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Discussion Starter #1
Hello -

What would I need to convert a 2000 motor (SPICA removed) to the mechanical fuel pump setup? I see in the parts book I need the pump and front engine cover from a Euro Spider, anything else?

Why you ask...because I don't like electric fuel pumps on carbureted engines.

Thanks in advance

Brad
 

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It's a big job. In terms of parts, you need the front cover, push rod(s) and pump mount, depending on the particular setup of your front cover (couple variants). But to assemble that, you need the head, pan, and pulley off the engine. If the engine is already apart, great. If not, I personally don't think it's worth the hassle til you have a reason to have the engine apart.
I've had the Facet box-type electrical pump on three Giulia sedans for 25ish years with Webers, no pressure regulator other than the stock fuel bowl/filter and it's been fine.

Andrew
 

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Hi Brad,

I have to agree with you after an engine fire in my Spider Jr. They're simple and reliable and once the engine stops no more fuel to the fire without any extra switches and wiring. OTOH the mechanical fuel pump took more starter time to fill the carbs when the engine hadn't been run for awhile. I'll be putting an ex-Spica engine in my car and I'm looking forward to seeing how possible this is. I do seem to remember reading that the front engine cover doesn't easily move from engine to engine. We'll see when I get farther along in my project.

Mitch
 

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"Why you ask...because I don't like electric fuel pumps on carbureted engines."

Please excuse my ignorance but why not?

I am about to remove my mechanical and fit an electrical pump. I had a Fiat 124 a few years ago and the mechanical fuel pump membrane failed, which resulted in my crank-case filling with petrol (not ideal).

I am running Dellortos.

Just curious.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Ironically the very reason I don't love electric pumps is because of the reliability of mechanical pumps and years of good service from them on FIAT 124 Spiders. Of course on a 124 all you have to do is bolt on the pump and you've converted...no rods, no covers, etc.

This may be a worthwhile project once I yank the motor out, but I'm not doing that right now. Parts acquisition may be the way I go although it sounds like I need to scour a junkyard in Europe.
 

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All in all I agree with you; I'd rather have a mechanical pump.

One option is to put an oil-pressure-driven pressure switch in the electrical line to the pump. When oil pressure stops, fuel pump stops. Though that can make cold starts after long periods tough. A check valve will solve that. This can get complicated.

Spica cars have pumps that run whenever the ignition is on. Late ones (75 and later?) have inertial switches (usually routed around by now) that shut off the pump when the car hits something hard enough to jostle the switch or goes upside down.

A good safety measure is to make sure you have good fuel lines. OEM BMW 8/13 rubber (not kevlar) is affordable, strong, and will outlast American or Euro rubber hoses.

Andrew
Andrew
 

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All in all I agree with you; I'd rather have a mechanical pump.

One option is to put an oil-pressure-driven pressure switch in the electrical line to the pump. When oil pressure stops, fuel pump stops. Though that can make cold starts after long periods tough. A check valve will solve that. This can get complicated.

Spica cars have pumps that run whenever the ignition is on. Late ones (75 and later?) have inertial switches (usually routed around by now) that shut off the pump when the car hits something hard enough to jostle the switch or goes upside down.

A good safety measure is to make sure you have good fuel lines. OEM BMW 8/13 rubber (not kevlar) is affordable, strong, and will outlast American or Euro rubber hoses.

Andrew
Andrew
Unfortunately I learned the lesson about old fuel lines the hard way. The Spica's had an inertial switch as well. Since they're over 30 years old I'm not sure if they're still reliable. The racing shops have modern replacements.

Looks like a number of us got our start on 124's. Mine was a 71 coupe, too bad so few survived.
 

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Luckily the oem inertia switches are easily disassembled and made like new.
 

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There are two 124 coupes on SF craigslist right, amazingly. I got started on 850s (five of them in all) in 1975, then jumped [down] to the world's rattiest Giulia TI.
Andrew
 

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Brad,
Add a fuel pressure regulator/filter to the list as well (if it isn't already).
And you may want to consider a Euro upper oilpan (unless you don't mind having two dipsticks).
 
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