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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just took my spider drive shaft into local drive shaft specialists, vibration in drive train on accelerating in 1st, and also through range of engine speeds, especially decelerating over bumpy roads. They seem quite sure that the vibration is coming from the splined coupling; the guy at the counter went straight to this segment of the shaft without even looking at the UJ's or support bearing. This will be expensive to repair. I was surprised to hear this since I cannot recall this having been discussed in the forum. Is the splined coupling an established source of trouble? Is a small amount of play a big problem here, ie is zero play essential?

I know that the support bearing is too floppy and was going to hang the problem on that and a deeply split Giudo. Going to replace both of these anyway.

Suppose the only way to know is to have it fixed?

Thanks for any comments.

TS
 

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Some depends on the vintage of the shaft, and if it was correctly assembled , front and rear section. Correctly assembled, and lubricated, the splined section is good unless it has been submerged in water for a while. Generally, some of the OLDER shafts (rear) develop bows due to the old manufacturing method shared by Ferrari. The tubes were jig welded, and checked for end to end bows. If any were found, the bowed area was heated with a cool torch and quenched with water, shrinking the long side. Whoever made these was good at it, they got them very straight. They were then balanced (the tacked on metal tabs) assembled front and rear, checked again and an index line stamped for correct front and rear assembly.
However, over time, (MANY years) the area shrunk, will relax, and the bow returns. The original fix can be repeated, but today, GOOD driveshaft shops can re-tube them more easily. The above was true to the late 60's or early 70's. After that, Alfa and Ferrari went to a better method!
From my experience.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thats interesting. The joint was on the dry side. in any event, the female yoke is now replaced and the splined joint is fixed, as are all the UJ's and the flex link up front which was split almost all the way through in a couple of places. So as soon as I can replace the pinion seal it goes back in for a drive and we will see how it runs.

I have bought the pinion nut tool if anyone wants to borrow this I have one which is on offer for the price of return postage.

TS
 
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