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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I’m restarting my ‘72 GTV restoration after a few years of life got in the way. I had Wes Ingram rebuild the SPICA but that was 5 years ago. It was never installed and is still in the box it came in. It’ll probably be another year or two before fuel flows through it again.

My question is whether I should be worried about any deterioration of the seals or any of Wes’ other magic? Can it sit for this long without ill effects?
 

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Storing it for such an extended period in a dry environment should not be a major problem. I would however ensure that these is some oil in the logic section and that the pumping section get some moisture displacing compound like WD40 which can be squirted liberally in the fuel inlet port.....then turn over the pump every so often to keep things lubed. You should ask Wes' opinion on the best storing technique for the pump.
 

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I had one like that, when I installed it the spica front seal was leaking like a sieve - and it essentially fell out when I removed the pulley to replace it - is suggest you replace that seal
 

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I have been told by several well known Alfa mechanics that the pumps do not sit well, and often are not useable after storage.

The suggestion to save a pump being stored was to "pickle" it in Marvel Mystery Oil...
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks to all for your feedback. The pump has been stored in my garage in Southern California so at least the environment isn't too harsh. I'll definitely reach out to Wes for his opinion and plan on doing some lubrication to try to help make it last.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I had one like that, when I installed it the spica front seal was leaking like a sieve - and it essentially fell out when I removed the pulley to replace it - is suggest you replace that seal
Was that the only problem you had? Is there a reason to think this seal in particular is the main concern?
 

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Not sure, all I can say is my experience- a rubber seal like that will dry out — mine was stored in the garage in San Diego for about 5 years
 

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As @1750GT mentions, keep some oil in the the logic section, and rotate the pulley occasionally with some sea foam spray. As long as you keep it high and dry it will be fine. I have used pumps stored this way and have never had an issue, when put in use.
 
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If Wes rebuilt it and it hasn’t been used yet. I would email him and ask.
 

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There is very little rubber inside it. Front seal, as mentioned above, and the seal over the button for the microswitch. Plunger for the cold start is plastic, can swell in oil. But you can test that. If stored indoors in a mild climate, I wouldn't worry much. Turn gently by hand, remove barometric capsule "base" and look inside for corrosion. If it looks good I'd use it.
Andrew
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks to all for the advice. I emailed Wes and this was his reply:

If the pump is in the bag and stored indoors it should be fine.
Carefully turn the pump shaft, if it wont' turn let me know.


Pump was still in the bag and the shaft turned. It's back in the bag for now!
 

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Thanks to all for the advice. I emailed Wes and this was his reply:

If the pump is in the bag and stored indoors it should be fine.
Carefully turn the pump shaft, if it wont' turn let me know.


Pump was still in the bag and the shaft turned. It's back in the bag for now!
Thats what I figured. Which is why I suggested to reach out to him.
 
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1969 1750 Spider Dual 45DCOE (converted)
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Great timing on this question. I have a Spica pump and system that was removed from my 69 1750 back in 1979 and has just been on a dusty shelf. I am beginning to get my car back on the road after being torn down since 1989. I always ran Webers on it and am wondering if I should put the Fuel Injection system back together or continue to run webers. Big question is how much work and expense it would be to recondition the fuel injection and if it would really make the drivability of the car any different. I always enjoyed driving the car with the webers but then again, I was a kid. I have now just turned 60 and enjoy the trouble free driving and creature comforts of my 2016 Masertti Quatroporte, so fiddling with dual carbs may be less appealing to me these days.
 

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Put it back to Spica! If you are planning to re-use the pump off the shelf it will depend on how it was pickled. What condition was it in when you removed it back in 1979? How much mileage is on it? I find that Spica pumps are very robust. However, it would at least require a complete bench check with a barrel and plunger leakage test. If its determined to be a leaker, it should be sent off for rebuilding. If the Spica system is set up correctly, you will not experience any driveablitity issues vs. Webers.
 

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On the 1969’s. There was very little difference in performance between the factory euro and spica set up. Mileage tend to be better on the spica
 
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