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Discussion Starter #1
I have a spare 1969 Spica pump at my disposal that is in poor condition. I want to take it apart completely so as to better understand it's inner workings but I also don't want to ruin the parts while doing so. I am puzzled as to how to remove the 3D cam from the main shaft...is it simply pressed on? What is the safest way to remove this? If someone has done this before .....your input would be most welcome.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
With the logic section housing removed, I believe it should slide right back and off the main shaft. Is it not free to slide on the mainshaft?
I read your reply earlier in the day.....and when I got home today I attempted to coax it off the shaft by heating and applying liberal amounts of penetrating oil. By supporting the 3D cam and applying some force to the shaft ...it eventually came loose. Needless to say...due to improper storage of this pump...rust has built up on the shaft and other internals rendering it somewhat useless now.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Here's the condition of the shaft that I found once I was able to remove (with force) the 3d Cam and bearing assembly. I suppose that if I had no other spare parts available this could be polished out to usable condition. But since I have what I believe to be 2 good 69 pumps and 4 or 5 other later pumps....this will just sit idle for eternity.

IMG_4913.jpg

Further disassembly of this pump has showed me why older pumps with an unknown history must be partially disassembled and very thoroughly cleaned out. Changing out filters is not enough....here's what I found inside the pressure relief valve chamber on this pump. The relief spring was completely plugged up with very thick almost solid gray sludge. I'm sure similar pumps sitting idle for years will show similar levels of contamination and sludge.

IMG_4910.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Roadtrip...I've been saving the numerous Spica guides that were made available by yourself and others on this BB....but for the life of me I can't seem to locate the one section that shows /describes how to test the pump for leaking plunger pistons....which document shown that again?
 

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I think you're thinking of the flame test where you take some engine oil (or preferably, oil from the logic section), and try and ignite it. If it ignites fairly readily, there's probably gasoline in the oil. Also, the usual sniff check. Another big clue-bird would be increase oil level in the sump.

I'll look around to see if I can find the direct references, when I get time.
 

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a common technique is to empty the pump of all oil, lay on its side, remove the side cover and fill with kerosene. Then pressurize the fuel inlet with 100 psi air. look for bubbles. I;ve been told to wait 15 minutes to see if any bubbles are present.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
a common technique is to empty the pump of all oil, lay on its side, remove the side cover and fill with kerosene. Then pressurize the fuel inlet with 100 psi air. look for bubbles. I;ve been told to wait 15 minutes to see if any bubbles are present.
That is the procedure I was thinking of....and I recall seeing it in print somewhere. I thought I had it saved in one of the documents I've collected over the years.....but I just can't place it.
 

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my compressor wont get to 350! I think the idea is to identify blatant leakers ; It was Frank at FAM in Poway (Alfa factory trained in SPICA) that did this all the time as I recall
 

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Spica pump explosion? Matches and gasoline don't mix. LOL usually the sniff test will suffice when you pull the dip stick.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
That one's new to me. But the pump, under it's own pressure, is about 350 psi.
Well I just found the location of this testing sequence.....wouldn't you know it...it's in Wes Ingram's Manual (Detroit 2007 Edition) Section 100 on page 34 titled "How to detect a defective pump"....I knew I read that somewhere I recall reading his manual after the Tech session he hosted at the 2007 Detroit AROC convention. :smile2:
 
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