilstein B6 Sports up front and Koni reds in the rear at full soft is a setup many Dutch/Belge guys use, typically without an anti-sway bar in fact. The Bilsteins up front are a bit twitchier BUT prevent nose dive in my usual country road swales and bumps that are held down by fluid shocks and the car oil pan then bottoms out. A fluid shock tends to flex in the compression and then hold it down. It's held more level with the gas shocks. Since the front springs were on my car when I bought it and there was no informaiton on them, I do not know what they are, but they appear to be stiffer than stock. My rears are arguably Berlina springs that have been cut down to about 1" below stock ride height. The front is also now about 1" below stock height.

Edit: added pic of my green Super for reference, 15" wheels.
DSCN5623A.jpg
 
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