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I changed my pump in May, and aside from shaving down some 1/4 inch drive sockets to fit in tight spaces, I found that my son’s smaller hands came in handy when it came to working in tight spots. My family now accuses me of employing slave/child labor.
 

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It isnt slave labor, it is spending quality time with your son and sharing some mechanical knowledge with him! Oh there is also the 25 years of support dues.....
 

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Likely to be an unpopular opinion on this thread but I would strongly consider converting to carbs. I was at a similar crossroads a couple years ago with my 74 Spider, after its 3rd SPICA injection pump gave up the ghost. The second was a rebuilt unit from Wes, professionally installed by an Alfa expert and well maintained. It lasted about 12 years and starting was always an issue, even with a new TA and, eventually, Shankle S(h)ure Start. (My 3rd pump was a used one so that is on me.) I have a lot of respect for Wes and understand that many others have had great luck with SPICA but that was not my experience after wrestling with it for 15+ years.

Rather than pony up $2K and wait 7-8 months to roll the dice again, I converted to carbs last winter and the car has run great ever since (knock on wood...). Dellorto's are generally a little cheaper than Webers and I would recommend the full Euro conversion with the proper intake manifold, throttle linkage, etc. It's relatively easy to install, most of the parts are available from APE, and the carbs can be rebuilt, as needed, for a few hundred dollars. Just my two cents that carbs are a viable option and may be less hassle / expense in the long run if you are not concerned with originality. Good luck.
 

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I have a 78 Spider. Wes rebuilt my SPICA about 7 years ago. One of the best investments you will make in your Alfa, hands down. Once working properly, it is just about maintenance free and bullet proof. It is a PITA getting in and out though, but worth it. Make a list of things to do "while in there"
 

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Likely to be an unpopular opinion on this thread but I would strongly consider converting to carbs. I was at a similar crossroads a couple years ago with my 74 Spider, after its 3rd SPICA injection pump gave up the ghost. The second was a rebuilt unit from Wes, professionally installed by an Alfa expert and well maintained. It lasted about 12 years and starting was always an issue, even with a new TA and, eventually, Shankle S(h)ure Start. (My 3rd pump was a used one so that is on me.) I have a lot of respect for Wes and understand that many others have had great luck with SPICA but that was not my experience after wrestling with it for 15+ years.

Rather than pony up $2K and wait 7-8 months to roll the dice again, I converted to carbs last winter and the car has run great ever since (knock on wood...). Dellorto's are generally a little cheaper than Webers and I would recommend the full Euro conversion with the proper intake manifold, throttle linkage, etc. It's relatively easy to install, most of the parts are available from APE, and the carbs can be rebuilt, as needed, for a few hundred dollars. Just my two cents that carbs are a viable option and may be less hassle / expense in the long run if you are not concerned with originality. Good luck.
Boo, boo, hiss
 

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Richard Jemison
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Regardless of claims from ANYONE Spica is a painful replacement for Weber Carbs. I`ve never heard of a owner switching back fro Webers to Spica.
 

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At the age the Spica cars are it is time for the owners to maintain these cars as designed regardless of the issues that may present. The car I have was purchased new as a 1973. I have maintained it, with help from the owner's club members, for these 40 something years. Spica it was when built. Spica it is today.
 

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Discussion Starter #29
Thanks again to all of the folks who've posted their experiences here; it has been very educational. My mechanic had given me options of a set of period Italian Webers in exchange for my first born son, or a later set of Spanish-made Webers, but I could hear the relief in his voice when I told him I would rather stick with the SPICA. He agreed that it was the best option of the three, and also least expensive.

My mechanic, who specializes in Alfas and is pretty much the guy in Chicagoland, so if you live here, you know of whom I speak, had the SPICA off overnight. He told me I had a full gallon of gas in the oil! He also removed that.

Because of the likely long wait, I had my car towed home (thanks, AAA Premium, for the free tow!) and the SPICA was already nicely packed into a box, so all I had to do was to bring it to the post office to mail - $79 including $2K worth of insurance. Top Tip: I was told that, since this repair is technically done by my mechanic, and all I did was mail it, my wait time might be a little less than if I had yarded it out and sent it myself.

I guess it means that I have plenty of time to fix the many other little things with the spider. I'm lucky that it doesn't have any rust, a fact my mechanic has mentioned several times. When I suggested that I might install a frame stiffener in the future, he said it wouldn't be necessary because of that.

I still want to get a Euro-bumper replacement, but since the SPICA repair will cost up to $3 Grand, the bumpers will have to wait.

I will also try to find a reputable place to restore the wheels. Recommendations for places near Chicago for that would be appreciated!

After my last visit to my mechanic, in 2017, the car ran great, and right up until the SPICA failed, it would start on the first crank, something that always pleased me. So, I am looking forward to another few years of smooth running when it's completed.
 
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Boo, boo, hiss
Yeah, I figured that might trigger some of the purists. Constructive...

At the age the Spica cars are it is time for the owners to maintain these cars as designed regardless of the issues that may present. The car I have was purchased new as a 1973. I have maintained it, with help from the owner's club members, for these 40 something years. Spica it was when built. Spica it is today.
Congratulations. Truly inspiring... I respect the OP for deciding to stick with SPICA and can see both sides of the argument. But some of us decided to maintain our cars "as designed" for the rest of the world when the "issues that may present" included several $K and a whole driving season of waiting. If anyone needs either of my broken injection pumps, shure start, intake manifold, air box, etc. let me know...
 

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Yeah, I figured that might trigger some of the purists. Constructive...


Congratulations. Truly inspiring... I respect the OP for deciding to stick with SPICA and can see both sides of the argument. But some of us decided to maintain our cars "as designed" for the rest of the world when the "issues that may present" included several $K and a whole driving season of waiting. If anyone needs either of my broken injection pumps, shure start, intake manifold, air box, etc. let me know...
I will still take all of the parts. All we have to do is arrange for the shipping.
 

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Discussion Starter #33
Here we are, five months later. My SPICA was returned from Wes's and has been re-installed and is, just like a poster's term above, "purring like a cat," says my mechanic. However, when he closed the radiator cap after filling it up, the entire neck came off in his hand! So, coolant was drained and the radiator sent to a nearby shop to repair. I am to receive it in time for Thanksgiving, I'm told. That radiator had been removed for another repair, the drain valve, and cleaned up at the same time, 3 or 4 years ago. I might start thinking of sourcing a nice new radiator in the future.

I'll let you know how it feels when I drive it home. I hope it's not too cold! High is forecast at 46, but no rain, so top down and down jacket on, it is.
 

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New rad from classic alfa is close to the cost of a rad repair.... good luck and safe top down driving
 

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Push hard and live
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Betting your rad is a bunch of corrosion flying in loose formation. Get a new one.
 
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