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I have my pump out and found that the microswitch works when I move the actuator by hand. Pressing on the side of the actuator with the adjuster closes the switch, which is normally open.


I looked at Wes’ manual to figure out if it may be out of adjustment. The manual calls for .015 inch of clearance at the oil cup. I am confused about how to achieve this as screwing the adjuster in moves the lever closer to the oil cup and backing it all the way out lets the spring under the lever keep it in contact with the oil cup.

Can anyone help me achieve the right gap?

Adjustments.jpg

Adjustments.jpg

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The fuel lines don’t need to be gorilla’d onto the standpipes. (Snip).
Yes, but...
The motor was out and on a stand with Spica in place. So I had plenty of clearance to get a wrench on number one. The fuel line nuts were fairly tight!
I’d hazard to guess maybe 30-35ft lbs.

After removing #1, I also removed the protruding ‘connector body’ (the part with the spring inside), which gave me access to #2, and so forth. I kept everything scrupulously clean and put back those connector bodies and then covered each one with a rubber cap. When I reassemble, I will as little tightness as needed to ensure no leaks.
 

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Success!!!

The switches came today. Testing them on the bench, the action is great - very tight and completely reliable with my meter. The numbering of the terminals is different than the old one but the function is the same. The top ones are the ones to use as they are normally open and connect when the switch is depressed.

View attachment 865081

I clipped the bottom two terminals off since they are not used and the old one also had them removed. I soldered the leads onto the new switch and installed it in the holder/assembly that mounts it on the pump.

The SPICA Overhaul and Calibration manual has clear instructions on how to adjust the switch. I used a 1mm feeler gauge and adjusted the screw to just turn on and confirmed that it always turned off in the rest position.

As a bonus I wired together a relay to turn on the dashboard light usually used by the secondary oil pressure sensor (sending it to ground when the lead to the FCS is energized). That let me confirm right away once everything was back together that it was working. And then test driving it around the light came on every time I expected it would and never when I didn't. It works GREAT!

I won't leave the dashboard light that way for long but its awesome to see exactly when the FCS is engaged.

We will just have to wait and see if the new switch holds up to the heat, vibration and general rough environment in the pump long term, but I'm pretty optimistic. They seem like they are identical to the old switch I took out but nice and new.

Obviously the biggest pain of the whole ordeal is pulling and replacing the SPICA pump. I've done it three times now (in the ~25 years I've owned the car) and this time I actually felt like it wasn't that bad. A stubby 13mm wrench is key for getting the base nuts that hold the pump and everything else just comes down to being patient and methodical.

For just over six dollars, the new switch seems like a bargain and I'm really happy to have the system working properly again - no burbles!

Kris

View attachment 865073
Looking back THIS is the post and illustration I needed. I thought I had all of the manuals but cannot find this drawing. I have the attached instruction and maintenance manual for Alfa 2000 fuel injected models 1973 and Wes Ingram‘s book along with materials that Bullitin board members created but cannot find that diagram. EDIT i found this PDF but never printed it thinking I would never be overhauling a pump.

I believe I am doing this correctly but have used a .015 inch shim as listed in Wes Ingram’s manual. The test light is on with the shim in, off otherwise. Would hate to have to pull the pump again.
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